May 31, 2016

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu Insights: Building a nervous system for OpenStack

Big Software is a new class of software composed of so many moving pieces that humans, by themselves, cannot design, deploy or operate them. OpenStack, Hadoop and container-based architectures are all byproducts of Big Software. The only way to address the complexity is with automatic, AI-powered analytics.

DeepStack UI Demo

Summary

Canonical and Skymind are working together to help System Administrators operate large OpenStack instances. With the growth of cloud computing, the size of data has surpassed humans’ ability to cope with it. In particular, overwhelming amounts of data make it difficult to identify patterns; e.g. signals that precede server failure. Using deep learning, Skymind enables OpenStack to discover patterns automatically, predict server failure and take preventative actions.

Canonical story

Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, was founded in March 2004 and launched its Linux distribution six months later. Shortly thereafter, Amazon created AWS, the first public cloud. Canonical worked to make Ubuntu the easiest option for AWS and later public cloud computing platforms.

In 2010, OpenStack was created as the open-source alternative to the public cloud. Quickly, the complexity of deploying and running OpenStack at cloud scale showed that traditional configuration management, which focuses on instances (i.e. machines, servers) rather than running micro-service architectures, was not the right approach. This was the beginning of what Canonical named the Era of Big Software.

Big Software is a class of software made up of so many moving pieces that humans cannot design, deploy and operate alone. It is meant to evoke big data, defined initially as data you cannot store on a single machine. OpenStack, Hadoop and container-based architectures are all big software.

The problem with Big Software

Day 1: Deployment

The first challenge of big software is to create a service model for successful deployment; that is, to find a way to support immediate and successful installations of that software. Canonical has created several tools to streamline this process. Those tools help map software to available resources:

  • MAAS: Metal as a Service which is a provisioning API for bare metal servers
  • Landscape: Policy and governance tool for large fleets of OS instances
  • Juju: Service modeling software to model and deploy big software

Day 2: Operations

Big Software is hard to model and deploy and even harder to operate, which means day 2 operations also need a new approach.

Traditional monitoring and logging tools were designed for operators who only had to oversee data generated by fewer than 100 servers. They would find patterns manually, create SQL queries to catch harmful events, and receive notifications if they needed to act. When noSQL became available, this improved marginally, since queries would scale.

But that doesn’t solve the core problem today. With Big Software, there is so much data that a normal human cannot cope with and find patterns of behaviour that result in server failure.

AI and the future of Big Software

This is where AI comes in. Deep Learning is the future of those day 2 operations. Neural nets can learn from massive amounts of data to find almost any needle in almost any haystack. Those nets are a tool that vastly extends the power of traditional system admins; in a sense, transforming their role.

Initially, neural nets will be a tool to triage logs, surface interesting patterns and predict hardware failure. As humans react to these events and label data (by confirming the AI’s predictions), the power to make certain operational decisions will be given to the AI directly: e.g. scale this service in/out, kill this node, move these containers, etc.
Finally, as the AI learns, self-healing data centers will become standard. AI will eventually modify code to improve and remodel the infrastructure as it discovers better models adapted to the resources at hand.

The first generation Deep Learning solution looks like this: HDFS + Mesos + Spark + DL4J + Spark Notebook. It’s an enablement model, so that anyone can do Deep Learning. But using Skymind on OpenStack is just the beginning.

Ultimately, Canonical wants every piece of software to be scrutinised and learnt in order to build the best architectures and operating tools.

Learn more

View the Original article to learn more about how Canonical and Skymind are working together to solve Deep Learning problems. Alternatively, you can get in touch with our team.

Skymind

Skymind provides scalable deep learning for industry. It is the commercial support arm of the open-source project Deeplearning4j, a versatile deep-learning framework written for the JVM. Skymind’s artificial neural nets can run on desktop, mobile, and massively parallel GPUs and CPUs in the cloud to analyze text, images, sound and time series data. A few use cases: facial recognition, image search, theme detection and augmented search in text, speech-to-text and CRM.

About the author

Chris Nicholson

Chris Nicholson is the founder and CEO of Skymind. He spends his days helping enterprises build Deep Learning applications.

31 May, 2016 11:00AM

hackergotchi for Clonezilla live

Clonezilla live

Stable Clonezilla live (2.4.6-25) Released

This release of Clonezilla live (2.4.6-25) includes minor enhancements and bug fixes.

ENHANCEMENTS and CHANGES

  • The underlying GNU/Linux operating system was upgraded. This release is based on the Debian Sid repository (as of 2016/May/29).
  • Linux kernel was updated to 4.5.4-1.
  • Partclone was updated to 0.2.88. Some segfault issues have been fixed.
  • Add support for boot parameter ocs_preload*. It can be used to fetch tarall/zip/sh files from http(s), ftp, tftp, and local URL then extract to /opt/. Thanks to Aaron Burling (aaron_burling at lkstevens wednet edu) for this idea and providing sample codes.
  • Add package dos2unix.
  • Add watch ocs-scan-disk for local block device in prep-ocsroot.
  • Make ocs-install-grub work on Opensuse leap 42.
  • Add an error routine to makeboot.bat and makeboot64.bat. Thanks to Robert Rubino.
  • Add new program ocs-match-checksum to match checksum in the image and files in the block device.
  • The new example file mdisks-checksum was added. It can be used to save or restore disk with checksum mechanism enabled. Especially for deploying multiple disks.
  • An example gen-rec-iso was added. It could be used to create a recovery ISO directly from the machine by Clonezilla live.
  • A new mechanism was added to inspect the files checksum in the partition. To use it, enable "-gmf" option in expert mode when saving an image and enable "-cmf" option when restoring image. For disk to disk clone, use "-cmf" option. Thanks to Scott Inglis (scottinglis at me com) for this request.

BUG FIXES

  • Failed to change the host name of MS Windows. Now use iproute2 to get MAC address and IP address info in ocs-chnthn-functions. Thanks to Richard Stanway for the patch. (https://github.com/stevenshiau/clonezilla/pull/22)
  • Renaming live image extension to .tar when using tar. Thanks to minh hieu trinh for reporting this. (https://sourceforge.net/p/clonezilla/bugs/251/)

31 May, 2016 08:54AM by Steven Shiau

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Zygmunt Krynicki: snapd 2.0.5 released, new release cadence

There's a new release of snapd arriving in Ubuntu 16.04. As before, our fearless release manager Michael Vogt has crafted the work and made sure it can arrive to your machines on a timely basis.

You can see the changelog below, annotated with links to fixed bugs. I would only like to highlight one bug which improves experience of snaps under Unity 7.

New snapd releases are now planned to happen every week. You can expect a steady stream of fresh snappy goodness in both snapd and in the store. With this in mind we also plan to change the version scheme. Currently, as you can see below, we use 2.0.x for each micro-release. This system will quickly get meaningless so we will likely witch to a date-based release names instead . Expect to see a 2016W22 (or ..23) release next time around.

On the development front, many interesting changes are in the pipeline. While not a part of snapd 2.0.5 they should be released in the next few weeks, at most. You can expect applications to gain ability to play sound and music using the new pulseaudio interface. This ability, along with bug fixes to opengl should unlock the ability to deliver many popular games as snaps. Game on!

There's also ongoing work to allow sharing data from the classic Ubuntu and snaps. One of our first goals is to allow sharing fonts. This will improve the user experience of snaps that want to take advantage of custom, locally installed fonts. It should also allow us to package fonts as snaps in the near future. The underlying technology is very generic and I'm sure we'll find many interesting things to share this way.

As always, you can reach out to us on IRC (#snappy) and on the mailing list (snapcraft@lists.ubuntu.com, see this post for details). If you have any questions we will be happy to answer them.

See you next week!

snapd (2.0.5) xenial; urgency=medium

* New upstream release: LP: #1583085
- interfaces: add dbusmenu, freedesktop and kde notifications to
unity7 (LP: #1573188)
- daemon: make localSnapInfo return SnapState
- cmd: make snap list with no snaps not special
- debian: workaround for XDG_DATA_DIRS issues
- cmd,po: fix conflicts, apply review from #1154
- snap,store: load and store the private flag sent by the store in
SideInfo
- interfaces/apparmor/template.go: adjust /dev/shm to be more usable
- store: use purchase decorator in Snap and FindSnaps
- interfaces: first version of the networkmanager interface
- snap, snappy: implement the new (minmimal) kernel spec
- cmd/snap, debian: move manpage generation to depend on an environ
key; also, fix completion

-- Michael Vogt Thu, 19 May 2016 15:29:16 +0200

snapd (2.0.4) xenial; urgency=medium

* New upstream release:
- interfaces: cleanup explicit denies
- integration-tests: remove the ancient integration daemon tests
- integration-tests: add network-bind interface test
- integration-tests: add actual checks for undoing install
- integration-tests: add store login test
- snap: add certain implicit slots only on classic
- integration-tests: add coverage flags to snapd.service ExecStart
setting when building from branch
- integration-tests: remove the tests for features removed in 16.04.
- daemon, overlord/snapstate: "(de)activate" is no longer a thing
- docs: update meta.md and security.md for current snappy
- debian: always start snapd
- integration-tests: add test for undoing failed install
- overlord: handle ensureNext being in the past
- overlord/snapstate,overlord/snapstate/backend,snappy: start
backend porting LinkSnap and UnlinkSnap
- debian/tests: add reboot capability to autopkgtest and execute
snapPersistsSuite
- daemon,snappy,progress: drop license agreement broken logic
- daemon,client,cmd/snap: nice access denied message
(LP: #1574829)
- daemon: add user parameter to all commands
- snap, store: rework purchase methods into decorators
- many: simplify release package and add OnClassic
- interfaces: miscellaneous policy updates
- snappy,wrappers: move desktop files handling to wrappers
- snappy: remove some obviously dead code
- interfaces/builtin: quote apparmor label
- many: remove the gadget yaml support from snappy
- snappy,systemd,wrappers: move service units generation to wrappers
- store: add method to determine if a snap must be bought
- store: add methods to read purchases from the store
- wrappers,snappy: move binary wrapper generation to new package
wrappers
- snap: add `snap help` command
- integration-tests: remove framework-test data and avoid using
config-snap for now
- builtin/unity7.go: allow using gmenu. Closes: LP:#1576287
- add integration test to verify fix for LP:#1571721

-- Michael Vogt Fri, 13 May 2016 17:19:37 -0700

31 May, 2016 07:56AM by Zygmunt Krynicki (noreply@blogger.com)

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 467

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #467 for the week May 23 – 29, 2016, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Chris Sirrs
  • Simon Quigley
  • Chris Guiver
  • Seth Johnson
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

31 May, 2016 02:51AM

Paul Tagliamonte: Iron Blogger DC

Back in 2014, Mako ran a Boston Iron Blogger chapter, where you had to blog once a week, or you owed $5 into the pot. A while later, I ran it (along with Molly and Johns), and things were great.

When I moved to DC, I had already talked with Tom Lee and Eric Mill about running a DC Iron Blogger chapter, but it hasn’t happened in the year and a half I’ve been in DC.

This week, I make good on that, with a fantastic group set up at dc.iron-blogger.com; with more to come (I’m sure!).

Looking forward to many parties and though provoking blog posts in my future. I’m also quite pleased I’ll be resuming my blogging. Hi, again, planet Debian!

31 May, 2016 01:37AM

May 30, 2016

Sebastian Kügler: Multiscreen in Plasma 5.7 and beyond

Here’s a quick status update about where we currently stand with respect to multiscreen support in Plasma Desktop.

While for many people, multiscreen support in Plasma works nicely, for some of our users, it doesn’t. There are problems with restoring previously set up configurations, and around the primary display mechanism. We’re really unhappy about that, and we’re working on fixing it for all of our users. These kinds of bugs are the stuff nightmares are made of, so there’s not a silver bullet to fix everything of it, once and for all right away. Multiscreen support requires many different components to play in tune with each other, and they’re usually divided into separate processes communicating via different channels with each other. There’s X11 involved, XCB, Qt, libkscreen and of course the Plasma shell. I can easily at least three different protocols in this game, Wayland being a fourth (but likely not used at the same time as X11). There’s quite some complexity involved, and the individual components involved are actually doing their jobs quite well and have their specific purposes. Let me give an overview.

Multiscreen components

Plasma Shell renders the desktop, places panels, etc., When a new screen is connected, it checks whether it has an existing configuration (wallpaper, widgets, panels etc.) and extends the desktop. Plasma shell gets its information from QScreen now (more on that later on!)

KWin is the compositor and window manager. KWin/X11 interacts with X11 and is responsible for window management, movement, etc.. Under Wayland, it will also take the job of the graphical and display server work that X11 currently does, though mostly through Wayland and *GL APIs.

KScreen kded is a little daemon (actually a plugin) that keeps track of connected monitors and applies existing configs when they change

KScreen is a module in systemsettings that allows to set up the display hardware, positioning, resolution, etc.

Libkscreen is the library that backs the KScreen configuration. It offers an API abstraction over XRandR and Wayland. libkscreen sits pretty much at the heart of proper multiscreen support when it comes to configuring manually and loading the configuration.

Primary Desktop

The primary display mechanism is a bit of API (rooted in X11) to mark a display as primary. This is used to place the Panel in Plasma, and for example to show the login manager window on the correct monitor.

Libkscreen and Qt’s native QScreen are two different mechanism to reflect screen information. QScreen is mainly used for querying info (and is of course used throughout QtGui to place windows, get information about resolution and DPI, etc.). Libkscreen has all this information as well, but also some more, such as write support. Libkscreen’s backends get this information directly from Xorg, not going through Qt’s QScreen API. For plasmashell, we ended up needing both, since it was not possible to find the primary display using Qt’s API. This causes quite some problems since X11 is async by its nature, so essentially we ended up having “unfixable” race conditions, also in plasmashell. These are likely the root cause of the bug you’re seeing here.

This API has been added in Qt 5.6 (among a few other fixes) by Aleix Pol, one of our devs in the screen management team. We have removed libkscreen from plasmashell today and replaced it with “pure QScreen” code, since all the API we need for plasmashell is now available in the Qt we depend on.

These changes should fix much of the panel placement grief that bug 356225 causes. It does need some good testing, now it’s merged. Therefore, we’d like to see as many people, especially those reporting problem with multiscreen, to test against latest Plasma git master (or the upcoming Plasma 5.7 Beta, which is slated for release on June, 16th).

Remember the config

Another rough area that is under observation right now is remembering and picking the right configuration from a previous setup, for example when you return to your docking station which has another display connected. Bug 358011 is an example for that. Here, we get “spurious” events about hardware changes from X11, and I’m unsure where they come from. The problem is that it’s not easy to reproduce, it only happens for certain setups. This bug was likely introduced with the move to Qt 5 and Frameworks, it’s a regression compared to Plasma 4.
I’ve re-reviewed the existing code, added more autotests and made the code more robust in some places that seemed relevant, but I can’t say that we’ve found a sure solution to these problems. The code is now also better instrumented for debugging the areas at play here. Now we need some more testing of the upcoming beta. This is certainly not unfixable, but needs feedback from testing so we can apply further fixes if needed.

Code quality musings

From a software engineering point of view, we’re facing some annoying problems. It took us a long time to get upstream QScreen code to be robust and featureful enough to draw the lines between the components involved, especially QScreen and libkscreen more clearly, which certainly helps to reduce hard-to-debug race conditions involving hardware events. The fact that it’s almost impossible to properly unit test large parts of the stack (X11 and hardware events are especially difficult in that regard) means that it’s hard to control the quality. On the other hand, we’re lacking testers, especially those that face said problems and are able to test the latest versions of Qt and Plasma.
QA processes is something we spent some serious work on, on the one hand, our review processes for new code and changes to current code are a lot stricter, so we catch more problems and potential side-effects before code gets merged. For new code, especially the Wayland support, our QA story also looks a lot better. We’re aiming for near-100% autotest coverage, and in many cases, the autotests are a lot more demanding than the real world use cases. Still, it’s a lot of new code that needs some real world exposure, which we hope to get more of when users test Plasma 5.7 using Wayland.

30 May, 2016 10:56PM

Costales: Ubucon Paris 16.04. Day 2

Last day of the Ubucon Paris of release xenial!

Podcast in 3... 2... 1...
This time, we did an international podcast. Rudy, Quesh, Didier, Gonzalo and me from the Ubuntu Party and Marius, Ilonka, Alfred and even Simon from their homes.
We spoke about the Ubucons, tablet, news. So great experience!



It was a few hours, until the launch time. Then I ate with Gonzalo, Rudy, Winael, Didier and Yoboy.

After the lunch, I saw a Gemma's conference.

Gemma's talk

Nicolas and me were catching public inside the event from the hall of the building. And it worked so well.

Nicolas did a so great work!!

The Ubucon event was closed by Rudy, explaining thinks about the convergence, ubucon... etc.

Last conference
We finished in a restaurant, with no so much people as yesterday, but enough :) Dinner and a few drinks together.

Cheers!
Excited, this was a great event. The Ubuntu Paris is doing a so great work and this team is incredible.
Congrats!!

Convergence

Lovely Mozilla!

Hall

Quesh

wow!

Indeed!

Future :)


Until the next!

30 May, 2016 09:54PM by Marcos Costales (noreply@blogger.com)

hackergotchi for Emmabuntüs Debian Edition

Emmabuntüs Debian Edition

Comité de soutien pour Cellou Diallo contre son expulsion

Cellou Diallo, d’origine guinéenne, est très connu dans les communautés OpenStreetMap et Drupal. Il s’est fait arrêter lundi 23 mai 2016. Il a été traduit devant le tribunal administratif de Montpellier jeudi 26 mai à 10h30 pour une mesure d’expulsion, « OQTF » (Obligation de Quitter le Territoire Français). Le comité de soutien pour @celdiallo commence à [...]

30 May, 2016 08:03PM by shihtzu

hackergotchi for Maemo developers

Maemo developers

How about …

Next time, I show you how to turn that ViewModel into a Visitor? And then make a view that shows the syntax and outline of a parsed file’s language?

How about I turn my blog into the programmers’ equivalent to Dobbit magazine? :-)

Who knows what I’ll come up with next time. I guess I don’t know myself.

0 Add to favourites0 Bury

30 May, 2016 07:48PM by Philip Van Hoof (pvanhoof@gnome.org)

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Can I haz MainView in a Window?

When using Unity8 these days connecting a Bluetooth mouse to a device enables windowed mode. Another option is to connect an external monitor via HDMI and most recently on some devices wireless displays. This raises a few questions on the API side of things.

Apps are currently advised to use a MainView as the root item, which can have a width and a height used as the window dimensions in a windowed environment - on phones and tablets by default all apps are always full screen. As soon as users can freely resize the window, some apps may not look great anymore - QtQuick.Window solves this by providing minimum/maximum/Width/Height properties. Another question is what title is used for the window - as soon as there is more than one Page that's no longer obvious and it's actually somewhat redundant.

So what can we do now?

There’s two ways to sort this that we’ll be discussing here. One way is to in fact go ahead and use MainView, which is just an Item, and put it inside a Window. That’s perfectly fine to do and that’s a good stop-gap for any apps affected now. To the user the outcome is almost the same, except the title and sizing can be customized behind the scenes.

import QtQuick 2.4
import QtQuick.Window 2.2
import Ubuntu.Components 1.3
Window {
    title: "Hello World"
    minimumWidth: units.gu(30)
    minimumHeight: units.gu(50)
    maximumWidth: units.gu(90)
    maximumHeight: units.gu(120)
    MainView {
        applicationName: "Hello World"
    }
}

From here on after things work exactly the same way they did before. And this is something that will continue to work in the future.

A challenger appears

That said, there’s another way under discussion. What if there was a new MainWindow component that could replace the MainView and provide the missing features out of the box? Code would be simpler. Is it worth it, though, just to save some lines of code you might wonder? Yes actually. It is worth it when performance enters the picture.

As it is now, MainView does many different things. It displays a header for starters - that is, if you’re not using AdaptivePageLayout to implement convergence. It also has automaticOrientation API, something the shell does a much better job of these days. And it handles actions, which are, like the header, part of each Page now. It’s still doing a good job at things we need, like setting up folders for confinement (config, cache, localization) and making space for the OSK (in the form of anchorsToKeyboard). So in short, there’s several internals to re-consider if we had a chance to replace it.

Even more drastic would be the impact of implementing properties in MainWindow that right now are context properties. “units” and “theme” are very useful in so many ways and at the same time by design super slow because of how QML processes them. A new toplevel component in C++ could provide regular object properties without the overhead potentially speeding up every single use of those properties throughout the application as well as the components using them behind the scenes.

Let’s be realistic, however, these are ideas that need discussion, API design and planning. None of this is going to be available tomorrow or next week. So by all means, engage in the discussions, maybe there’s more use cases to consider, other approaches, it’s the one component virtually every app uses so we better do a good job coming up with a worthy successor.

30 May, 2016 01:06PM by Zoltán Balogh (zoltan.balogh@canonical.com)

Kubuntu: Plasma 5.6.4 available in 16.04 Backports

The Kubuntu Team announces the availability of Plasma 5.6.4 on Kubuntu 16.04 though our Backports PPA.

Plasma 5.6.4 Announcement:
https://www.kde.org/announcements/plasma-5.6.4.php

How to get the update (in the commandline):
1. sudo apt-add-repository ppa:kubuntu-ppa/backports
2. sudo apt update
3. sudo apt full-upgrade -y

Plasma 5.6.4 Screenshot - 16.04

Here is a great video demoing the some of the new features in this release:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0TzoXhAbxg

30 May, 2016 12:15PM

Forums Council: New Ubuntu Member via forums contributions

The Forum Council is proud to announce a new Ubuntu membership obtained through forum contributions.

Please welcome our newest Member, Mark Phelps. You can see Mark’s application thread here.

Mark has been a been a long time contributor and has always showed sustained and helpful contributions to the forums.

If you have been a contributor to the forums and wish to apply to Ubuntu Membership, all you have to do is to put together a wiki and Launchpad pages, sign the Ubuntu Code of Conduct and follow the process outlined in the Ubuntu Membership via Forums contributions wiki page.


30 May, 2016 10:24AM

May 29, 2016

Svetlana Belkin: What Programs Do I Use: Mudlet

Like many people, I have different hobbies and also like many, I play computer/video games. But not the extreme, as some though. I do have Steam and my username is senseopennes if you want to add me. I played many graphical games but I tend to get bored of them fast.  I mean it.  I think the longest time that I stuck to a game was one year off and on and that was a MMOPRG (RO or AO, I think).

The only game that I played and still playing is a text-based multi-user dungeon (MUD) called  Armageddon MUD.  It’s a 20 plus year old game that is roleplay enforced, meaning that while you have coded actions, you need to also roleplay out them.  In short, it’s collaborative storytelling.  I think I have played it for 7 years but off and on and my longest live character (it’s perma-death one) lived for close two real life years before I had to store them.  One day, I will write a post dedicated for  Armageddon MUD, something that I said that I was going to do ages ago…

Anyhow, the MUD doesn’t have a client that I can play on, but I use a client called Mudlet:

Screenshot from 2016-05-29 10-44-13

Main screen with Armageddon MUD main screen.

I used three other clients before Mudlet, two for windows back in 2008 – 2009 (MUSH and something else) and one on Ubuntu, which was KClient.  KClient stopped working with  Armageddon MUD after the staff of the MUD moved the server to the cloud.  I did my research from what other players of the MUD were using and found that Mudlet was the most used.  Like most Open Source and Free programs, Mudlet is very customizable but I just use it out-of-the-box.  I have no triggers or keystrokes set up, I don’t need them.  I type out everything.  Someday, I might work on customizing it.

It’s a great program out of the box and you can have multiple profiles and games running at the same time and they can be all saved.  What is great about Mudlet that I like is the fact there is a built-in notepad for notes.  I use it a lot to keep track of things.

I plan to write about MyPaint next week. See you then!

29 May, 2016 06:16PM

Lubuntu Blog: Top Menu for Lubuntu

Thanks to the blog WebUpd8, there’s a new “trick” to add an app menu to the LXDE panel, just like Unity interface has. Check this nice tutorial in our Tips’n’Tricks page.

29 May, 2016 12:39PM

Costales: Ubucon Paris 16.04. Day 1

And first day of the Ubucon Paris!

When I arrived there were a lot of public in all areas.

Install Party area


I was attended a Quesh talk, an introduction to the community.

Quesh's talk


After that Didier told us about the Snappy packages. Looks great.

Didier's talk


Then I was to eat and I saw Nicolas in there. Nicolas is a so great guy. I was speaking with he a few hours.

Nicolas and me


And then, I speak a bit about the 1st uNav's anniversary :) And in there was a big big big surprise from the Ubuntu Party members :)) They come with uNav and Ubuntu presents and they were singing happy birdthay :') Because of 10 years of Ubucon Paris and 1 year of uNav :)) (You guys are the best!).

:')))


And after that, it was the dinner time. So many members in the same restaurant.

Dinner

Presents from Ubuntu Paris


This was a great first day event. And tomorrow will be the last day of the Ubucon Paris.

29 May, 2016 11:11AM by Marcos Costales (noreply@blogger.com)

hackergotchi for VyOS

VyOS

VyOS usage report on AWS

Once in a while people ask how many people are using VyOS on AWS. Since AWS sends us usage reports, this is something we can find out.

Note that this is about the AMI we distribute through the marketplace, we know nothing about instances people deploy from community AMIs.

Anyway, on May the 29th, there were 418 users of the marketplace AMI who ran 466 active instances (roughly 1.1 instance per user).

Breakdown by country

There were users from 32 countries. Countries with the largest numbers of users are the USA (232), Japan (57), United Kingdom (25), and Australia (18). Most other users are in other european countries and a few are in american countries other than the USA and asian countries other than Japan.

Breakdown by instances

The most popular instance type is, unsurprisingly, the free tier eligible t2.micro (202 instances). It is followed by 100 m3.medium, 54 t2.small, 48 t2.medium, and 13 c4.large instances. The remaining larger 49 instances include various large and xlarge ones, including some m4.4xlarge and c3.8xlarge (I sure would like to hear from those people about their use cases!).

Conclusion

Conclusion? What conclusion? I'm not sure if 418 users on AWS is a failure or an achievement. Maybe when we make images for other cloud platforms, we'll have something to compare it with.

29 May, 2016 02:13AM by Yuriy Andamasov

May 28, 2016

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

James Hunt: Procenv 0.46 - now with more platform godness


I have just released procenv version 0.46. Although this is a very minor release for the existing platforms (essentially 1 bug fix), this release now introduces support for a new platform...

Darwin

Yup - OS X now joins the ranks of supported platforms.

Although adding support for Darwin was made significantly easier as a result of the recent internal restructure of the procenv code, it did present a challenge: I don't own any Apple hardware. I could have borrowed a Macbook, but instead I decided to see this as a challenge:

  • Could I port procenv to Darwin without actually having a local Apple system?
 Well, you've just read the answer, but how did I do this?

Stage 1: Docker


Whilst surfing around I came across this interesting docker image:


It provides a Darwin toolchain that I could run under Linux. It didn't take very long to follow my own instructions on porting procenv to a new platform. But although I ended up with a binary, I couldn't actually run it, partly because Darwin uses a different binary file format to Linux: rather than ELF, it uses the Mach-O format.



Stage 2: Travis

The final piece of the puzzle for me was solved by Travis. I'd read the very good documentation on their site, but had initially assumed that you could only build Objective-C based projects on OSX with Travis. But a quick test proved my assumption to be incorrect: it didn't take much more than adding "osx" to the os list and "clang" to the compiler list in procenv's .travis.yml to have procenv building and running (it runs itself as part of its build) on OSX under Travis!

Essentially, the following YAML snippet from procenv's .travis.yml did most of the work:

language: c
compiler:
  - gcc
  - clang
os:
  - linux
  - osx



All that remained was to install the build-time dependencies to the same file with this additional snippet:

before_install:
  - if [[ "$TRAVIS_OS_NAME" == "osx" ]]; then brew update; fi
  - if [[ "$TRAVIS_OS_NAME" == "osx" ]]; then brew install expat check perl; fi


(Note that it seems Travis is rather picky about before_install - all code must be on a single line, hence the rather awkward-to-read "if; then ....; fi" tests).


Summary


Although I've never personally run procenv under OSX, I have got a good degree of confidence that it does actually work.

That said, it would be useful if someone could independently verify this claim on a real system!) Feel free to raise bugs, send code (or even Apple hardware :-) my way!



28 May, 2016 07:44PM by James Hunt (noreply@blogger.com)

hackergotchi for Grml developers

Grml developers

Evgeni Golov: how to accidentally break DNS for 15 domains or why you maybe could not send mail to me

TL;DR: DNS for golov.de and other (14) domains hosted on my infra was flaky from 15th to 17th of May, which may have resulted in undelivered mail.

Yeah, I know, I haven't blogged for quite some time. Even not after I switched the engine of my blog from WordPress to Nikola. Sorry!

But this post is not about apologizing or at least not for not blogging.

Last Tuesday, mika sent me a direct message on Twitter (around 13:00) that read „problem auf deiner Seite?“ or “problem on your side/page?”. Given side and page are the same word in German, I thought he meant my (this) website, so I quickly fired up a browser, checked that the site loads (I even checked both, HTTP and HTTPS! :-)) and as everything seemed to be fine and I was at a customer I only briefly replied “?”. A couple messages later we found out that mika tried to send a screenshot (from his phone) but that got lost somewhere. A quick protocol change later (yay, Signal!) and I got the screenshot. It said "<evgeni+grml@golov.de>: Host or domain name not found. Name service error for name=golov.de type=AAAA: Host found, but no data record of requested type". Well, yeah, that looks like an useful error message. And here the journey begins.

For historical nonsense golov.de currently does not have any AAAA records, so it looked odd that Postfix tried that. Even odder was that dig MX golov.de and dig mail.golov.de worked just fine from my laptop.

Still, the message looked worrying and I decided to dig deeper. golov.de is served by three nameservers: ns.die-welt.net, ns2.die-welt and ns.inwx.de and dig was showing proper replies from ns2.die-welt.net and ns.inwx.de but not from ns.die-welt.net, which is the master. That was weird, but gave a direction to look at, and explained why my initial tests were OK. Another interesting data-point was that die-welt.net was served just fine from all three nameservers.

Let's quickly SSH into that machine and look what's happening… Yeah, but I only have my work laptop with me, which does not have my root key (and I still did not manage to setup a Yubikey/Nitrokey/whatver). Thankfully my key was allowed to access the hypervisor, yay console!

Now let's really look. golov.de is served from from the bind backend of my PowerDNS, while die-welt.net is served from the MySQL backend. That explains why one domain didn't work while the other did. The relevant zone file looked fine, but the zones.conf was empty. WTF?! That zones.conf is autogenerated by Froxlor and I had upgraded it during the weekend to get Let's Encrypt support. Oh well, seems I hit a bug, damn. A few PHP hacks later and I got my zones.conf generated properly again and all was good.

But what had really happened?

  • On Saturday (around 17:00) I upgraded to Froxlor 0.9.35.1 to get Let's Encrypt support and hit Froxlor bug 1615 without noticing as PowerDNS re-reads zones.conf only when told.

  • On Sunday PowerDNS was restarted because of upgraded packages, thus re-reading zones.conf and properly logging:

    May 15 08:10:59 shokki pdns[2210]: [bindbackend] Parsing 0 domain(s), will report when done
    
  • On Tuesday the issue hit a friend who cared and notified me

  • On Tuesday the issue was fixed (first by a quick restore from etckeeper, later by fixing the generating code):

    May 17 14:56:08 shokki pdns[24422]: [bindbackend] Parsing 15 domain(s), will report when done
    

And the lessons learned?

  • Monitor all your domains, on all your nameservers. (I didn't)
  • Have emergency access to all you servers. (I did, but it was complicated)
  • Use etckeeper, it's easier to use than backups in such cases.
  • When hitting bugs, look in the bugtracker before solving the issue yourself. (I didn't)
  • Have friends who care :-)

28 May, 2016 04:15PM

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Costales: Ubucon Paris 16.04. Ubuntu Hour. Day 0

New Ubuntu release, then new awesome Ubucon Paris party!

The Ubuntu Hour, as pre-event of the Ubucon was in the night, then I rented a city bike and I visited Paris in a new way.

I already visited Paris in the past, but this city is always surprised you every time :))

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8


In the afternoon, started the Ubuntu Hour. Finally Ines and Gonzalzo come too from Spain.

Ubuntu Hour Paris


It was a great small event, with good beer and food, but an unique and amazing company :D

Firefox for ever :))

And this weekend... the Ubucon!! :))

All pictures were done with a Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition, without edits.

28 May, 2016 11:52AM by Marcos Costales (noreply@blogger.com)

Michael Lustfield: Long Term Secure Backups

Not that long ago, I managed to delete all off my physical HV hosts, backup server, all external backups, and a bit more. The first question that most people would ask would probably be how that's even possible. That may become a post by itself; it probably won't, though. What really matters is how I can keep this from ever happening again?

I sat down for some time to come up with some requirements, some ideas, and eventually rolled out a backup solution that I feel confident with.

Requirements

To build this backup solution, I first needed to define a set of requirements.

  • No server can see backups from other servers
  • The backup server can not access other servers
  • The backup server must create versioned backups (historical archives)
  • No server can access its own historical archive
  • All archives must be uploaded to an off-site location
  • All off-site backups must enforce data retention
  • The backup server must be unable to delete backups from an off-site location
  • All off-site backups must be retained for a minimum of three months
  • The backup server must keep two years worth of historical archives
  • The entire solution must be fully automated
  • Low budget
  • Can't impact quality of service

Some of these may sound like common sense, but most backup tools, including the big dollar options, don't meet all of them. In some (way too many) cases, the backup server is given access to root (or administrator) on most systems.

The Stack

Deciding how this stack should be contructed was definitely the most time consuming part of this project. I'm going to attempt to lay out what I built in the order of the direction data flows. Wish me luck!

Server to Backup Server

The obvious choice is SSH. It's a standard, reasonably secure, and very easy.

When people do backups with SSH, the typical decision is to have the backup server initiate and control backups, which almost always means the backup server has the ability to log into other servers. This makes your backup server a substantially higher value target for an attacker. Yes, it's horrible if any system gets compromised, but this minimizes the impact and aids in recovery.

Scheduling

Every server has a backup script that runs on a pseudo-random schedule. Because the node name will always be the same and checksums are worthless unless they produce the same value every time, I was able to use the node name to build the backup schedule.

This boils down to what is essentially:

snap:
  cron.present:
    - identifier: snap
    - name: /usr/local/sbin/snap
    - hour: 2,10,18
    - minute: {{ pillar['backup_minute'] }}

The 'backup_minute' is created with ext_pillar. To build the entire ext_pillar is a task for the reader, what matters is:

import zlib
return zlib.crc32(grains['hostname']) % 60

You may notice that using 60 doubles the chance a backup running on the top of the hour. You can feel free to choose 59, but I like nice round numbers that are easy to identify.

SSH Keys

I mentioned that I wanted something 100% automated. I'm a huge fan of Salt and use it in my home environment, so Salt was the only choice for the automation.

A feature of Salt is the Salt Mine. The mine is a way for minions (every server) to report bits of data back to the salt master that can be shared with other systems. I utilized this feature to share root's SSH public key. I also used salt to generate that key if it doesn't already exist.

Here's a mini-snippet for clarification:

root_sshkeygen:
  cmd.run:
    - name: 'ssh-keygen -f /root/.ssh/id_rsa -t rsa -N ""'
    - unless: 'test -f /root/.ssh/id_rsa.pub'

/etc/salt/minion.d/mine.conf:
  file.managed:
    - contents: |
        mine_functions:
          ssh.user_keys:
            user: root
            prvfile: False
            pubfile: /root/.ssh/id_rsa.pub

Overall, this is pretty simple, but amazingly effective.

User Accounts

At this point, all of the servers are ready to back up their data. They just aren't able to yet because the backup server is sitting there empty with no user accounts.

This part is surprisingly easy as well. I simply use salt to create a separate jailed home directory for every server in the environment. The salt master already has the public SSH keys for every server in addition to the servers hostname.

To keep things simple, this example does not include jails.

{% for server, keys in salt['mine.get']('*', 'ssh.user_keys').items() %}
{{ server }}:
  user.present:
    - name: {{ server }}
    - createhome: True
  ssh_auth.present:
    - user: {{ server }}
    - names: [ {{ keys['root']['id_rsa.pub'] }} ]

# Ensures the user directory is never readable by others
/home/{{ server }}:
  file.directory:
    - user: {{ server }}
    - group: {{ server }}
    - mode: '0700'
    - require:
      - user: {{ server }}
{% endfor %}

This will get user accounts created on the backup server, add the SSH public key to the users trusted keychain, and force the users home directory to be set to 700 which prevents other users/groups from accessing the data.

Backup Archives

Now that data is getting from all servers to the backup server, it's time to start having more than a single copy of the data. The best tool I could find for this job was rsnapshot. I simply point rsnapshot at /home (or /srv/jails) and keep data stored where the existing servers can't access it. This means no compromised server can destroy any previous backups.

I broke some of my own rules and have rsnapshot also backing up my pfSense device as well as my Cisco switch configurations. I'll get a better solution in place for those, but that is it's own project.

Ice Ice Baby

At this point, we have a rather complete backup option that meets nearly everything I care about. So far, we're at $0.00 to build this solution. However, off-site backups haven't been included.

Do you want to trust your buddy and arrange to share backups with each other? Hopefully the obvious answer to everyone is an emphatic NO.

The only two reasonable options I found were AWS Glacier and Google Nearline. Because we're talking about data that you should never need to actually access, the two options are very comparable. Google Nearline advertises fastest time to first byte; however, the more you pull down, the slower your retrieval rate is. AWS Glacier advertises cheapest storage, but the faster you want your data, the more you get to pay.

The important thing to remember is that you're dealing with an off-site backup. You are "putting it on ice." If nothing ever breaks, the only time you will ever access this data is to verify your backup process.

I wrote a relatively simple script that runs on a cron (2x/mo) that:

  • Creates a squashfs image of the entire rsnapshot archive
  • Encrypts the quashfs image with a public GPG key
  • Uploads the encrypted image

I created a GPG key pair for this single process, encrypted the private key with my personal key, moved multiple copies (including paper) to various locations, and removed the private key from the server.

Wrapping Up

There are a lot of backup options that exist. I have concerns about nearly every option that exists, including most commercial/enterprise offerings. To have a backup solution that I considered reasonably secure, I had to spend a lot of time thinking through the process and researching many different tools.

I very much hope that what I put here will prove useful to other people trying address similar concerns. As always, I'm more than eager to answer questions.

28 May, 2016 05:00AM

May 27, 2016

Aurélien Gâteau: Mass edit your tasks with t_medit

If you are a Yokadi user or if you have used other todo list systems, you might have encountered this situation where you wanted to quickly add a set of tasks to a project. Using Yokadi you would repeatedly write t_add <project> <task title>. History and auto-completion on command and project names makes entering tasks faster, but it is still slower than the good old TODO file where you just write down one task per line.

t_medit is a command to get the best of both worlds. It takes the name of a project as an argument and starts the default editor with a text file containing a line for each task of the project.

Suppose you have a "birthday" project like this:

yokadi> t_list birthday
                             birthday
ID|Title               |U  |S|Age     |Due date
-----------------------------------------------------------------
1 |Buy food (grocery)  |0  |N|2m      |
2 |Buy drinks (grocery)|0  |N|2m      |
3 |Invite Bob (phone)  |0  |N|2m      |
4 |Invite Wendy (phone)|0  |N|2m      |
5 |Bake a yummy cake   |0  |N|2m      |
6 |Decorate living-room|0  |N|2m      |

Running t_medit birthday will start your editor with this content:

1 N @grocery Buy food
2 N @grocery Buy drinks
3 N @phone Invite Bob
4 N @phone Invite Wendy
5 N Bake a yummy cake
6 N Decorate living-room

By editing this file you can do a lot of things:

  • Change task titles, including adding or removing keywords
  • Change task status by changing the character in the second column to S (started) or D (done)
  • Remove tasks by removing their lines
  • Reorder tasks by reordering lines, this will change the task urgency so that they are listed in the defined order
  • Add new tasks by entering them prefixed with -

Let's say you modify the text like this:

2 N @grocery Buy drinks
1 N @grocery Buy food
3 D @phone Invite Bob
4 N @phone Invite Wendy & David
- @phone Invite Charly
5 N Bake a yummy cake
- S Decorate table
- Decorate walls

Then Yokadi will:

  • Give the "Buy drinks" task a more important urgency because it moved to the first line
  • Mark the "Invite Bob" task as done because its status changed from N to D
  • Change the title of task 4 to "@phone Invite Wendy & David"
  • Add a new task titled: "@phone Invite Charly"
  • Remove task 6 "Decorate living-room"
  • Add a started task titled: "Decorate table" (note the S after -)
  • Add a new task titled: "Decorate walls"

You can even quickly create a project, for example if you want to plan your holidays you can type t_medit holidays. This creates the "holidays" project and open an empty editor. Just type new tasks, one per line, prefixed with -. When you save and quit, Yokadi creates the tasks you entered.

One last bonus: if you use Vim, Yokadi ships with a syntax highlight file for t_medit:

t_medit syntax highlight

This should be in the upcoming 1.1.0 version, which I plan to release soon. If you want to play with it earlier, you can grab the code from the git repository. Hope you like it!

27 May, 2016 11:02PM

Kubuntu: Kubuntu Party 4 – The Gathering of Halflings

Come and join us for a most excellent Gathering of Halflings at Kubuntu Party 4, Friday 17th June 19:00 UTC.

The party theme is all about digging out those half finished projects we’ve all got lying around our Geekdoms, and fetching them along for a Show ‘n’ Tell. As ever, there will be party fun and games, an opportunity to kick back from all the contributing that we do, so join us and  enjoy good company and laughter.

Our last party Kubuntu party 3 proved to be another success, with further improvement and refinement upon the previous Kubuntu Party.

New to the Kubuntu Party scene? Fear not my intrepid guests, new friendships are merely but a few clicks away. Check out our previous story trail.

Kubuntu_Party_3.2

The lessons learned from party  2 had been implemented in party 3. Our main focus is on our guests and their topics of conversation. We didn’t try to incorporate too many things, but simply just let things flow and develop un-conference style. We kept to our plan of closing the party at 22:00 UTC, with a 30 minute over-run to allow people to finish up.  This worked really well and the feedback from the guests was really positive. For the next party we will tighten this over-time further to 15 minutes for close.

We had fun discussing many aspects of computing, including of course lots about Kubuntu. As the party progressed we got into a keyboard geek war, with various gaming keyboards, bluetooth devices, and some amazing back lighting.  However, there simply was nothing to compete with the bluetooth Laser projected keyboard and Mouse that Jim produced, it was awesome!

We also had great fun playing with an IRC Controlled Sphero Robot, a project that Rick Timmis has been working on. The party folks got chance to issue various motion and lighting commands to the Sphero spherical robot. Party goers were able to watch the Robot respond via Rick’s webcam in Big Blue Button.

Rick said

“It was also Awesome seeing that brightly coloured little ball, dashing back and forth at the behest of the party revelers.

It all got rather surreal when Marius broke out his VR Headset, a sophisticated version of the Google Cardboard. The headset enabled Marius to place one of his many (and I mean bags full) of mobile devices in the headset aperture, and vanish into an immersive 3D world.

What are you waiting for ? Book the party in your diary now.

Friday 17th June 19:00 UTC.

Details of our conference server will be posted to #kubuntu-podcast on irc.freenode.net at 18:30 UTC. Or you can follow us on Google+ Kubuntu Podcast and check in on the events page.

 

27 May, 2016 08:34PM

Bryan Quigley: Ubuntu 16.04 LiveCD Memory Usage Compared

The latest Ubuntu LTS is out, so it’s time for an updated memory usage comparison.

1604MemoryCompare

Boots means it will boot to a desktop that you can move the mouse on and is fully loaded.  While Browser and Smooth means we can load my website in a reasonable amount of time.

Takeaways

Lubuntu is super efficient

Lubuntu is amazing in how much less memory it can boot in.  I believe it is still the only one with ZRam enabled by default, which certainly helps a bit.

I actually did the memory usage for ZRam to the nearest MB for fun.
The 32 bit version boots in 224 MB, and is smooth with Firefox at only 240MB!   The 64 bit boots at only 25 MB more (251), but is needs 384 MB to be smooth.

If you are memory limited, change flavors first, 32-bit won’t help that much

Looking just at “Browser and Smooth” because that’s a more clear use-case.  There is no significant memory  difference between the 32 and 64 bit varients of: Xubuntu,  Ubuntu Gnome, Ubuntu (Unity).

Lubuntu, Kubuntu, and Ubuntu Mate do have significant deltas, which let’s explore:
Kubuntu – If you are worried about memory requirements do not use.
Ubuntu Mate – It’s at most a 128MB loss, likely less.  (We did that to 128MB accuracy).
Lubuntu 64 bit is smooth at 384MB.  32 bit saves almost 144 MB!  If you are severally memory limited 32-bit Lubuntu becomes your only choice.

Hard Memory Limit
The 32-bit hard memory requirement is 224 MB. (Below that is panics)
The 64-bit hard memory requirement is 251 MB.  Both of these were tested with Lubuntu.

Check out the 14.04 Post.   I used Virt-Manager/KVM instead of Virtualbox for the 16.04 test.

Extras: Testing NotesSpreadsheet

27 May, 2016 07:31PM

hackergotchi for SparkyLinux

SparkyLinux

APTus 0.2.2

 

There is an update of Sparky APTus Upgrade tool 0.2.2 in Sparky unstable repository.

I have implemented two changes:

1. The changelog option shows upgradable packages, including informations about the version from and to be upgraded to.

APTus Upgrade

2. It shows progress of the upgrading on the bottom of a terminal window now, during the upgrade process.

APTus Upgrade

I put APTus 0.2.2 to the Sparky “unstable” repository to let you test it and make sure that everything works fine, before moving the package to Sparky “testing” repos, so… please test it.

 

27 May, 2016 06:55PM by pavroo

hackergotchi for Maemo developers

Maemo developers

MVVM, Model View ViewModel, with Qt and QML

In the XAML world it’s very common to use the MVVM pattern. I will explain how to use the technique in a similar way with Qt and QML.

The idea is to not have too much code in the view component. Instead we have declarative bindings and move most if not all of our view code to a so called ViewModel. The ViewModel will sit in between the actual model and the view. The ViewModel typically has one to one properties for everything that the view displays. Manipulating the properties of the ViewModel alters the view through bindings. You typically don’t alter the view directly.

In our example we have two list-models, two texts and one button: available-items, accepted-items, available-count, accepted-count and a button. Pressing the button moves stuff from available to accepted. Should be a simple example.

First the ViewModel.h file. The class will have a property for ~ everything the view displays:

#ifndef VIEWMODEL_H
#define VIEWMODEL_H

#include <QAbstractListModel>
#include <QObject>

class ViewModel : public QObject
{
	Q_OBJECT

	Q_PROPERTY(QAbstractListModel* availableItems READ availableItems NOTIFY availableItemsChanged )
	Q_PROPERTY(QAbstractListModel* acceptedItems READ acceptedItems NOTIFY acceptedItemsChanged )
	Q_PROPERTY(int available READ available NOTIFY availableChanged )
	Q_PROPERTY(int accepted READ accepted NOTIFY acceptedChanged )
public:

	ViewModel( QObject *parent = 0 );
	~ViewModel() { }

	QAbstractListModel* availableItems()
		{ return m_availableItems; }

	QAbstractListModel* acceptedItems()
		{ return m_acceptedItems; }

	int available ()
		{ return m_availableItems->rowCount(); }

	int accepted ()
		{ return m_acceptedItems->rowCount(); }

	Q_INVOKABLE void onButtonClicked( int availableRow );

signals:
	void availableItemsChanged();
	void acceptedItemsChanged();
	void availableChanged();
	void acceptedChanged();

private:
	QAbstractListModel* m_availableItems;
	QAbstractListModel* m_acceptedItems;
};

#endif

The ViewModel.cpp implementation of the ViewModel. This is of course a simple example. The idea is that ViewModels can be quite complicated while the view.qml remains simple:

#include <QStringListModel>

#include "ViewModel.h"

ViewModel::ViewModel( QObject *parent ) : QObject ( parent )
{
	QStringList available;
	QStringList accepted;

	available << "Two" << "Three" << "Four" << "Five";
	accepted << "One";

	m_availableItems = new QStringListModel( available, this );
	emit availableItemsChanged();

	m_acceptedItems = new QStringListModel( accepted, this );
	emit acceptedItemsChanged();
}

void ViewModel::onButtonClicked(int availableRow)
{
	QModelIndex availableIndex = m_availableItems->index( availableRow, 0, QModelIndex() );
	QVariant availableItem = m_availableItems->data( availableIndex, Qt::DisplayRole );

	int acceptedRow = m_acceptedItems->rowCount();

	m_acceptedItems->insertRows( acceptedRow, 1 );

	QModelIndex acceptedIndex = m_acceptedItems->index( acceptedRow, 0, QModelIndex() );
	m_acceptedItems->setData( acceptedIndex, availableItem );
	emit acceptedChanged();

	m_availableItems->removeRows ( availableRow, 1, QModelIndex() );
	emit availableChanged();
}

The view.qml. We’ll try to have as few JavaScript code as possible; the idea is that coding itself is done in the ViewModel. The view should only be view code (styling, UI, animations, etc). The import url and version are defined by the use of qmlRegisterType in the main.cpp file, lower:

import QtQuick 2.0
import QtQuick.Controls 1.2

import be.codeminded.ViewModelExample 1.0

Rectangle {
    id: root
    width: 640; height: 320

	property var viewModel: ViewModel { }

	Rectangle {
		id: left
		anchors.left: parent.left
		anchors.top: parent.top
		anchors.bottom: button.top
		width: parent.width / 2
		ListView {
		    id: leftView
			anchors.left: parent.left
			anchors.right: parent.right
			anchors.top: parent.top
			anchors.bottom: leftText.top

			delegate: rowDelegate
		        model: viewModel.availableItems
		}
		Text {
			id: leftText
			anchors.left: parent.left
			anchors.right: parent.right
			anchors.bottom: parent.bottom
			height: 20
			text: viewModel.available
		}
	}

	Rectangle {
		id: right
		anchors.left: left.right
		anchors.right: parent.right
		anchors.top: parent.top
		anchors.bottom: button.top
		ListView {
		    id: rightView
			anchors.left: parent.left
			anchors.right: parent.right
			anchors.top: parent.top
			anchors.bottom: rightText.top

			delegate: rowDelegate
		        model: viewModel.acceptedItems
		}
		Text {
			id: rightText
			anchors.left: parent.left
			anchors.right: parent.right
			anchors.bottom: parent.bottom
			height: 20
			text: viewModel.accepted
		}
	}

	Component {
		id: rowDelegate
		Rectangle {
			width: parent.width
			height: 20
			color: ListView.view.currentIndex == index ? "red" : "white"
			Text { text: 'Name:' + display }
			MouseArea {
				anchors.fill: parent
				onClicked: parent.ListView.view.currentIndex = index
			}
		}
	}

	Button {
		id: button
		anchors.left: parent.left
		anchors.right: parent.right
		anchors.bottom: parent.bottom
		height: 20
	        text: "Accept item"
		onClicked: viewModel.onButtonClicked( leftView.currentIndex );
	}
}

A main.cpp example. The qmlRegisterType defines the url to import in the view.qml file:

#include <QGuiApplication>
#include <QQuickView>
#include <QtQml>
#include <QAbstractListModel>

#include "ViewModel.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
	QGuiApplication app(argc, argv);
	QQuickView view;
	qRegisterMetaType<QAbstractListModel*>("QAbstractListModel*");
	qmlRegisterType<ViewModel>("be.codeminded.ViewModelExample", 1, 0, "ViewModel");
	view.setSource(QUrl("qrc:/view.qml"));
	view.show();
	return app.exec();
}

A project.pro file. Obviously should you use cmake nowadays. But oh well:

TEMPLATE += app
QT += quick
SOURCES += ViewModel.cpp main.cpp
HEADERS += ViewModel.h
RESOURCES += project.qrc

And a project.qrc file:

<!DOCTYPE RCC>
<RCC version="1.0">
<qresource prefix="/">
    <file>view.qml</file>
</qresource>
</RCC>
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27 May, 2016 02:13PM by Philip Van Hoof (pvanhoof@gnome.org)

hackergotchi for ArcheOS

ArcheOS

ArcheOS Hypatia, a new tool for 3D documentation: opnMVG-GUI

In these days we are working very hard to package new software for ArcheOS v. 6 (codename Hypatia). This time we just finished to work on the new GUI +Martin Greca developed for +Pierre Moulon software, openMVG, setting up all the requested dependencies. The result is a new tool for 3D photogrammetry in +ArcheOS: openMVG-GUI. This software can be considered as the evolution of the old Python Photogrammetry ToolBox, but we are currently working to fix some bugs of this application to keep providing it in ArcheOS, since it gave the best results in underground environment documentation.
Here below you an see a fast videotutorial I did for our brand new YouTube channel:



To speed up ArcheOS Hypatia development, we set up an unofficial new repository, which we will use (by now) just internally our society, to be sure that everything works fine before to release it publicly to all the users. Anyway we will share this repository also during the university courses in which we should teach this years, like the one in Evora (Portugal) or the one in Venice, since in this conditions it is possible to work under strict control, avoiding problems in unresolved package dependencies. As soon as the new repository will be hardly tested, we will open it, adding the coordinates to the ArcheOS main branch.

The new GUI (by +Martin Greca) for openMVG (by +Pierre Moulon)
 

PS

If you are interested, there are still available places for the course in Evora (regarding open source technologies and cultural heritage). Here more infos.

Have a nice day!

27 May, 2016 12:14PM by Luca Bezzi (noreply@blogger.com)

May 26, 2016

hackergotchi for Tails

Tails

Call for testing: 2.4~rc1

You can help Tails! The first release candidate for the upcoming version 2.4 is out. Please test it and report any issue. We are in particular interested in feedback and problems relating to:

  • Icedove's automatic configuration wizard. Using it to set up a new account is (most of the time) as easy as entering your email address (and password), and Icedove will configure your account for you.

  • Graphics-related regressions, e.g. if the graphical user interface doesn't seem to start at all (i.e. you cannot reach Tails Greeter).

How to test Tails 2.4~rc1?

Keep in mind that this is a test image. We tested that it is not broken in obvious ways, but it might still contain undiscovered issues.

But test wildly!

If you find anything that is not working as it should, please report to us! Bonus points if you first check if it is a known issue of this release or a longstanding known issue.

Download and install

Tails 2.4~rc1 torrent

Tails 2.4~rc1 ISO image OpenPGP signature

To install 2.4~rc1, follow our usual installation instructions, skipping the Download and verify step.

Upgrade from 2.3

  1. Start Tails 2.3 on a USB stick installed using Tails Installer and set an administration password.

  2. Run this command in a Root Terminal to select the "alpha" upgrade channel and start the upgrade:

    echo TAILS_CHANNEL=\"alpha\" >> /etc/os-release && \
         tails-upgrade-frontend-wrapper
    
  3. After the upgrade is installed, restart Tails and choose Applications ▸ Tails ▸ About Tails to verify that you are running Tails 2.4~rc1.

What's new since 2.3?

Changes since Tails 2.3 are:

  • Major new features and changes

    • Upgrade Tor Browser to 6.0 based on Firefox 45.2. (Closes: #11403).
    • Enable Icedove's automatic configuration wizard. We patch the wizard to only use secure protocols when probing, and only accept secure protocols, while keeping the improvements done by TorBirdy in its own non-automatic configuration wizard. (Closes: #6158, #11204)
  • Bugfixes

    • Enable Packetization Layer Path MTU Discovery for IPv4. If any system on the path to the remote host has a MTU smaller than the standard Ethernet one, then Tails will receive an ICMP packet asking it to send smaller packets. Our firewall will drop such ICMP packets to the floor, and then the TCP connection won't work properly. This can happen to any TCP connection, but so far it's been reported as breaking obfs4 for actual users. Thanks to Yawning for the help! (Closes: #9268)
    • Make Tails Upgrader ship other locales than English. (Closes: #10221)
  • Minor improvements

    • Icedove improvements:
      • Stop patching in our default into Torbirdy. We've upstreamed some parts, and the rest we set with pref branch overrides in /etc/xul-ext/torbirdy.js. (Closes: #10905)
      • Use hkps keyserver in Engimail. (Closes: #10906)
      • Default to POP if persistence is enabled, IMAP if not. (Closes: #10574)
      • Disable remote email account creation in Icedove. (Closes: #10464)
    • Firewall hardening (Closes: #11391):
      • Don't accept RELATED packets. This enables quite a lot of code in the kernel that we don't need. Let's reduce the attack surface a bit.
      • Restrict debian-tor user to NEW TCP syn packets. It doesn't need to do more, so let's do a little bit of security in depth.
      • Disable netfilter's nf_conntrack_helper.
      • Fix disabling of automatic conntrack helper assignment.
    • Kernel hardening:
      • Set various kernel boot options: slab_nomerge slub_debug=FZ mce=0 vsyscall=none. (Closes: #11143)
      • Remove the kernel .map files. These are only useful for kernel debugging and slightly make things easier for malware, perhaps and otherwise just occupy disk space. Also stop exposing kernel memory addresses through /proc etc. (Closes: #10951)
    • Drop zenity hacks to "focus" the negative answer. Jessie's zenity introduced the --default-cancel option, finally! (Closes: #11229)
    • Drop useless APT pinning for Linux.
    • Remove gnome-tweak-tool. (Closes: #11237)
    • Install python-dogtail, to enable accessibility technologies in our automated test suite. (Part of: #10721)
    • Install libdrm and mesa from jessie-backports. (Closes: #11303)
    • Remove hledger. (Closes: #11346)
    • Don't pre-configure the #tails chan on the default OFTC account. (Part of: #11306)
    • Install onioncircuits from jessie-backports. (Closes: #11443)
    • Remove nmh. (Closes: #10477)
    • Drop Debian experimental APT source: we don't use it.
    • Use APT codenames (e.g. "stretch") instead of suites, to be compatible with our tagged APT snapshots.
    • Drop module-assistant hook and its cleanup. We've not been using it since 2010.
    • Remove 'Reboot' and 'Power Off' entries from Applications → System Tools. (Closes: #11075)
    • Pin our custom APT repo to the same level as Debian ones, and explicitly pin higher the packages we want to pull from our custom APT repo, when needed.
    • config/chroot_local-hooks/59-libdvd-pkg: verify libdvdcss package installation. (Closes: #11420)
    • Make Tails Upgrader use our new mirror pool design. (Closes: #11123)

For more details, see also our changelog.

Known issues in 2.4~rc1

  • Longstanding known issues

  • The new version of mesa (#11303) improves the situation on some hardware, but introduces regressions at least on:

    • AMD HD 7770
    • nVidia GT 930M
  • Icedove's autoconfig wizard stalls when probing some domains (#11486) but not all.

26 May, 2016 04:00PM

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S09E13 – Hollywood Nights - Ubuntu Podcast

It’s Episode Thirteen of Season Nine of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Laura Cowen and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

We’re here again, but one of us is not!

In this week’s show:

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our Google+ page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

26 May, 2016 02:00PM

Arthur Schiwon: So long, and thx for all the fish – leaving ownCloud Inc.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/elkaypics/9059309621/">"Firefish in the sky" by  eLKayPics / Lutz Koch, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>

Yes, like Jos, Lukas and Björn I (mostly known for my work on and maintenance of the LDAP backend) am leaving ownCloud Inc. Actually, the 20th of May was already my last day.

Flashback. In late 2011, Frank asked me whether I would like to join a new company that would back the ownCloud project. Back then, I was already contributing to the open source project. Being a passionate Linux user and an active member of the Kubuntu community, I got an amazing opportunity to work on free software on a full time basis. Eventually, my first day at ownCloud Inc. was in February 2012.

Belonging to Generation Y, I value most in work an opportunity to support the common good and make something sustainable. With ownCloud it is possible to give important benefit back to the world. With ownCloud being

we empower everyone to be an owner and stay in control of their data and concentrate on their main goals.

These 4 years with ownCloud Inc. were a great ride for me. Working in a distributed and international setup is not always an easy job, but nevertheless exciting and an extraordinarily fascinating one. I came to be a far better software developer, met fabulous people (with many of whom I became good friends), and together we made the ownCloud project and community grow vastly. Also, it's simply great to work side by side with people like Danimo, Jos and Frank who I met and befriended long before there was any bit of ownCloud.

Ka works and the world moves on
– Wolves of the Calla, Stephen King

I decided to quit because not everything in the ownCloud Inc. company world evolved as I imagined. It's not necessarily bad, only it became clear that for me it is time for a change. No regrets, I have had a splendid time at ownCloud Inc. and am proud to have it as a part of my life and identity.

Leaving the job does not mean leaving the community. I will still be around and help out, for example mentoring the LDAP Provider enhancement. My owncloud.com email address is no longer valid, please see the imprint for my personal one in case you want to contact me there.

Thank you, dear colleagues, and all the best!

26 May, 2016 11:57AM

hackergotchi for Blankon developers

Blankon developers

Mahyuddin Idram Ahmad: Membuat Repository Debian dengan Reprepro



Ilustrasi package debian
Debian Packages


Membangunan Lumbung Paket dengan reprepro, ini bisa untuk debian dan turunannya:

  • Membuat sebuah akun yang bernama arsip


Tambahkan akun baru:
$ sudo adduser arsip
$ su – arsip


  • Install aplikasi-aplikasi pendukung

 $ sudo apt-get install reprepro nginx haveged


  • Mengenerate Kunci GnuPG untuk paket yang akan ditandatangani.

 arsip@repo:~$ gpg --gen-key
Catatan: Ikuti perintah sampai selesai dan hasil dari perintah diatas adalah berkas-berkas yang berada pada ~/.gnupg/
arsip@repo:~$ gpg --gen-key
gpg (GnuPG) 1.4.20; Copyright (C) 2015 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

Please select what kind of key you want:
   (1) RSA and RSA (default)
   (2) DSA and Elgamal
   (3) DSA (sign only)
   (4) RSA (sign only)
Your selection? 1
RSA keys may be between 1024 and 4096 bits long.
What keysize do you want? (2048)
Requested keysize is 2048 bits
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
      <n>  = key expires in n days
      <n>w = key expires in n weeks
      <n>m = key expires in n months
      <n>y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0)
Key does not expire at all
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a user ID to identify your key; the software constructs the user ID
from the Real Name, Comment and Email Address in this form:
    "Heinrich Heine (Der Dichter) <heinrichh@duesseldorf.de>"

Real name: Belajar Repo
Email address: belajar@emhaye.ga
Comment: Repository
You selected this USER-ID:
    "Belajar Repo (Repository) <belajar@emhaye.ga>"

Change (N)ame, (C)omment, (E)mail or (O)kay/(Q)uit? o
You need a Passphrase to protect your secret key.

gpg: gpg-agent is not available in this session
You don't want a passphrase - this is probably a *bad* idea!
I will do it anyway.  You can change your passphrase at any time,
using this program with the option "--edit-key".

We need to generate a lot of random bytes. It is a good idea to perform
some other action (type on the keyboard, move the mouse, utilize the
disks) during the prime generation; this gives the random number
generator a better chance to gain enough entropy.
......................+++++
........+++++
We need to generate a lot of random bytes. It is a good idea to perform
some other action (type on the keyboard, move the mouse, utilize the
disks) during the prime generation; this gives the random number
generator a better chance to gain enough entropy.
+++++
..+++++
gpg: /home/bel/.gnupg/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created
gpg: key 1D8FF8E7 marked as ultimately trusted
public and secret key created and signed.

gpg: checking the trustdb
gpg: 3 marginal(s) needed, 1 complete(s) needed, PGP trust model
gpg: depth: 0  valid:   1  signed:   0  trust: 0-, 0q, 0n, 0m, 0f, 1u
pub   2048R/1D8FF8E7 2016-05-26
      Key fingerprint = 9C0E A1C1 41D4 8295 35FE  D0E1 116B 0A46 1D8F F8E7
uid                  Belajar Repo (Repository) <belajar@emhaye.ga>
sub   2048R/1F828DF8 2016-05-26


  • Konfigurasi Nginx

Buat berkas dan tautkan ke /etc/nginx/site-enabled/arsip
 $ sudo nano /etc/nginx/site-available/arsip
 Isi dengan :
server {
     listen 80;
     server_name $DOMAIN;
     access_log /var/log/nginx/arsip.access.log;
     location / {
          root /home/arsip/repo/;
          index index.html index.htm;
          autoindex on;
     }
}
Lakukan symlink konfigurasi nginx
 $ sudo ln -s /etc/nginx/site-available/arsip /etc/nginx/site-enabled/arsip
Restart Nginx
 $ sudo /etc/init.d/nginx restart

  • Konfigurasi Reprepro

Buat direktory untuk area kerja reprepro
 $ mkdir -p /home/arsip/reprepro/conf
 $ cd /home/arsip/reprepro/conf
Periksa gpg key yang sudah dibuat tadi
 $ gpg --list-keys
/home/bel/.gnupg/pubring.gpg
----------------------------
pub   2048R/1D8FF8E7 2016-05-26
uid                  Belajar Repo (Repository) <belajar@emhaye.ga>
sub   2048R/1F828DF8 2016-05-26


Export pgp/gpg
$ gpg --armor --output arsip-archive-keyring.gpg --export belajar@emhaye.ga
Keguanaan ini untuk didistribusikan ke client atau bisa juga dengan memaketkan dan masukkan ke dalam repo.

Buat berkas distribusi
 $ nano distributions
Isi seperti berikut dan disesuaikan dengan kebutuhan
Origin: Blankon
Label: Blankon
Codename: nusantara
Suite: nusantara
Components: main restricted extras extras-restricted
UDebComponents: main
Architectures: i386 amd64 source
Version: 1.0
Description: BlankOn 1.0 nusantara
# Jangan kasih "-" di kolom Update, nanti paket2 khas2 akan dihapus
Update: merge.nusantara
SignWith: yes
DebIndices: Packages Release . .gz .bz2 tiffany.py
UDebIndices: Packages . .gz .bz2
DscIndices: Sources Release . .gz .bz2 tiffany.py
Contents: udebs nodebs . .gz
ContentsArchitectures: i386 amd64
ContentsComponents: main restricted extras extras-restricted
ContentsUComponents: main
Log: nusantara.log
 --type=dsc changelogs
Buat berkas Options
$ nano options
Isi dengan
basedir /home/arsip/reprepro
confdir /home/arsip/reprepro/conf
dbdir /home/arsip/reprepro/db
outdir /home/arsip/repo/blankon/
gnupghome /home/arsip/.gnupg

Buat berkas Updates
$ nano updates
Isi dengan
Name: merge.nusantara
Suite: nusantara
VerifyRelease: blindtrust
Method: http://$DOMAIN/blankon
Architectures: i386 amd64 source
Components: main restricted extras extras-restricted
Untuk berkas tiffany.py bisa langsung diunduh dari repo github dotovr


  • Cara Penggunaan Repo


a. Update repo
Menjadi Pengguna arsip:
$ sudo su – arsip

Masuk ke reprepro
arsip@repo:$ cd /home/arsip/reprepro/
arsip@repo:$ reprepro -v -v -v update nusantara

b. Membuat berkas indez Packages.gz Source.gz
$ reprepro export nusantara

c. Memasukkab berkas .deb/.Udeb Sources dengan berkas .changes
$ reprepro -C COMPONENT -P PRIORITY -S SECTION include DIST /PATH/TO/PACKAGE.changes

d. Memasuukan paket .deb
$ reprepro -C COMPONENT -P PRIORITY -S SECTION includedeb DIST /PATH/TO/PACKAGE.deb

e. Memasukkan paket debian-installer (udeb)
$ reprepro -C COMPONENT -P PRIORITY -S SECTION includeudeb DIST /PATH/TO/PACKAGE.udeb

f. Memasukkan Kode Sumber
$ reprepro -C COMPONENT -P PRIORITY -S SECTION includedsc DIST /PATH/TO/PACKAGE.dsc

g. Menghapus Paket
$ reprepro remove DIST NAMA_PAKET

h. Membekukan Rilis
Tambahkan opsi ReadOnly dan hilangkan tiffany.py , pada distributions contoh:
Origin: Blankon
Label: Blankon
Codename: nusantara
Suite: nusantara
....
ReadOnly: Yes <-------------

Hasil Pekerjaan:
http://$DOMAIN/blankon/
bisa dipasang di /etc/apt/sources.lis
deb http://$DOMAIN/blankon nusantara main restricted extras extras-restricted
deb-src http://$DOMAIN/blankon nusantara main restricted extras extras-restricted

Keterangan:
deb: Binary Deb
deb-src: Source
http://$DOMAIN/blankon : Alamat Repo
nusantara: Dist/Nama Rilis
main: Repo Utama Bebas
restricted: Repo Utama Terbatas Lisensinya
extras: Repo Komunitas
extras-restricted: Repo Komunitas Terbatas Lisensinya
Dari client coba lakukan update dan pasang package
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install nusantara-keyring

dan install aplikasi-aplikasi lainnya, baik dengan apt-get, aptitude, synaptic atau software
center, jika tidak ada galat/error maka repo sudah siap digunakan.

26 May, 2016 08:54AM by Mahyuddin Idram Ahmad (noreply@blogger.com)

hackergotchi for Grml developers

Grml developers

Michael Prokop: My talk at OSDC 2016: Continuous Integration in Data Centers – Further 3 Years Later

Open Source Data Center Conference (OSDC) was a pleasure and great event, Netways clearly knows how to run a conference.

This year at OSDC 2016 I gave a talk titled “Continuous Integration in Data Centers – Further 3 Years Later“. The slides from this talk are available online (PDF, 6.2MB). Thanks to Netways folks also a recording is available:

This embedded video doesn’t work for you? Try heading over to YouTube.

Note: my talk was kind of an update and extension for the (german) talk I gave at OSDC 2013. If you’re interested, the slides (PDF, 4.3MB) and the recording (YouTube) from my talk in 2013 are available online as well.

26 May, 2016 07:06AM

May 25, 2016

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Jonathan Riddell: Plasma Wayland ISO Checkup

My Plasma Wayland ISOs are building nicely fresh each day.  I asked Betty the fuzzy Guinea Pig to gave one a try today and there’s still obvious bugs like no text on task bar and the blue window bars are back but she’s generally impressed at how this is likely to be a good replacement for X in the near future.

Download 1.0GB ISO

Betty the Fuzzpig Tries Plasma Wayland

 

 

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25 May, 2016 05:26PM

hackergotchi for Blankon developers

Blankon developers

Mahyuddin Idram Ahmad: Kelas Ansible



Kelas Konfigurasi Server Dengan Ansible
Kelas Ansible
Masih mengkonfigurasi dalam jumlah banyak server dengan cara tradisional? Ayo ikut ambil bagian dalam acara keren!

Apasih Ansible itu?
Ansible adalah Configuration Management Tool untuk otomasi proses deploy, konfigurasi dan infrastructure. Salah satu tool untuk wajib bagi DevOps untuk mempercepat kerja.

#MalMinGlib kembali mengadakan kelas  belajar, minggu ini dengan tema  "Configure Server like a Boss with Ansible"

Pemateri
Mahyuddin (DevOps at KodeKreatif

Catat tempat dan waktunya

  • Hari: Sabtu, 28 Mei 2016, Jam 19.30 s.d selesai
  • Lokasi: Rumah BTech, Perum Taman Cimanggu Jl. VIII, No. 14 Cimanggu - Bogor  

25 May, 2016 03:56PM by Mahyuddin Idram Ahmad (noreply@blogger.com)

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Mattia Migliorini: Mobile Apps: Not Just for Games Anymore

There was a time when mobile applications were geared towards entertainment to help pass the time. Mobile apps have come a long way over the past few years with apps that can change your life for the better. Apps can help improve your health, some can help you manage your money, and there are some that can help you manage your business more efficiently. Mobile apps are much more than just silly games, so take a look at some things apps can help you with in your life.

Business

If you run your own business, you know things can be overwhelming sometimes. There are many great mobile apps designed to make running your business easier. Some business related apps can assist with:

  • Offering easy-to-use design options
  • Collecting activity reports
  • Scheduling email campaigns
  • Storing and sharing presentations
  • Scanning and uploading business card details
  • Assigning assignments to staff
  • Time tracking for employees
  • Invoicing

If you need a well-designed mobile app for your business, choose a company such as Y media Labs that will deliver a quality product.

Sleep Trackers

If you’ve ever wondered how well you really sleep at night, there’s an app for that. With a sleep tracker app, you’ll be able to get a better idea about your sleeping habits, how well you sleep, alertness levels, and monitoring the impact of sleep loss. Some sleep trackers have features such as motion-tracking, smart alarm, and a sound recorder that detects snoring and sleep talking. A lot of sleep tracker apps connect to your activity tracker and will also count your steps and show you how active you are during the day.

Money Management

Some people would like to be more organized with their money, but sometimes that’s easier said then done. Money management apps assist with keeping a balanced budget and staying on top of your finances. If you’re looking for the most organization, choose one that will sync all of your accounts including your 401k, bank account, mutual funds, and IRA. With these apps, you can get account totals, budget your money, transactions, and expenses.

Fitness

Most people want to become more active to live a healthy life and there are numerous apps to assist with helping you get back on track. Fitness apps are great for people that need a little extra encouragement to walk extra steps or find easy-to-do workouts they can do at home. Certain apps allow you to log everything you eat during the day and calculate the amount of calories you’ve consumed. Other apps have very short workouts you can do each day that will easily fit into your schedule. Pair your favorite fitness apps with your activity tracker for a more detailed report of your overall fitness.

Navigation

Navigation apps are great because you won’t be required to have a separate GPS system in your car anymore. GPS apps aren’t just good for driving: they also provide great assistance on hikes as well. GPS apps will give you directions, show you maps all over the world, and allow you to customize places you frequent often so you can access them quickly.

Business can ho a long way by staying on top of modern technology and popular apps. You can also organize your life with popular apps and determine the best ways to get healthier. Apps are more than just games these days, so browse your app store and find the best ones that fit into your lifestyle.

The post Mobile Apps: Not Just for Games Anymore appeared first on deshack.

25 May, 2016 08:17AM

Valorie Zimmerman: Rest in peace, Ted Cowan 1926-2016

I've been a bit quiet online lately. A few weeks back, my father had a stroke, from which he seemed to at least partly recover. However, last week we found that he could not recover, and was in fact dying.

He died 12 May 2016. I wrote about that a bit here: http://genweblog.blogspot.com/2016/05/rest-in-peace-ted-cowan-1926-2016.html . I was holding his hand as he passed, as was my sister. We're both happy that he is free of his pain, but are both grieving that both our parents are now dead.

Grieving is strange. Sometimes life seems normal, but sometimes not. So I will help out when I have the energy and interest, and at other times, withdraw and recharge. Talking about this is fine in open channels or privately, if you want. This is not a sensitive subject; we'll all die in the end after all.

25 May, 2016 12:19AM by Valorie Zimmerman (noreply@blogger.com)

May 24, 2016

Full Circle Magazine: Official Ubuntu Stickers From Unixstickers

Need some Ubuntu decoration? Unixstickers, the largest e-commerce for Free Software and Open Source stickers and merchandise have partnered with Canonical, to start offering Ubuntu stickers!

ubuntu stickers and keyboard stickers

They are currently among the very few authorized sellers of Ubuntu swag in the world.

Throughout June, Unixstickers are offering Full Circle readers a 15% discount by using the code UBUNTU15

FULL DISCLAIMER: We make nothing from this. We’re just passing the offer along.

24 May, 2016 05:58PM

Canonical Design Team: Autopilot: benefits of early release

OpenStack is the leading open cloud platform, and Ubuntu is the world’s most popular operating system for OpenStack. Over the past two years we have created a tool that allows users to build an Ubuntu OpenStack cloud on their own hardware in a few simple steps: Autopilot.

This post covers the design process we followed on our journey from alpha to beta to release.

Alpha release: getting the basics right

We started by mapping out a basic Autopilot journey based on stakeholder requirements and designed a first cut of all the necessary steps to build a cloud:

  1. Choose the cloud configuration from a range of OpenStack optionsChoose cloud configuration
  1. Select the hardware the cloud should be built on
    Select the hardware
  1. View deployment status while the cloud is being built
    View deployment status
  1. Monitor the status and usage of the cloud
    Monitor Cloud

After the initial design phase Autopilot was developed and released as an alpha and a beta. This means that for over a year, there was a product to play around with, test and improve before it was made generally available.

Beta release: feedback and improvements

Providing a better overview: increased clarity in the dashboard

Almost immediately after the engineering team started building our new designs, we discovered that we needed to display an additional set of data on the storage graphs. On top of that, some guerilla testing sessions with Canonical engineers brought to light that the CPU and the storage graphs were easily misinterpreted.

dashboard-sketches

After some more competitive research and exploratory sketching, we decided to merge the graphs for each section by putting the utilisation on a vertical axis and the time on the horizontal axis. This seemed to improve the experience for our engineers, but we also wanted to validate with users in usability testing, so we tested the designs with eight participants that were potential Autopilot users. From this testing we learned to include more information on the axes and to include detailed information on hover.

The current graphs are quite an evolution compared to what we started with:
Improved dashboard graphs

Setting users up for success: information and help before the process begins

Before a user gets to the Autopilot wizard, they have to configure their hardware, install an application called MAAS to register machines and install Landscape to get access to Autopilot. A third tool called Juju is installed to help Autopilot behind the scenes.

All these bits of software work together to allow users to build their clouds; however, they are all developed as stand-alone products by different teams. This means that during the initial design phase, it was a challenge to map out the entire journey and get a good idea of how the different components work together.

Only when the Autopilot beta was released, was it finally possible for us to find some hardware and go through the entire journey ourselves, step by step. This really helped us to identify common roadblocks and points in the journey where more documentation or in-app explanation was required.

Increasing transparency of the process: helping users anticipate what they need and when configuration is complete

Following our walk-through, we identified a number of points in the Autopilot journey where contextual help was required. In collaboration with the engineering team we gathered definitions of technical concepts, technical requirement, and system restrictions.

Autopilot walk-through

Based on this info, we made adjustments to the UI. We designed a landing page  with a checklist and introduction copy, and we added headings, help text, and tooltips to the installation and dashboard page. We also included a summary panel on the configuration page, to guide users through the journey and provide instant feedback.

BR_step-by-step

GA release: getting Autopilot ready for the general public

Perhaps the most rewarding type of feedback we gathered from the beta release — our early customers liked Autopilot but wanted more features. From the first designs Autopilot has aimed to help users quickly set up a test cloud. But to use Autopilot to build a production cloud, additional features were required.

Testing without the hardware: try Autopilot on VMware

One of the biggest improvements for GA release was making it easy to try Autopilot, even for people that don’t have enough spare hardware to build a cloud. Our solution: try Autopilot using VMware!

Supporting customisation:  user-defined roles for selected hardware

In the alpha version a user could already select nodes, but in most enterprises users want more flexibility. Often there are different types of hardware for different roles in the cloud, so users don’t always want to automatically distribute all the OpenStack services over all the machines. We designed the ability to choose specific roles like storage or compute for machines, to allow users to make the most of their hardware.

Machine roles

Allowing users more control: a scalable cloud on monitored hardware

The first feature we added was the ability to add hardware to the cloud. This makes it possible to grow a small test cloud into a production sized solution. We also added the ability to integrate the cloud with Nagios, a common monitoring tool. This means if something happens on any of the cloud hardware, users would receive a notification through their existing monitoring system.

BR-Nagios

The benefits of early release

This month we are celebrating another  release of OpenStack Autopilot. In the two years since we started designing Autopilot, we have been able to add many improvements and it has been a great experience for us as designers to contribute to a maturing product.

We will continue to iterate and refine the features that are launched and we’re currently mapping the roadmap for the months ahead. Our goal remains for Autopilot to be a tool for users to maintain and upgrade an enterprise grade cloud that can be at the core of their operations.

 

24 May, 2016 04:30PM

Svetlana Belkin: System 76 Lemur Unboxing and Initial Use Review

Like many Ubuntu users, I drooled all over getting a System 76 laptop or desktop.  They are built by Ubuntu users for Ubuntu users.  I finally decided to buy one a few weeks ago.

Unboxing

Two Fridays ago, I ordered a System 76 Lemur and it finally came yesterday just 15 minutes before I had to go to work.  I only had time to photograph the unboxing and put it to charge.

The specs on this Lemur are:

Screenshot from 2016-05-21 16-36-24A few upgrades from the base.

The unopened box. I love the fact that it says, “Unleash your potential”. And about the sharp objects to open the packaging is true, you only need to use a sharp object to get the box itself open.

2016-05-23 12.42.21

The packaging See I mean?

The box I simply love how they designed in the inside. It makes me want to create!

Below are some of the images from the unboxing and all the images are here:

Initial Use Review

Just before I went to sleep,  I started it up.  The first time installation is simpler because Ubuntu is already installed and the laptop only needs to know what you need to have it they way you want.  I also ran my  restore script from the backup that I created from my desktop. I allowed it to run when I was sleeping.

Today when I logged in, I found an error in my script, fixed it, committed it, and pushed it on GitHub.  Because of this error, I had to install the needed programs, but that was no biggie.  I haven’t used so much yet (I’m writing this on my desktop) but it runs very smoothly and quietly.

Keyboard and Trackpad

I like the keyboard, it’s sized perfectly for the laptop and my hands.  Typing on it is very smooth.  The only bad thing is that it is not backlit.

Using the trackpad is also smooth and it’s prefect fit.  I also like that there is buttons for left and right click.

Fans

The fans are very, very quiet.  No other comment needed.

Body

It’s weight is 3 pounds, but I have no comment.  I love the finish on the laptop.  It’s a gray finish and I thought it was brighter.  I also love how the System 76 logo is raised a bit and centered.  The only problem that I have is that (to me) there is a bit too much flex on the top.

Hopefully in a week, I will have a post after one week of usage in order for me to talk about how the laptop runs.

24 May, 2016 03:19PM

Mattia Migliorini: Why more women are needed in the tech industry

With each moment that passes the technology industry becomes bigger and more integral to the fabric of daily life; there’s not a sector that hasn’t benefitted from it. Most people rely on technology every time they require entertainment, or to answer a question. One aspect of the tech industry that many could do without, though, is its apparent gender bias, and while there are more women undertaking roles than in previous years, there is still a long way to go before quotas are fulfilled, and women feel as though they’re truly a part of the tech sector.

The issue of diversity in the tech industry

There’s little getting around it; the tech industry is still frequently considered a male dominated sector, perhaps not helped by the fact that less women today then 20 years ago are choosing to join the profession, and some 56% are choosing to leave the profession within ten years.
While it’s certainly true that there are still a great many women choosing, and gaining, high-powered positions ranking above their male counterparts, many consider their appointment to be too little, too late. So, what is it that’s putting women off from applying for positions within the tech industry? There are certainly more than enough women that are qualified to undertake such roles, after all. Perhaps the biggest factor discouraging women from applying for jobs within the technology industry is its male dominated image; gender stereotypes have an incredible power over young girls choosing to study certain subjects, and they’re often put off so-called male courses such as math, science, and engineering. In addition, many women already believe that the industry is a sexist one, with 52% claiming that they’re aware of the gender pay-gap, and 73% discouraged from working in a typically sexist environment. These statistics are staggering, but the stereotype needn’t exist at all.

Regardless of the reasons why women are put off working within the technology industry one thing is for sure; the tech sector is quickly becoming the world’s top industry, with numerous careers branching out from its humble beginnings. Diversity is, and should be, a major concern for the industry moving forward. Is it possible to attract more women to work with technology?

An asset to the industry: Attracting women to the tech sector

While women may not be at the fore of the technology sector there are some incredibly strong and talented females heading the field, and inspiring young women to follow their dreams regardless of the odds seemingly stacked against them. Ginni Rometty, the CEO of IBM, for example, is an incredible role model for young girls hoping to break into formation technology and engineering, while the co-founder and chair of technology giant HTC is a woman, named Cher Wang. The truth is that women bring a whole range of assets to the technology industry, including the assurance of future talent, diversity and empowerment, and skills that may otherwise be overlooked. Technology impacts everybody, so surely it makes sense for women to hold the same power as men within the industry?

Much is being done to change the ways in which the technology sector operates, with improved education and training for employees, championed role models, the public challenging of negative stereotypes, and better mentoring opportunities being offered by a number of companies; this ensures that younger women, and school-aged girls, are encouraged into the industry from their youth, and inspired to do everything they can to achieve success. Indeed, there are a great many organizations currently raising concerns surrounding diversity in the tech industry, including Diversity Inc., which champions the rights of women and minority groups, as wel as celebrating their importance in a variety of sectors. CEO Luke Visconti is often quick to highlight industry failings and successness in his column, ‘Ask the White Guy’, while carefully unpicking arguments against the inclusion of certain groups in the workplace, and championing those inspirational few. Now is also the time to take note of the big companies pledging to make changes, including social media platform Pinterest, which very publically addressed its commitment to minorities, and pledged to increase its numbers of female and underrepresented employees during 2016. Such influence and dedication to change is difficult to ignore, but will it make any difference?

WHile much is being done to address the issue of gender-bias in the technology industry it is clear that there’s still a long way to go; women are still too easily discouraged from choosing ‘male dominated’ subjects that lead into such careers, and are under-supported in the roles they do manage to claim. Thanks to the influence of the women currently succeeding in the field, as well as organizations such as Diversity Inc., though, it is hoped that more women will pick up the mantle and make a name for themselves in the sector; their inclusion is long overdue, and most welcome.

The post Why more women are needed in the tech industry appeared first on deshack.

24 May, 2016 12:39PM

hackergotchi for Maemo developers

Maemo developers

I/O bursts with QEMU 2.6

QEMU 2.6 was released a few days ago. One new feature that I have been working on is the new way to configure I/O limits in disk drives to allow bursts and increase the responsiveness of the virtual machine. In this post I’ll try to explain how it works.

The basic settings

First I will summarize the basic settings that were already available in earlier versions of QEMU.

Two aspects of the disk I/O can be limited: the number of bytes per second and the number of operations per second (IOPS). For each one of them the user can set a global limit or separate limits for read and write operations. This gives us a total of six different parameters.

I/O limits can be set using the throttling.* parameters of -drive, or using the QMP block_set_io_throttle command. These are the names of the parameters for both cases:

-drive block_set_io_throttle
throttling.iops-total iops
throttling.iops-read iops_rd
throttling.iops-write iops_wr
throttling.bps-total bps
throttling.bps-read bps_rd
throttling.bps-write bps_wr

It is possible to set limits for both IOPS and bps at the same time, and for each case we can decide whether to have separate read and write limits or not, but if iops-total is set then neither iops-read nor iops-write can be set. The same applies to bps-total and bps-read/write.

The default value of these parameters is 0, and it means unlimited.

In its most basic usage, the user can add a drive to QEMU with a limit of, say, 100 IOPS with the following -drive line:

-drive file=hd0.qcow2,throttling.iops-total=100

We can do the same using QMP. In this case all these parameters are mandatory, so we must set to 0 the ones that we don’t want to limit:

   { "execute": "block_set_io_throttle",
     "arguments": {
        "device": "virtio0",
        "iops": 100,
        "iops_rd": 0,
        "iops_wr": 0,
        "bps": 0,
        "bps_rd": 0,
        "bps_wr": 0
     }
   }

I/O bursts

While the settings that we have just seen are enough to prevent the virtual machine from performing too much I/O, it can be useful to allow the user to exceed those limits occasionally. This way we can have a more responsive VM that is able to cope better with peaks of activity while keeping the average limits lower the rest of the time.

Starting from QEMU 2.6, it is possible to allow the user to do bursts of I/O for a configurable amount of time. A burst is an amount of I/O that can exceed the basic limit, and there are two parameters that control them: their length and the maximum amount of I/O they allow. These two can be configured separately for each one of the six basic parameters described in the previous section, but here we’ll use ‘iops-total’ as an example.

The I/O limit during bursts is set using ‘iops-total-max’, and the maximum length (in seconds) is set with ‘iops-total-max-length’. So if we want to configure a drive with a basic limit of 100 IOPS and allow bursts of 2000 IOPS for 60 seconds, we would do it like this (the line is split for clarity):

   -drive file=hd0.qcow2,
          throttling.iops-total=100,
          throttling.iops-total-max=2000,
          throttling.iops-total-max-length=60

Or with QMP:

   { "execute": "block_set_io_throttle",
     "arguments": {
        "device": "virtio0",
        "iops": 100,
        "iops_rd": 0,
        "iops_wr": 0,
        "bps": 0,
        "bps_rd": 0,
        "bps_wr": 0,
        "iops_max": 2000,
        "iops_max_length": 60,
     }
   }

With this, the user can perform I/O on hd0.qcow2 at a rate of 2000 IOPS for 1 minute before it’s throttled down to 100 IOPS.

The user will be able to do bursts again if there’s a sufficiently long period of time with unused I/O (see below for details).

The default value for ‘iops-total-max’ is 0 and it means that bursts are not allowed. ‘iops-total-max-length’ can only be set if ‘iops-total-max’ is set as well, and its default value is 1 second.

Controlling the size of I/O operations

When applying IOPS limits all I/O operations are treated equally regardless of their size. This means that the user can take advantage of this in order to circumvent the limits and submit one huge I/O request instead of several smaller ones.

QEMU provides a setting called throttling.iops-size to prevent this from happening. This setting specifies the size (in bytes) of an I/O request for accounting purposes. Larger requests will be counted proportionally to this size.

For example, if iops-size is set to 4096 then an 8KB request will be counted as two, and a 6KB request will be counted as one and a half. This only applies to requests larger than iops-size: smaller requests will be always counted as one, no matter their size.

The default value of iops-size is 0 and it means that the size of the requests is never taken into account when applying IOPS limits.

Applying I/O limits to groups of disks

In all the examples so far we have seen how to apply limits to the I/O performed on individual drives, but QEMU allows grouping drives so they all share the same limits.

This feature is available since QEMU 2.4. Please refer to the post I wrote when it was published for more details.

The Leaky Bucket algorithm

I/O limits in QEMU are implemented using the leaky bucket algorithm (specifically the “Leaky bucket as a meter” variant).

This algorithm uses the analogy of a bucket that leaks water constantly. The water that gets into the bucket represents the I/O that has been performed, and no more I/O is allowed once the bucket is full.

To see the way this corresponds to the throttling parameters in QEMU, consider the following values:

  iops-total=100
  iops-total-max=2000
  iops-total-max-length=60
  • Water leaks from the bucket at a rate of 100 IOPS.
  • Water can be added to the bucket at a rate of 2000 IOPS.
  • The size of the bucket is 2000 x 60 = 120000.
  • If iops-total-max is unset then the bucket size is 100.

bucket

The bucket is initially empty, therefore water can be added until it’s full at a rate of 2000 IOPS (the burst rate). Once the bucket is full we can only add as much water as it leaks, therefore the I/O rate is reduced to 100 IOPS. If we add less water than it leaks then the bucket will start to empty, allowing for bursts again.

Note that since water is leaking from the bucket even during bursts, it will take a bit more than 60 seconds at 2000 IOPS to fill it up. After those 60 seconds the bucket will have leaked 60 x 100 = 6000, allowing for 3 more seconds of I/O at 2000 IOPS.

Also, due to the way the algorithm works, longer burst can be done at a lower I/O rate, e.g. 1000 IOPS during 120 seconds.

Acknowledgments

As usual, my work in QEMU is sponsored by Outscale and has been made possible by Igalia and the help of the QEMU development team.

igalia-outscale

Enjoy QEMU 2.6!

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24 May, 2016 11:47AM by Alberto Garcia (agarcia@igalia.com)

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: The versioning of the Ubuntu UI Toolkit

In the recent days there was lots of discussion about the versioning of the Ubuntu UI Toolkit. Finally we thought that the topic deserves a dedicated blog post to clarify the situation and resolve some misunderstandings.

Let’s start with  the background story.

The UITK releases, before we opened the 1.3 branch for development, was mainly targeting touch devices and their main objective was to offer more or less a complete API set for mobile application development. The versions prior to 1.3 were working on the desktop too, but they were clearly suboptimal for those use cases because for example they were missing mouse and keyboard capabilities

With the 1.3 development branch we set on a single goal. With this release the UITK will offer a feature complete API set for devices of all form factors with all kinds of capabilities. It means that applications built for the 1.3 UITK will work on a touchscreen device with a small display just as on a large screen with mouse and keyboard. It was a very ambitious plan, but absolutely realistic.

We have decided that we follow the "release early and release often" principle so developers will have time to adapt their applications to the new APIs. At the same time we promised that whatever API we release will be supported for at least one minor revision and we will follow a strict and developer friendly deprecation process if needed.

It means that even if the source code of the 1.3 UITK is not frozen, all APIs released in it are stable and safe to use.

So far we did keep our promise. There was not a single application in the store or in the archive  that suffered functional regression due to an intentional API break in the UITK. True, UITK has bugs. True, one can argue about if changing the color palette classifies to be an API change or not.  Not to mention the awkward situation when an application takes advantage of a bug in the UITK and loses that advantage when the bug gets fixed. Also we have seen broken applications because they were using private APIs and properties.

It is absolutely true that using a frozen API set is the safest for application developers. No doubt about it and I do hear the opinions that some developers wish to see a fully frozen 1.3 UITK. We do wish the same.

Now, let us visit this idea and check a bit around. I do promise that folding out the big picture will help everyoneunderstand why the UITK is developed in the way it is.

So, let us say we freeze the 1.3 UITK today.  In that case we need to open the 1.4 branch plus we would certainly open a Labs space. Before going any further let me list what kind of changes we do in the UITK codebase:

  1. Critical bug fixes. Right, I am sure that nobody argues the fact that once we found or reported a critical bug we have to push a fix to the supported releases as soon as possible. At this very moment we have a good number of open bug reports. About 80% of the merged branches and patches to the UITK code are bug fixes. With every OTA release we push out 10-20 critical bug fixes. It means that each bugfix needs to target both the frozen and the development branch, plus the labs space. From the point of bug fixes it is important that the supported branches of the UITK do not diverge too much. One may say 1.3 should be frozen, so no bug fixes should go there, eventually some showstoppers. However we have way too many of those fixes which we must land in 1.3 as well. Fragmenting the UITK and so the platform at this early stage might fire back later.

  2. Feature gaps for convergence. As we have stated many times, the convergence features are not yet completely implemented in the UITK. We do wish they were, but sadly  they are not. It means that almost every day we push something to the UITK codebase that makes that feature gap smaller. In case we freeze the 1.3 UITK we can push these convergence features only to the 1.4 and the labs space. That would mean that all core applications would need to migrate to the 1.4 UITK because they are the primary consumers of the convergence feature.

  3. UITK uses dynamic styling of components. The styles are loaded from a specified theme matching the version of the UITK module the component is imported from. This is necessary because themes implement UX including behavior and looks, so just like functions in the API developers may rely on theming when designing their apps, or even adding custom components. We are using the property cache to detect the version of the module. As we are not planning any API additions to StyledItem, moving to 1.4 would require us to declare a dummy property just to be able to detect that the component is imported from the 1.4 version. Introducing a property just to be able to differentiate doesn’t sound really professional. Yes, the version could be set in the component itself, but that would immediately break the symlink idea (second time) and beside that, noone guarantees that the version will be set prior to the style document name, so a dual-style loading can be eliminated. We had this API in the first version of the sub-theming, but was removed, and perhaps it was the only API break we did in 1.3 so far.

  4. Unit tests are also affected. They need to be duplicated at the least when components in 1.4 diverge in behavior and features - but even bugs in superclass A altered in 1.4 may affect component B which is not altered and still fail test cases. On the other hand Autopilot is not so flexible. While the CPOs (Custom Proxy Objects, the classes that represent QML components in Python test cases) basically do not care about the import versions, they do have problems with the API differences, and it is not so easy doing differentiation for the same component to detect which API can be used in what context. We’ve been discussing to try to move as many tests as we can to QTest (unit tests), however there are still tons of apps using Autopilot, and we have to provide and maintain CPOs for those.

  5. The upcoming Labs space will hold the components and APIs that we do not promise to be stable and are subject to change even in one minor version. We need this space to experiment with features and ideas that would not be possible in a stable branch.

If we look at this picture we will see immediately that the further we go with closing the feature gaps the more we diverge from the codebase of the frozen 1.3.  Note that code change does not mean API change! We are committed to stable APIs not to stable code. Freezing code is a luxurious privilege of very mature products. Implementing new features and fixing critical bugs in two different branches would mean that we need to fork the UITK. And that itself would bring issues which have not been  seen by many. A good example for this is the recently discovered incompatibility issue between the old style header and the refactored (to be implemented in C++) AdaptivePageLayout. To gain the performance improvements in 1.3 it’s necessary to change the component completely. Furthermore if only 1.4 started off with a rewritten AdaptivePageLayout fixing bugs would consume considerable time in two entirely different codebases at that point.

It is important to note that the UITK comes in a single package in a single library. Forking the UITK package is clearly not an option. The applications do not have control over their dependencies. Also creating multiple libraries for different versions is not an option either. Providing the UITK in a single plugin has some consequences. Many of the developers asked why there are no more frequent minor version bumps. The answer is simple. As long as all the versions come in a single plugin, each and every minor release will increase the memory consumption of the UITK. Bumping the UITK version 3-4 times a year would end up in a 10-12 times bigger memory footprint in just two years. We do not want that. And most probably when we “release” 1.4, we will need features from Qt 5.6, which means we need to bump imports in all our QML documents to 2.6. So it is a nice theory but it is not a working one.

To summarize the whole story, we are where we are for good reason. The way the UITK is versioned, packaged and provided to the application developers is not accidental. At the same time we do admit that after measuring the costs and benefits of different paths, we had to make compromises. The present so called rolling 1.3 release is safe to use, the APIs provided by the UITK are all stable and supported. But as it is still evolving and improving  it is a good idea to follow the news and announcements of the SDK developer team. We are available pretty much 24/7 on the #ubuntu-app-devel Freenode channel, on ubuntu-phone@lists.launchpad.net mailing list, on Telegram and on all commonly used public platforms. We are happy to listen to you and answer your questions.

24 May, 2016 06:34AM by Zoltán Balogh (zoltan.balogh@canonical.com)

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 465

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #465 for the weeks of of May 2 – 15, 2016, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Chris Guiver
  • Chris Sirrs
  • Aaron Honeycutt
  • Simon Quigley
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

24 May, 2016 12:47AM

hackergotchi for Ubuntu

Ubuntu

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 466

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #466 for the week May 16 – 22, 2016, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Chris Guiver
  • Chris Sirrs
  • Simon Quigley
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

24 May, 2016 12:33AM by lyz

May 23, 2016

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Stuart Langridge: The importance of URLs

“You don’t control Xykon! He controls you!”
“Like I said: subtle.”

Redcloak, The Order of the Stick

Lots of discussion about progressive web apps recently, with a general consensus among forward-thinking web people that this is the way we should be building things for the web from now on. Websites that work offline, that deal well with lie-fi1, that are responsive, that are progressive, that work everywhere but are better on devices that can cope with the glory. Alex Russell, who originally coined the term, talks about PWAs being responsive, connectivity independent, fresh, safe, discoverable, re-engageable, installable, linkable, and having app-like interactions.

We could discuss every part of that description, every word in that definition, for hours and hours, and if someone wants to nominate a pub with decent beer then I’m more than happy to have that discussion and a pint while doing it. But today, we’re talking about the word linkable.

Linkability

Jeremy tweeted:

Strongly disagree with Lighthouse wanting “Manifest’s display property set to standalone/fullscreen to allow launching without address bar.”

Jeremy Keith

A little background

First, a little background. Google Chrome attempts to detect whether the website you’re looking at “qualifies” as a Progressive Web App, because if it does then they will show an “install to home screen” banner on your second visit. This is a major improvement over the previous state of a user having to manually install a site they like to their home screen by fishing through the menus2 or using the “add to home screen” button in iOS Safari3. The Chrome team have then created Lighthouse, a tool which invokes a Chrome browser, checks whether a site passes their checks for “this looks like a PWA”, and returns a result.

So Jeremy’s point is this: Lighthouse is declaring that to be a valid PWA, you have to insist that when you’re added to the home screen, you stop showing the URL bar. And he doesn’t agree, because

I want people to be able to copy URLs. I want people to be able to hack URLs. I’m not ashamed of my URLs …I’m downright proud.

Jeremy Keith

This is inspirational stuff, and it’s true. URLs are important. Individual addressability of parts on the web is important.

However. (You knew there was a “however” coming.) Whether your web app shows a URL bar is not actually a thing about that web app.

A little more background

A bit more background. In order to qualify as a progressive web app, you have to provide a manifest.4 That manifest lists various properties about this web app which are useful to operating systems: what its human-readable name is, what a human-readable short name for it is, what its icon should be, a theme colour for it, and so on. This is all good.

But the manifest also lists a display_mode, defined in the spec as “how the web application is being presented within the context of an OS (e.g., in fullscreen, etc.)” Essentially, the options for the display mode are fullscreen (the app will take all the screen; hardware keys and the status bar will not be shown), standalone (no browser UI is shown, but the hardware keys and status bar will be displayed), and browser (the app will be shown with normal browser UI, ie. as a normal website).

Now we see Jeremy’s point. Chrome propose that you only qualify as a “real” PWA if you request “fullscreen” or “standalone” mode: that is, that you hide the URL bar. Jeremy says that URLs are important; they’re not a thing to hide away or to pretend that don’t exist. And he has a point. The hackability of URLs is surprisingly important, and unsurprisingly dismissed by app developers who want to lock down the user experience.

But, and this is the important point, whether a web app shows its URLs is not a property of that app. It’s a property of how that app’s developer thinks about the web.

Property versus preference

If Jeremy and I were both to work on a website, and then discuss what should be in the manifest, we’d agree on what the app’s name was, what a shortened name was, what the icon is. But we might disagree on whether the app should show a URL bar when launched. That disagreement isn’t about the app itself; it’s about whether you, the developer, think it’s OK to hide that an app is actually on the web, or whether you should proudly declare that it’s on the web. That doesn’t differ from app to app; it differs from developer to developer. The app manifest declares properties of the app, but the display property isn’t about the app; it’s about how the app’s developer wants it to be shown. Do they want to proudly declare that this app is on the web and of the web? Then they’ll add the URL bar. Do they want to conceal that this is actually a web app in order to look more like “native” apps? Then they’ll hide the URL bar. The display property feels rather less like it’s actually tied to the app, and rather more like it should be chosen at “add-to-home-screen” time by the user; do you, the bookmarking user, prefer to think of this as a web thing? Include the URL bar. Do you want to think of it as an app which doesn’t involve the web? Hide the URL bar. It’s a preference. It’s not a property.

On the desktop

The above argument stands alone. But there are additional issues with having a URL bar showing on an added-to-home-screen web app. We should discuss these separately, but here I have them in the same essay because it’s all relevant.

The additional issue is, essentially, this. On my desktop — not my phone — I add an app to my “home screen”. This might add it to my desktop as a shortcut icon, or to my Start Menu, or in the Applications list, or all of the above, depending on which OS I’m on.5 If that PWA declares itself as being standalone then how to handle it is obvious: open it in a new window, with no URL bar showing. Similarly, fullscreen web apps launched from an icon should be full screen. But what do we do when launching a browser display-mode web app on a desktop?

Since we’re launching something indistinguishable from just another browser tab, it should launch a browser tab, right? I mean, we’re opening something which is essentially a bookmark. But… wouldn’t it feel strange to you to pick something from your app menu or an icon from your desktop and have it just open a browser tab? It would for me, at least. So maybe we should launch a new browser window, with URL bar intact, as though you’d clicked “open in new window” on a link. But then I’d have a whole new browser window for something which doesn’t really deserve a whole new window; it’s just one more web page, so why does it get a window by itself? I manage my browser windows according to project; window A has tabs relevant to project A, window B has tabs relevant to project B, and so on. I don’t want a whole new window, and indeed I have extensions installed so that links which think they deserve a new window actually get a new tab instead.

It’s not very clear what should happen here. The whole idea of launching a website from an OS-level icon doesn’t actually mesh very well at all with the idea of tabbed browser windows. It does mesh well with the 2002-era idea of a-new-browser-window-for-every-URL, but that idea has gone away. We have tabbed browsing, and people like it.6

The Chrome team’s idea, that basically you can’t add an “OS-level bookmark” for a website which wants to be treated as a website, avoids these problems.

Jeremy’s got a point, though. Hiding away URLs, pretending that this thing you’re looking at is a “native” app, does indeed sacrifice one of the key strengths of the web — that everything’s individually addressable. You can’t bookmark the “account” page in Steam, or the “settings” window in Keynote or Word or LibreOffice. With the web, you can. That’s a good thing. We shouldn’t give it up lightly. But you already can’t do that for apps which use web technologies but pretend to be native. If Word or iTunes used a WebView to render its preferences dialog, would it be good if you could link directly to it with a URL like itunes://settings? Yes it would. Would it be good if the iTunes user interface had a URL bar at the top showing that URL all the time? Not really, no.

There is a paternalism discussion, here. URLs are a good thing about the web; the addressability of parts is a good thing about the web. People don’t necessarily appreciate that. How much effort should we put into making this stuff available even though people don’t want it, because they’re wrong to not want it? Do we actually know better than they do? I think: yes we do.7 But I don’t know how important that is, when we can also win people over to the web by pretending that it’s native apps, which is what people wrongly want.

Conclusions

On balance, therefore, I approve of the Lighthouse team’s idea that you don’t qualify as an add-to-home-screen-able app if you want a URL bar. I can see the argument against this, and I do agree that we’re giving up something important, something fundamental to the web by hiding away URLs. But I think that wanting to see the URL is not a property of an app; it’s a property of how you personally want to deal with apps. So browsers should, when adding things to the home screen, pretend that display:browser actually said display:standalone, but give people who care the ability to override that if they want. And if we want more people to care, then that’s what evangelism is for; having individual app developers decide how they want their app to be displayed just leads to fragmentation. Let’s educate people on why URLs are important, and then they can flip a switch and see the URLs for everything they use… but until we’ve convinced them, let’s not force them to see the URLs when what they want is a native-like experience.

  1. Jake Archibald eloquently names lie-fi as that situation where your phone claims to have a connection but actually it doesn’t, the lying sack of dingo’s entrails that it is, and just spins forever when you tell it to connect to a website. If you’ve ever toggled a device into airplane mode and back out again, you know what we’re talking about
  2. although the Chrome approach is not without its problems
  3. which is obscure enough that Matteo Spinelli made a library to show a pointer to the add-to-home-screen button; the library is wonderful, don’t get me wrong, but it ought to not need to exist
  4. If you don’t know how to create one, see the manifest generator that Bruce and I created
  5. and it should be noted that basically nobody actually handles PWAs properly on desktop yet; it’s all about mobile. But desktop is coming, and we’ll need to solve this.
  6. Whether tabbed browsing actually makes conceptual sense is not up for discussion, here; we’ve collectively decided to use it, much as we’ve collectively decided that one-file-manager-window-per-folder isn’t the way we want to go either.
  7. Hubris is a great idea. The Greeks taught us that.

23 May, 2016 11:22PM

hackergotchi for VyOS

VyOS

Have you got any spare hardware for the VyOS testbed?

We've had an idea to put together a testbed for testing new VyOS releases for a while, as having different people test different interoperability issues is not always all that handy, but we didn't have a place to host it, so we never even made any specific plans.

However, syncer (the other guy at Sentrium) offered to host it in his closet, so we can think about details.

The idea is to setup a testbed with a few VyOS boxes and hardware by various vendors where we can test if everything is working as expected. Ideally we'd like to offer access to every contributor so they can live test their changes, but for this we'll have to come up with some reservation system (do you know of any ready to use implementations?).

But first of all, we need hardware. We've already got an EdgeRouterLite, probably a Cisco 870, and a RasperryPi for a host simulator. If you've got a device you can part with, consider donating or leasing it to us.

What we definitely don't have:

  • Some Juniper (SRX or smaller JSeries perhaps?)
  • Some Mikrotik
  • Cisco ASA (5505?)
  • One more managed switch
  • A couple more rpi's or other small boards for host simulators

If you've got anything else you think if worth adding to the testbed, let us know.

23 May, 2016 09:51PM by Yuriy Andamasov

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Daniel Pocock: PostBooks, PostgreSQL and pgDay.ch talk

PostBooks 4.9.5 was recently released and the packages for Debian (including jessie-backports), Ubuntu and Fedora have been updated.

Postbooks at pgDay.ch in Rapperswil, Switzerland

pgDay.ch is coming on Friday, 24 June. It is at the HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil, at the eastern end of Lake Zurich.

I'll be making a presentation about Postbooks in the business track at 11:00.

Getting started with accounting using free, open source software

If you are not currently using a double-entry accounting system or if you are looking to move to a system that is based on completely free, open source software, please see my comparison of free, open source accounting software.

Free and open source solutions offer significant advantages: flexibility, businesses can choose any programmer to modify the code, and use of SQL back-ends, multi-user support and multi-currency support are standard. These are all things that proprietary vendors charge extra money for.

Accounting software is the lowest common denominator in the world of business software, people keen on the success of free and open source software may find that encouraging businesses to use one of these solutions is a great way to lay a foundation where other free software solutions can thrive.

PostBooks new web and mobile front end

xTuple, the team behind Postbooks, has been busy developing a new Web and Mobile front-end for their ERP, CRM and accounting suite, powered by the same PostgreSQL backend as the Linux desktop client.

More help is needed to create official packages of the JavaScript dependencies before the Web and Mobile solution itself can be packaged.

23 May, 2016 05:35PM

Jono Bacon: Moving on From GitHub

Last year I joined GitHub as Director Of Community. My role has been to champion and manage GitHub’s global, scalable community development initiatives. Friday was my last day as a hubber and I wanted to share a few words about why I have decided to move on.

My passion has always been about building productive, engaging communities, particularly focused on open source and technology. I have devoted my career to understanding the nuances of this work and which workflow, technical, psychological, and leadership ingredients can deliver the most effective and rewarding results.

As part of this body of work I wrote The Art of Community, founded the annual Community Leadership Summit, and I have led the development of community at Canonical, XPRIZE, OpenAdvantage, and for a range of organizations as a consultant and advisor.

I was attracted to GitHub because I was already a fan and was excited by the potential within such a large ecosystem. GitHub’s story has been a remarkable one and it is such a core component in modern software development. I also love the creativity and elegance at the core of GitHub and the spirit and tone in which the company operates.

Like any growing organization though, GitHub will from time to time need to make adjustments in strategy and organization. One component in some recent adjustments sadly resulted in the Director of Community role going away.

The company was enthusiastic about my contributions and encouraged me to explore some other roles that included positions in product marketing, professional services, and elsewhere. So, I met with these different teams to explore some new and existing positions and see what might be a good fit. Thanks to everyone in those conversations for your time and energy.

Unfortunately, I ultimately didn’t feel they matched my passion and skills for building powerful, productive, engaging communities, as I mentioned above. As such, I decided it was time to part ways with GitHub.

Of course, I am sad to leave. Working at GitHub was a blast. GitHub is a great company and is working on some valuable and important areas that strike right at the center of how we build great software. I worked with some wonderful people and I have many fond memories. I am looking forward to staying in touch with my former colleagues and executives and I will continue to be an ardent supporter, fan, and user of both GitHub and Atom.

So, what is next? Well, I have a few things in the pipeline that I am not quite ready to share yet, so stay tuned and I will share this soon. In the meantime, to my fellow hubbers, live long and prosper!

23 May, 2016 03:20PM

May 22, 2016

Svetlana Belkin: What Programs Do I Use: GitHub’s Atom

As I said in this post, I’m doing a series of blog posts about the programs that I use on Ubuntu.

My first program that I want to talk about is GitHub’s Atom code editor.  I tired a few code editors (mostly with working with Markdown) and none of them is as awesome as Atom.  Why?  See below:

Screenshot from 2016-05-21 17-45-46 Screenshot from 2016-05-21 17-48-01

In the first screenshot  on the left, you can see that I’m working on Ubuntu Membership workshop (that I plan to do a bit before the global jam or after it). The first panel on the left is the file manger for that specific project.  The middle is the editor where there is syntax highlighting happening for Markdown.  And on the last panel on the right, is the Markdown preview for that file.

In the next and final screenshot on the right, you can see the same file being worked on but in the middle panel shows what I have added (in green), deleted (in red), and changed (dark yellow) after the last commit.  It’s a handy feature.

I only have used Atom for a week now, and I don’t have much to say since I only work with Markdown files at the moment.  But that will change as I start to work on my coding projects, as stated here.  I know that Jono Bacon wrote an amazing post on Atom where I know that I will check out those other features and maybe report on them here.  Most likely, I will have a follow up post once I start to code more.

As for this series, I will post one post every Sunday until I run out of programs to talk about.  The next one that I will talk about is Mudlet, a M* client that I use to play my favorite text-based online roleplay.

See you next week!

22 May, 2016 04:18PM

May 21, 2016

hackergotchi for VyOS

VyOS

VyOS 1.1.7 OVA image for VMware

Back then we used to make OVA images, which didn't attract any interest at the time and the idea was abandoned.

Perhaps it's time to do it again and gauge the interest. We made one for 1.1.7 and it's available from http://packages.vyos.net/iso/release/1.1.7/vyos-1.1.7-amd64-signed.ova and from the mirrors.

This OVA uses an embedded signature made with an object code signing certificate issued to Sentrium, to simplify deployment.

This one was made with VMware and uses VM hardware version 9. It should be compatible with ESXi 5.5 and later and VMware Workstation 9 and later.

Theoretically it may work in other systems with OVA support, but from my experience OVF, despite technically standardized, doesn't work that way. Please tell us if you've had any luck with it and if you know how to make it friendly to multiple systems.

21 May, 2016 03:36PM by Yuriy Andamasov

May 20, 2016

hackergotchi for Ubuntu developers

Ubuntu developers

Aaron Honeycutt: Ubuntu Touch on a tablet… it’s a N7 not a M10

So I’ve been using Ubuntu on my Nexus 7 (2013 Wi-Fi) for a few weeks. I’ve hit a few bugs here and there since I’ve been on rc-proposed (weekday images) pretty much the whole time. One of the most annoying ones was that the Unity 8 Shell would not rotate from landscape to portrait, if you ever used the Nexus 7 2012 or 2013 then you know this tablet is weighted for perfect portrait use. While apps have been able to do it for while now the Apps Scope as well as the other scopes have not till last week.

screenshot20160406_152708460   <– landscape                                                                                       screenshot20160504_104032104                                                                                                                                                                                                   portrait –>

 

 

 

 

I’ve seen other bigger bugs get fixed last week alone! Like the Camera app giving a error message after *trying* to record a video:

screenshot20160505_150027205

Or the Camera app not rotating correctly:

screenshot20160505_145933408

I’ve tried to use the tablet for my work on Kubuntu:

Editing files on the docs.kubuntu.org server with nano 🙂

screenshot20160412_182609436

Also having a tablet has helped me test my app uBeginner for AdaptivePageLayout: (insert shameless self promotion!)

screenshot20160423_193017448

I also enabled Read and Write Mode so I can install other applications like VIM for the hell of it lol

screenshot20160424_192216498

I’ve also found that Hangouts Video calling works in the default Ubuntu Web Browser:

screenshot20160512_194207585

while in Convergence Mode! no less! Only issue was that I could not switch to the front camera and I had a bit of echo on my end. With that I’ll so some more Convergence screenshots:

screenshot20160509_160640021 screenshot20160509_160629670 screenshot20160505_210405301

The next post will have some of my progress (thanks to the awesome other developers) on my new project uCycle. 🙂

 

20 May, 2016 10:49PM

hackergotchi for Tails

Tails

\"Tails

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Releases\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Tails 0.16~rc1 was released on December 14th." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The Tails 0.16 release is scheduled for the first half of January." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "People\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "We received 66 reports through Whisperback." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The forum activity has been steadily high: 1128 messages, 177 signed by " "Tails." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Some of us went to [29c3](https://events.ccc.de/congress/2012/)." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Code\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Many dictionaries for supported languages [were " "installed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/spell-checker)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A ?bug concerning memlockd [was " "fixed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/only-one-memlockd)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The regular GnuPG agent [was " "added](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/regular-gnupg-agent)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The automatic update feature of Iceweasel extensions [was " "disabled](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/disable-iceweasel-extensions-auto-update)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The move to using `live-boot` version 3 [was worked " "on](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/live-boot-3.x)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The [Minitube](http://flavio.tordini.org/minitube) Youtube client [was " "installed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/minitube)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The Iceweasel Add-on bar [was " "hidden](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/just_hide_iceweasel_add-on_bar) " "by default." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The work on a better power-off button [was completed and " "merged](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=commit;h=0217cf30ad95efe798529aadcde952b49976c839)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A bug concerning the `--media` option of live-persist [was " "fixed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/strict_live-persist_media)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The `~/Persistent` directory [was " "added](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/persistent-directory-in-places) " "to the *Places* menu of *GNOME* and *GtkFileChooser*." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The `xul-ext-monkeysphere` extension [was " "removed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/disable-iceweasel-extensions-auto-update)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The *News* section of the website [was " "configured](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/news-as-homepage) " "as the ?homepage of Iceweasel." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The Entropy Key daemon `ekeyd` [was " "installed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/ekeyd)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A new version of the [MAT](https://mat.boum.org/) [was " "announced](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-December/002355.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation and website\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Guidelines for writing " "documentation for Tails were " "written." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The documentation of our release process was " "[improved](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=commit;h=ef5f98e69e41794abcd8748529d81965d4aa8274)." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Tails

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "November was pretty intense a month for Tails, including two major " "releases. It was not the happiest though, due to personal issues, unresolved " "conflicts within the team and server hard disks dying." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Anyhow, Tails' life does go on. Here is a report of what happened last " "month." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Releases\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails 0.14 was released on November 13th and 0.15 was " "released on November 28th. From now on, we should be " "in a position to stick to the 6-weeks release " "cycle we have been aiming at for a while." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The Tails 0.16 release is scheduled for the first half of January." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "People\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails has been started and successfully connected to the Tor network around " "83731 times in November. That makes a boot every 31 seconds on average. This " "number is an approximation from the requests made for the security " "announcements feed. The later is retrieved by Tails after being connected to " "Tor to eventually encourage users to update." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "41 reports were received through WhisperBack." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The forum activity is still very high: 903 messages, 151 signed by Tails." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Code\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Some preliminary work to ?add VirtualBox host " "software has [been " "done](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/virtualbox-host)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Useless cookies exceptions in iceweasel were " "[removed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/remove-cookies-exceptions)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Preliminary support for some ?OpenPGP " "SmartCards was " "[added](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/OpenPGP-SmartCart)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "LCD-optimized fonts settings were " "[implemented](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/nicer-fonts)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Do not run setupcon on " "X](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/no-console-setup-on-X)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Better support for printers that us the IJS driver [was " "added](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/hpijs)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The Monkeysphere XUL extension and the I2P console bookmark, that were " "broken by the move to TorBrowser patches, " "[were](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/monkeysphere_post_torbrowser) " "[fixed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/i2p_console_bookmark)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The Tails OpenPGP Applet was " "[fixed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/gpgApplet_menu_in_bottom_panel) " "to be compatible with the Windows camouflage mode." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Custom APT sources handling was [fixed for release " "candidates](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/handle_apt_sources_for_rc)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Bridge mode was ?found to have problems with Tor " "restarts and " "[fixed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/bridge_mode_vs_tor_restarts). " "While we were at it, some refactoring happened, and code was extracted into " "a shell library to avoid too much duplication in the source tree." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Iceweasel 10.0.11esr-1 + TorBrowser patches was build." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A font for Sinhala script (spoken by 15-20 millions of people, mainly in Sri " "Lanka) was " "[added](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/sinhala-font)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The Unsafe Browser window name was " "[set](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/unsafe_browser_name) " "to... *Unsafe Browser*." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Discrepancies between the various build setups used by Tails developers was " "discovered and " "[fixed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/install-tasksel-standard-task)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "APT pinning was [cleaned " "up](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/cleanup-apt-pinning)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Our fake FireGPG package was " "[removed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/remove-fake-firegpg), " "eventually. RIP." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The SCIM was " "[fixed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/scim-in-autostarted-iceweasel) " "in the autostarted web browser." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Work " "[started](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/set-wireless-devices-state) " "to ?set wireless devices state to something sane at boot time." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The move to using a recent `live-boot` was almost " "[completed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/live-boot-3.x), " "but blocked due to a bug we found in upstream `live-boot`. A patch is in " "the works." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Work to ?install a password manager was " "[started](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/install-password-manager)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A poedit 1.5 backport that fixes a long-standing annoying bug was " "[prepared](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/poedit-1.5) " "and tested." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Preliminary steps towards ?installing the Minitube YouTube " "client were " "[walked](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/minitube). " "Many thanks to Alessandro Grassi for starting this effort, and going on with " "it!" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The `Persistent` directory is now [displayed in the Places " "menu](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/persistent-directory-in-places)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Work has " "[started](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/news-as-homepage) " "to ?set iceweasel homepage to Tails news." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Shutdown messages were " "[fixed](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=commit;h=ef5d24c144976d3f0b1c0f64b6533c9d304a9b95) " "to talk of DVD, not of CD." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "IPv6 was " "[disabled](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/bugfix/disable-IPv6) " "to workaround ?a recently discovered leak." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Work towards a ?better power off button is " "[ongoing](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/better_power_off_button)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "?obfsproxy support was " "[added](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/obfsproxy)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A number of candidate branches for 0.15 were " "[merged](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/devel)." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation and website\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The Tails website now has a Press & media information page." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The News can now be " "[translated](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002136.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "As ?planned, the website was " "[locked-down](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002234.html) " "a bit more." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "On-going discussions\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Improve Polipo " "configuration](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002008.html), " "[switch to " "Privoxy](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002029.html), " "or drop it all?" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Progress report on the automated test " "suite](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002014.html) " "triggered some discussion." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Helping adrelanos to proper copyright and licensing practices when [forking " "Tails documentation " "pages](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002054.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Testing incremental " "updates](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002108.html) " "and " "[tails-create-iuk](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002128.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Benchmarking " "Redmine](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002157.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[How to implement remembering installed " "packages?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002160.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Supporting " "EntropyKey](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002195.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Promoting Persistence " "features](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002197.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[What to do with Liferea " "Cookies?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002209.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[If/How to ship the Minitube native YouTube " "client?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002257.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[What's the safest value to set the time from Tor " "consensus?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002228.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Stop shipping bugs/* and todo/* in " "ISO?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-November/002235.html)" msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Tails

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "October 2012 has seen the highest activity on Tails development mailing-list " "since it is publicly archived (September 2010). This reflects how much work " "is done to slowly make Tails better and better. More details follow." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Releases\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails 0.14 is on its way. A first release candidate was released on the 12th " "with pretty good reactions so far. This new version will catch up with long " "awaited, unspectacular but important features, and fix an impressive amount " "of small bugs." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "While testing the first release candidate, we found I2P unable to work " "properly. The source of the problem was ultimately determined to [a random " "bit " "flip](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001829.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "What should have been an easy update to the next \"Entreprise Stable " "Release\" of Iceweasel (Debian unbranded Firefox) left us cold with a " "half-working Torbutton. This required us to hurry on fixing this standing " "problem: we now have our own APT repository and a custom Iceweasel package " "which includes TorBrowser patches for anonymity." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "This got included in the second release candidate, released on the 30th, " "together with translation updates. Unless a major issue shows up, Tails 0.14 " "should be released on November, 6th." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "People\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails has been started and successfully connected to the Tor network around " "80.420 times in September. That makes a boot every 33 seconds on " "average. This number is an approximation from the requests made for the " "security announcements feed. The later is retrieved by Tails after being " "connected to Tor to eventually encourage users to update." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "50 reports were received through WhisperBack." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The forum activity is still really intense: 1542 messages, 161 signed by " "Tails." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Code\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The ?bug that sometimes made Iceweasel open PDF with Gimp or MP3 with " "Audacity has been fixed." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Whisperback " "1.6.1](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=whisperback.git;a=blobdiff;f=ChangeLog;hb=dbd977a33b;hpb=610dec83f) " "fixed the inability to resend a bug after a network problem and some other " "minor issues." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "?Network Manager connections can now persist across " "sessions." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Default to use ftp.us.debian.org as a Debian mirror in the Vagrant build " "system](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=commit;h=5944fe4e8dc)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Finally got to nail the ?issue with the current memory wipe " "system." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Meanwhile, [a new solution was proposed using the `hugetlbfs` kernel " "mechanism](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001810.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Finally implemented ?support for multiple kernels meaning proper support " "for multiple CPUs and cores and more than 3 GB of memory. " "This also required a [new version of liveusb-creator to fix some concurrency " "issues](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001791.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "?Support for public key encryption in " "gpgApplet has been merged, finally!" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "?Yelp does not crash on internal links " "anymore." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Persistence for browser bookmarks is ready for Tails " "0.15](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001884.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Add and get good reports for a ?Japanese input " "method, will be included in Tails 0.14." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Add an ?input system for Korean, should be " "included in Tails 0.15." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "`tordate` was broken with Tor 0.2.3. [A fix has quickly been " "found](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001881.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Display \"Unsafe browser\" instead of \"Iceweasel\" in the Unsafe " "browser](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/unsafe_browser_name)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Preliminary support for obfsproxy " "bridges](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/obfsproxy)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Quite some work happened on ?setting up our own APT " "repository (Puppet modules hacking and documentation, " "among others)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Add our custom APT repository in " "Tails](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/apt-repository)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Get our own Iceweasel packages with TorBrowser " "patches](git://labs.riseup.net/tails_iceweasel.git) and [include them in " "Tails](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/torbrowser) " "0.14." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "?Get more test results for OpenPGP smartcards " "support." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "?Add vendor-specific dpkg origin information." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "?Do not use pdnsd anymore." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[New progress has been made on Tails automated test " "suite](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/automated_tests/cucumber)." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation and website\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Document the upcoming Network Manager persistence." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Document the new support for public key encryption in the OpenPGP applet, " "and generally improve this part of the documentation along the way." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Fix links to the Universal USB Installer." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Consistently use long GnuPG key ID format in our examples." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Many improvements to French and Portuguese translations." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Documented more of Tails current development process: roles, " "processes and the release " "schedule." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Infrastructure\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Our own APT repository `deb.tails.boum.org` has gone live on the 24th. This " "already enables us to use big custom packages (Iceweasel). In the mid-term, " "we will be able to remove binary packages from our main Git repository. And " "on the long run, this will enable more control over our freezes, as well as " "proper source distribution." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "In order to ?get commit announcements back on " "IRC, we have setup an instance of GitBot " "on `#tails-dev`. Unfortunately, this did not work as expected, and " "`repo.or.cz` admins explained us that they do not support commit " "notifications for mirror projects. Next steps are left to be determined." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "On-going discussions\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Is there any advantage in faking user agent in " "tordate?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001732.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[How about authenticated " "NTP?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001743.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Mockups for a revamped Tails Greeter, resulting in several " "comments](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001781.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Alan should be taking over maintainance of the Metadata Anonymization " "Toolkit](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001789.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Is Tails interested in some boot scripts from " "Whonix?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001803.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Tails website " "license?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001805.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Which Pidgin protocols should be considered " "\"safe\"?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001830.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Dependencies between persistence " "options](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001887.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Block/unblock wireless devices at boot " "time?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001753.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Disable FireWire et al. at boot " "time?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001847.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Tests of two-layered virtualized " "systems](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-October/001950.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Funding\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Unfortunately, sponsor Bravo is not able to fund as much as promised " "earlier. There might still be funds for some hardware. We'll see how it " "goes." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Tails

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "September, 2012 has been pretty busy for Tails. Here is a report of what " "happened." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Releases\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails 0.13 was released on September 18th. See the announcement for more " "details." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The release came out one week late compared to the initial schedule. This " "is due to an unexpected late arrival of the updated Iceweasel ESR backported " "packages." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The next release, labeled 0.14, should be released by the end of October. A " "first release candidate should be available for testing on the 9th." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "People\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails has been started and successfully connected to the Tor network around " "71.000 times in September. That makes a boot every 36 seconds on " "average. This number is an approximation from the requests made for the " "security announcements feed. The later is retrieved by Tails after being " "connected to Tor to eventually encourage users to update." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "47 reports were received through WhisperBack." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The forum activity went pretty crazy with 1038 new messages, 156 of them " "signed by \"Tails\". Not the highest signal/noise ratio in history, though." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Code\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A fix was merged for the ?slow browsing experience of the " "documentation available inside " "Tails systems." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Some progress was made on the front of ?supporting multiple " "kernels, that should lead a future version of Tails to use " "multiple cores and more than 3GB of memory eventually, as well as fixing " "most of the dreaded \"not all memory is wiped at shutdown\" bug." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A first attempt to tackle ?persistent connections in Network " "Manager is available for reviews." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "'Old style' ?PC speaker is now disabled to " "prevent loud, unexpected beeps." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The [Unsafe Web browser now disables all Iceweasel " "extensions](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=commit;h=64da202)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The ?firewall is now configured using `ferm`." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The [build process is now more likely to fail instead of letting errors " "slip](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001634.html) " "when hooks fail." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Tails (`devel` Git branch) is now ?using Tor 0.2.3." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "One of the new feature of Tor 0.2.3 is network stream isolation. Subsequent " "?anonymity enhancements have been implemented " "and will be available in Tails 0.14." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The ?readahead breakage resulting in a " "noticeable pause during startup has been fixed." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The [Vagrant-based build system was " "optimized](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001594.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Some more work has been done in [improving handling of init " "scripts](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001643.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The bug that made the ?default search engine for some languages fallback on " "Google " "has been fixed." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Some [more build system optimization related to package " "installation](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001718.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "An [input method for Japanese has been " "added](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001719.html) " "and will be in Tails 0.14." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "?Programs used by default to open downloaded files were often " "sub-optimal. The issue is now " "fixed." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A [bug resulting in whisperback reporting an inexistent " "error](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001621.html) " "during the send process has been fixed." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "On the OpenPGP smartcards support front, some backports were prepared and " "are being tested." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "On-going discussions\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Two contributors interested in working on Tails server showed " "up](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001559.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Some [feedback and comments about the 'uwt' " "script](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001575.html) " "shipped in Whonix." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Experiments on backporting " "Iceweasel](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001600.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[What should be done with the system date when it's off any reasonable " "limit?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001637.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Schedule for the upcoming 0.14 " "release](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001647.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Block/unblock wireless " "devices?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001648.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Researching best way to implement persistent browser " "bookmarks](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001644.html), " "with some first patches from Alessandro Grassi." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Should Tails ship a \"download " "manager\"?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001670.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Should PCMCIA / ExpressCard / Firewall be " "deactivated?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001671.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[What should be the default web browser " "homepage?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-September/001672.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation and website\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The documentation has received several small improvements in the following " "areas:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "List what can be done when Tails does not start." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Better phrasing of the disclaimer about TrueCrypt." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Adjust TrueCrypt documentation for the current boot menu." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "Specify what happens to the persistent volume when using the clone option of " "the installer." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Be more explicit of what should be done after installing Tails." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Link more appropriately the Torrent OpenPGP signature." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "An important amount of (still invisible) work has been done to replace the " "forum with a Q&A-style (like StackOverflow) web application that would suit " "our needs (and possibly the Tor project's ones -- we'll see)." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Translations\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The French translations has received a sturdy stream of updates." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The website is currently at:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "FR: 79% translated, 1% fuzzy" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "PT: 50% translated, 1% fuzzy" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "ES: 28% translated, 3% fuzzy" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "DE: 13% translated, 1% fuzzy" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Infrastructure\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The `tails::whisperback::relay` Puppet class was brought into working " "state. This allowed us to setup additional WhisperBack relays: fail-over " "should now ensure bug reporting is possible most of the time. See Git " "repository at: `git://webmasters.boum.org/tails-puppet-module-tails`" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The server that will be dedicated to Tails development needs was delivered " "and plugged in the SeaCCP colocation. Many thanks to our friends at Riseup, " "who helped a lot through the whole process, and to the Tor project, who " "supports us once again by funding the server hosting! Debian Wheezy was " "installed." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A Redmine install was setup at Riseup Labs to allow us to evaluate it. " "Thanks a lot, again!" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Funding\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The discussions with sponsor Bravo are going well. It's likely that around " "20 days of work for two developers will be funded by the end of November." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Tails

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Here is the report of the many things that happened around Tails in August, " "2012." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails has been started and successfully connected to the Tor network around " "64.000 times in August. That makes a boot every 41 seconds on average. We " "know this since Tails checks if a new release is available once the network " "is connected each boot." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Releases\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Version 0.13 is coming! We have released the first release candidate, along " "with a call for testing." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Unless something nasty happens, Tails 0.13 should be released on September " "11th." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Tails summit\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Seven mighty Tails developers gathered for a ten-day summit, including a day " "trip to the sea. The meeting was exhausting, inspiring and productive. We " "have tied up some discussions that had a year long history, made plans for " "the future, and worked on a few annoying bug fixes and cool hacks." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "So, what happened during Tails summit? (Not in any relevant order.)" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: '* ' msgid "Had an 'About us' go-around." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "" "* Done a 2D barometer about 'Tails in 3 years', with some questions on\n" " the future of Tails.\n" "* Shared knowledge about what has been done on automated testing so far.\n" "* Tried to use a forked version of memtest86+ to wipe memory.\n" "* Started a 'wipe_memory' module for GRUB.\n" "* Decided to go for OSQA to replace the forum.\n" "* Rewrote the documentation for new translators.\n" "* Clarified our roadmap, at least until the 1.0 release.\n" "* Worked on WhisperBack 1.6, which uses an external, dedicated\n" " GnuPG keyring.\n" "* Finalized the hardware configuration of our future server, lizard, and\n" " discussed the basics of the sysadmin work.\n" "* Finalized and merged the `bugfix/remove_ttdnsd_from_the_loop` branch.\n" "* Merged the `feature/wireless-regulation` branch.\n" "* Merged the `feature/precompiled-locales` branch.\n" "* Started a `feature/do-not-build-the-forum` branch and got it merged.\n" "* Labelled a bunch of tasks and bugs as \"broken windows\".\n" "* Designed an amazing release plan.\n" "* Wrote documentation about \"Tails does no boot\" and created a \"Known\n" " issues\" page.\n" "* Pinged Jake about disabling firewire and the likes.\n" "* Tried to define meaningful/efficient organisation methods.\n" "* Created an internal private chatroom for emergencies.\n" "* Finished some ooold work:\n" " - `feature/firewall_lockdown`\n" " - `feature/assymetric_gpgApplet` (sic!)\n" "* Killed some bugs:\n" " - `todo/hide_FoxyProxy_unreachable_proxy_message`.\n" " - the unusable 'TailsData' volume is now hidden in Nautilus.\n" "* Done some initial work on `todo/persistence_preset_-_NM_connections`.\n" "* Created an internal document repository for private stuff.\n" "* More or less defined our target userbase.\n" "* Prepared a new contract proposal for sponsor Bravo.\n" "* Thought through our initial strategy with respect to Tor stream " "isolation.\n" "* Drafted a plan for VPN support.\n" "* Calculated statistics on the state of translations on the website.\n" "* Created a Twitter account.\n" "* Designed a plan for advertising test images to more people.\n" "* Decided to use torbrowser, and have rough plan for the next things to " "do.\n" "* Crippled a laptop due to coffee.\n" "* Outlined what Tails needs from a task manager application.\n" "* Benchmarked several task managers.\n" "* Handled conspiranoia about our website.\n" "* Clarified our position and priorities regarding Tails' network " "fingerprint,\n" " both on the \"local\" side (ISP, local router) and \"remote\" side (Exit " "node,\n" " web server).\n" "* Decided to accept Bitcoin donations (stay tuned!) but we still do not\n" " have the resources to accept cash or Paypal donations.\n" "* Tried to send a postcard to jvoisin but missed a postal address,\n" " *sigh*.\n" "* Suffered and went to the dentist and suffered again. Now pending.\n" "* We had a \"food master challenge\".\n" "* We generated new GnuPG keys and signatures.\n" "* We tried with limited success to use hardware GnuPG cards.\n" "* We reported bugs in Vidalia.\n" "* Did not upload any package to Debian.\n" "* Researched how to properly fix a minor bug in Vidalia's AppArmor policy.\n" " Proposed a plan to upstream AppArmor.\n" "* Published our Puppet modules.\n" "* Extracted some more package sources from our Git repository\n" " for our future APT repositories.\n" "* Wrote a collaboration proposal to Reporters without Borders.\n" "* Answered conspiranoiac forum posts.\n" "* Saw the years-old Metacity bug fixed in Wheezy.\n" "* No one got hurt.\n" "* Did not drink that much, thanks to antibiotics (at least for some of " "us).\n" "* We agreed on calling our sponsors 'Alpha', 'Bravo' and so on.\n" "* We have some preliminary fillings for the next round of the grant\n" " proposal from sponsor Charlie.\n" "* We refined how changes were incorporated into Tails.\n" "* Decided to switch to a time-based release schedule.\n" " Some details have to be sorted out, still.\n" "* Thought of a plan to improve the tails-greeter GUI and user experience.\n" "* Discussed tools used for user support, how we handle the workload,\n" " how we will.\n" "* Discussed how we can make paid workers and volunteers (who sometimes are\n" " the same persons, really) work together happily.\n" "* Clarified loooads of development processes so that we avoid the need for " "a\n" " project manager, and know better how to get changes into Tails.\n" " Expect us to fill the contribute section of the Tails website with that.\n" "* Designed \"Release Managers\" and \"Welcome and Annoying Nitpicker\"\n" " roles, and scheduled the first shifts.\n" "* Discussed possibly moving to the `tails.is` domain.\n" "* Have a list of people to reach for each existing language team or\n" " language requests.\n" "* Wrote a list of what we have done.\n" "* Wrote that we wrote a list of what we have done.\n" "* We eventually shut up and went `$HOME`.\n" "* After some serious drifts we decided not writing anything anymore on\n" " the \"done during the summit\" list.\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Outreach and support\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "As we would like to get more people to test our release candidates, we " "decided to experiment with relaying our news on Twitter. You can follow the " "project at ." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We acknowledge that Twitter is inferior in terms of freedom to many other " "Internet protocols and tools. But the content is public and will be reserved " "for announcements. It feels like an acceptable trade-off to spread our " "information where people read it." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Again, please note this is not a channel to contact us. We also have no " "intents to spread on other medias that are dangerous in terms of privacy, " "control, centralization and censorship. If you want to contact us and hope " "to get a response, please use the proper communication channels:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "the ones for ?public discussions," msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "the ones for private contacts." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We have received 40 reports sent using WhisperBack. Our receiving relay was " "regularly offline this month due to hardware issue." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The forum received 639 new messages, 73 of them signed by \"Tails\"." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Code\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "The following branches that had pending reviews were merged:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Using precompiled locales." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Incremental updates." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Support for live-boot 3.x." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "WhisperBack 1.6 (see details bellow)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Misc fixes and improvements that will show up in 0.13:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Fix the System Monitor applet by adding gnome-system-monitor." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Remove unused variables in htpdate." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Remove residual DHCP DNS settings from resolvconf." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Properly handle wireless per-country frequency regulation." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Hide the unusable 'TailsData' volume from Nautilus." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "ttdnsd is now out of the default name resolution loop. This should fix hard " "to track resolution errors." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "I2P has been updated to 0.9.1." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The ikiwiki forum is not anymore in the bundled static website. This results " "in an important build speed improvement." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A little more progress has been made on building Tails for the next upcoming " "Debian release (codename Wheezy). See " "[wheezy](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/wheezy) " "branch." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Started work on including Tor 0.2.3. This is targeted at 0.14. See " "[feature/Tor_0.2.3](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/Tor_0.2.3) " "branch." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "There is a [possible fix for the pause during the boot " "process](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-August/001524.html) " "that probably appeared with Tails 0.12." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Some more sorting has been made in order to retrofit our custom packages in " "?our future APT repositories and ?remove them from " "our Git repository." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "WhisperBack, our encrypted bug reporting application got a lot of " "improvements:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Load help from the config file instead of hardcoding it" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Sanitize debugging info" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "L10n: import translations for Arabic, Czech Spanish, Euskera, French, Dutch, " "Polish, Portuguese and Russian" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Improve UI especially for small screens" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Use a dedicated GnuPG keyring" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "On-going discussions\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Deactivate PCMCIA, ExpressCard and " "Firewire?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-August/001444.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[How to deal with roadmap and broken " "windows?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-August/001453.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Allow to access other systems in the local " "network?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-August/001487.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Disabling the 'PC " "speaker'?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-August/001504.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Call for review of plans for stream " "isolation](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-August/001532.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation and website\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Pages in the 'Documentation' section now link from one page to the next " "inside a same section, thanks to the new trail plugin for Ikiwiki." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Update the Windows documentation to use MD5 Reborned " "Hasher](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-August/001407.html) " "instead of the obsolete CheckIt." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Many improvements to the guide for translators." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Clarify some steps in the release process. " "Document better how to release Tails custom packages." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Update \"the." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Translations\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Some important work was done to translate more of our website to Portuguese, " "16% more of its strings got translated during this month." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We also received many patches for our custom programs in Russian, Arabic, " "and Farsi." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Funding\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We sent a proposal to sponsor *Bravo* about funding developers for October " "and November to work on our user support channels, documentation and " "hardware support." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Report

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Here is the report of what happened around Tails in July, 2012." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "People\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "One of us went to DebConf12 in Nicaragua." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The final steps towards a usable AppArmor in the next Debian release " "(codename: Wheezy) were completed. Also, Vidalia 0.2.20-1 was granted a " "freeze exception and will therefore be part of Wheezy." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "It was also an opportunity to meet some unexpected users of Tails within the " "Debian community." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "We have received 43 private bug reports sent using WhisperBack." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "656 messages were exchanged on the Tails web forum, with at least 104 " "answers signed as 'Tails'." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We had to work around a last minute change of plans for our annual developer " "summit happening in August." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Code\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "We did release Tails 0.12.1." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The whole ride to 0.12.1 was pretty painful. 0.12 contained nasty user " "visible issues. Some last minute changes in package repositories used by " "Tails had to be worked around. All this is convincing us that we need to be " "able to provide pre-release ISO images to be tested by supporting users. We " "also need automated tests and a more reliable system to deal with upstream " "and Tails packages." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The data collection mechanism for WhisperBack is more flexible. It will now " "send more logs from tails-greeter. Hopefully that would help to fix a bug " "like one we had in 0.12 quicker." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The default mailbox path of Claws Mail has been fixed to lie in the " "persistent directory." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Using precompiled locales is " "ready](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-July/001342.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Work has been done to stay compatible with recent changes in live-boot " "3.x. Work has been done to move to live-build 3.x." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Incremental updates are nearly " "done](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-July/001395.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A little more progress was made to port Tails to the next Debian release " "(codename Wheezy)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We have updated our (VM based) build system to use the latest version of " "Ikiwiki, as our 'mirrorlist' patch has finally been merged upstream." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "On-going discussions\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Feedback on a proof-of-concept for automated tests: see the " "[announcement](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-June/001285.html) " "and the ?automated builds and tests page." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[Using " "tlsdate?](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-July/001376.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "[htpdate and " "fingerprints](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-July/001394.html)" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation and website\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The new 'trail' ikiwiki plugin should help to have links from one page of " "the documentation to the other. [Preview " "available](https://mailman.boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2012-July/001393.html)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Some pages of the website has been locked for security, but their " "translations are still open." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Funding\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Karen from the Tor project worked with some of us to answer the call for " "proposals made by the European Instrument for Democracy & Human Rights " "(EIDHR). The call was directed toward projects that helps human rights " "defenders to defeat cyber-censorship. Our proposal mostly revolves around " "several improvements to Tails: automated builds and tests to be able to " "release more often, safer versions of Tails; better support for bridge and " "pluggable transports; better support for recent and upcoming computers; and " "translations improvements. We still don't have answers for first selection " "round, we will see how it goes." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Report:

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We are pleased to present you this Tails report. This report sums up the " "work that was done on Tails from January to April 2012." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "New releases\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Two new major versions of Tails were released." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The main changes featured by Tails 0.10, released on " "January 4th, are: remove potential information leakage by forcing explicit " "proxying through Tor; new GnuPG encryption applet to replace flawed FireGPG; " "new Iceweasel 9 version with HTML5 support; Iceweasel privacy improvements; " "new Tor version; better hardware support through new Linux kernel and X.Org " "versions, better internationalization." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "In Tails 0.11, released on April 26th, brought in: a " "new Tails Greeter login screen with easy access to new options; new Tails " "USB installer; optional configurable encrypted persistence; Traverso and " "GNOME keyring; better internationalization including BiDi support; better " "hardware support thanks to a new Linux kernel; new versions of Iceweasel and " "Vidalia." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We thoroughly documented the new features brought by Tails 0.11. We also " "upgraded of some outdated bits inherited from Incognito's documentation." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Internationalization\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We setup the [tails-l10n](https://mailman.boum.org/listinfo/tails-l10n/) " "mailing-list, that was of great use to coordinate documentation writers, " "developers and translators during the 0.11 release cycle. Translators are " "more than welcome!" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "GSoC\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "After seeing Max write a non-neglictible part of ?TailsGreeter last " "year, Tails is participating in the Google Summer of Code once again: Julien " "Voisin, who implemented the [Metadata Anonymizing " "Toolkit](https://mat.boum.org/) last year, will work on the ?Tails server " "project. We warmly welcome him into the Tails and Tor " "development communities, and we would like to thank everyone who made this " "happen!" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Miscellaneous\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "One of us has become a Debian Developer and, among other things, has been " "taking care some Perl modules are properly packaged so that we can migrate a " "few of our custom applications to GTK3 once Tails builds upon Wheezy." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "In January, we have replied to Jacob Appelbaum about the many suggestions he " "sent us. See the tails-dev mailing-list archives for details." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "And now?\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Future releases\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails 0.12 is likely to be ready for early summer. We are working on using " "the potential of Tails Greeter to let the user easily enable more options, " "such as Windows camouflage. Fully disabling JavaScript, Bridge mode and MAC " "address randomization are other candidates that might require some more time " "to get fully ready. Free WiFi hotspots support and local firewall hardening " "are not far from being releasable either." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "As a glimpse at our roadmap shows, we are getting close to the " "Tails 1.0 release, which might be out before the end of the year." msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Re-scaling our infrastructure\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Most of our current infrastructure has slowly grown from what was initially " "setup back in the early days of a project called amnesia. Since then, well, " "many things happened. It's almost a miracle that our infrastructure has " "scaled this well until now. But the limits of the old design are becoming " "apparent in various places. Most of the needs were thought through already, " "some of the future plans are crystal clear, what is now needed is to spend " "serious time on it, implement designed bits and design others for the next " "few years:" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "" "* ?Manage an APT repository for Tails: this\n" " blocks the Git split, the move to Icedove, and possibly\n" " ?distribute source.\n" "* ?Split the main Tails Git repository: our current\n" " Git repository is too big, and mixes stuff that hardly belongs\n" " together. Post-0.11 will be a great time to rewrite history, as we\n" " won't have that many unmerged development branches.\n" "* ?Improve the web forum: moving to a better\n" " web forum will get us a less cluttered Git history, better user\n" " experience, and hopefully even better community dynamics.\n" "* ?Automated builds and tests: this\n" " will become huge, but should start small.\n" "* ?Make WhisperBack SMTP relay more\n" " reliable: bring some more\n" " hardware up and running, refactor the Puppet recipes into\n" " a dedicated module.\n" "* document and clarify how our infrastructure works: some parts are\n" " very well documented, some are not at all. It should become easier\n" " to share infrastructure maintenance work.\n" "* miscellaneous other stuff:\n" " - ?Locking down the Tails website\n" " - ?Better web interface for website " "translation\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Connecting back to our immediate surroundings\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Many, among the software projects that are Tails upstream, are currently " "preparing new stable releases. Time is getting tight to make sure their " "upcoming releases fits Tails needs." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "" "* ?Get ready for live-build 3.x: Tails relies\n" " on Debian Live. Heavily. Tails 0.11 will ship live-boot and\n" " live-config 3.x, but we're still using live-build 2.x. We need to\n" " convert our configuration tree to the (deeply incompatible)\n" " live-build 3.x format. There is no turning back. All unmerged\n" " branches shall be converted, if possible at the same time. Just like\n" " the Git split, I think post-0.11 is a great time to do so... and,\n" " along the way, fix any bug in live-build 3.x we find.\n" "* Debian Wheezy: Tails relies on Debian. Heavily. Debian Wheezy is\n" " supposed to be frozen in June. We need to check what, in the current\n" " state of Debian Wheezy, is not fit for Tails, and fix it or have it\n" " fixed. Next step: to build Wheezy test images.\n" "* ?AppArmor: some of us have started\n" " to work on getting Debian Wheezy some AppArmor support. If the\n" " Wheezy freeze is not postponed, June is the deadline to get such\n" " things into Debian.\n" "* Tor 0.2.3.x: we need to make sure the next major Tor stable release\n" " will be great for Tails, with a focus on the separate streams\n" " features. Next steps: everyone of us, let's run Tor 0.2.3.x and use\n" " the separate streams feature. Put it into Tails experimental.\n" "* Vidalia 0.4 is supposed to be released as stable in the next few\n" " months. We need to make sure it will be great for Tails, with\n" " a focus on the areas it's lacking for us (bridges support) and where\n" " we patch it (see our patches). It would be great if we could ship\n" " Vidalia 0.4 without any custom patch, wouldn't it? Next steps:\n" " - run Vidalia 0.3.x from Debian experimental\n" " - test the branch that implements Tor#2905\n" " - look at our patches, and see what we could drop, have merged, or\n" " implement as a plugin\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Upcoming features\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We will implement ?partial upgrades in " "May. Upgrade packs will provide only what has changed between two releases " "(deltas) and a way to apply those changes to the currently running Tails " "(taking effect after reboot)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We have acknowledged a while ago Claws Mail usability shortcomings, " "especially when using slow connections; we ?settled on " "Icedove (also known as Thunderbird outside Debian) " "to replace it a while ago; we implemented a few necessary improvements " "(`git://labs.riseup.net/tails_icedove.git`); some more tweaks are needed " "though, and this is blocked by the lack of a proper Tails ?APT " "repository." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails will soon ship an ?\"unsafe\", non-torified " "browser, that will be useful to " "connect to networks that require registration, such as Wi-Fi hotspots." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Bimonthly

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We are pleased to present you the third Tails bimonthly report. This report " "sums up the work that was done on Tails in May and June 2011." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "New releases\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The new Tails 0.7.2 bugfix and security release was out on June 13th. See " "its announce for details." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "All main pages of Tails website have been vastly improved. Content is now " "better structured and easier to read; it also looks a lot nicer." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Many efforts have been put in the ?download page that now provides a much " "improved step by step explanation of how to get, verify, install and use " "Tails. Screenshots, Windows and Mac OS X instructions are included for even " "more awesomeness, along with dozens of other tiny little layout and design " "improvements." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The *walkthrough* that was initially imported from Incognito is still " "outdated, but sections that need to be reworked have been clearly labeled as " "such." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "More work on the documentation is happening in the [public `doc-rework` Git " "branch](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/doc-rework). " "Tails developers are not that skilled in documentation writing, so help is " "needed and much welcome!" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Our public email address was renamed to ; its OpenPGP " "key was updated accordingly. We also have " "?documented how to get to trust our " "OpenPGP keys." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "GSoC\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "As announced in the previous report, the Tails " "project is participating in the Google Summer of Code. One student committed " "to work on the ?tails-greeter, which will enable us to " "implement many features that depend on a better boot menu. His progress can " "be followed on the ?project's development " "blog. The code can be seen in the [tails-greeter " "Git repository](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=max/tails-greeter.git;a=summary) " "and in a [feature branch in the main Tails Git " "repository](http://git.immerda.ch/?p=amnesia.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/feature/tails-greeter)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "With this new boot menu in mind, a solution was implemented to offer a " "?safer handling of administrative privileges within " "Tails. It will be enabled as soon as " "tails-greeter is ready for prime-time." msgstr "" #. type: Title = #, no-wrap msgid "And now?\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Upcoming release\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Unless bad security issues are detected, the next Tails version will be a " "major one, dubbed as 0.8. It should contain a few new features:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "To make Tails users harder to single out from other Tor users, Pidgin " "nickname generation process was improved." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "An easily reachable immediate shutdown button was added to the top panel; " "moreover, the computer is now shutdown when any power-related button is " "pressed (power, sleep, lid close)." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Accessibility: install a screen magnifier and a screen reader." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "The current on-screen keyboard shipped in Tails (namely: onBoard) never " "made it into Debian. We have been carrying the burden of forward-porting our " "patches for more than one year. Florence, a new, nicer and more featureful " "on-screen keyboard entered Debian a few weeks ago and ?should be " "shipped in Tails by the next release." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "The PiTIVi video editor is now installed in Tails." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "It should also include several minor fixes and improvements:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "The handling of hardware clocks that are skewed enough to prevent initial " "connection to Tor was fixed." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "The firewall was tightened a bit more." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "Tails build system now uses more elegant and robust ways to disable swapoff " "and hide items from the GNOME menu." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "Frequent disconnections while using Gobby were fixed by adding its port to " "Tor's LongLivedPorts list." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "VirtualBox 4.x guest packages are now installed. We have prepared the " "backports that were pushed to the Debian Backports archive." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "" "The [arm](http://www.atagar.com/arm/) terminal status monitor for Tor is now " "installed." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "This new major release will introduce several changes that might be tricky " "to get totally right at first. Enthusiasts, your help will be very welcome " "to test preview images once they are published. Stay tuned!" msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Installing and upgrading Tails onto a USB stick\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "As announced in the previous report, a few of us " "have started working on a tool for ?easy install and upgrade of Tails onto " "USB sticks, with support for an encrypted " "persistent volume in mind." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Research has also been made on how to reduce download size (and times) of " "minor releases. A solution to this problem was thought through and its " "working was confirmed by preliminary testing." msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Upcoming features\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "As an alternative to ?supporting Flash, we are " "considering ?shipping a HTML5-compliant web " "browser. We have been investigating shipping " "?Iceweasel 5.x and conducted some initial tests. Doing so would " "additionally allow us to ?stop using polipo in iceweasel... and the " "?problems it causes." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We have acknowledged Claws Mail usability shortcomings, especially when " "using slow connections. After ?some more " "research, it looks like Icedove (Debian's " "rebranded version of Mozilla Thunderbird) could be a proper candidate to " "replace Claws Mail; a few tweaks and verifications are needed before this " "happens, though." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Compressing the Tails SquashFS using ?XZ (formerly known as LZMA) " "compression will lower the generated images' " "size by about 100MB! XZ has been supported in the mainlaine Linux kernel " "since 2.6.38, and has since made its way into kernels shipped by " "Debian. Hence, Tails is likely to use this feature soon." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Patches to mute the system's sound levels at boot time were " "[contributed](https://boum.org/pipermail/tails-dev/2011-June/000354.html). " "However, they need more polishing before we can merge them." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The lack of support of arbitrary DNS queries being annoying for some Tails " "(power-)users, we have ?made some " "progress towards a resolution of this " "issue; the implementation of a proper solution was blocked by bug #" "3369 on Tor Project's Trac; therefore, we contributed a tiny patch to fix it. This issue will " "be solved once Tor 0.2.2.x is stabilized and shipped in Tails." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We have also worked towards Tails-compatible support of bridges in Tor and " "Vidalia." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "With respect to ?VoIP support, we have refreshed our VoIP software " "round-up and got in touch with some of their developers to get a better idea " "of which one we will include in Tails." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "To end with, the Tails core developers have recently discussed nearly every " "pending task whose implementation was blocked by the lack of a clear " "decision. As a consequence, our roadmap was updated. This makes " "it possible for us, and any other contributor, to move " "forward on many topics." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Bimonthly

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "We are pleased to present you the second Tails bimonthly report." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "This report may, or may not, be followed by others depending on the feedback " "we get: if you like reading such news about Tails, don't hesitate telling " "us!" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "This report sums up the work that was done on Tails in March and April 2011." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "New releases" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The new Tails 0.7 major release was out on April 7th, quickly followed by a " "bugfix and security release (0.7.1) on April 30th. See their release " "announces for details:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Tails 0.7 announce" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: ' * ' msgid "Tails 0.7.1 announce" msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "Google Summer of Code" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We announced two months ago we [prepared three " "projects](https://www.torproject.org/getinvolved/volunteer.html#project-tails) " "to be submitted under the Tor Project umbrella for the Google Summer of " "Code. This was a great success for our first participation into the GSoC " "program, as a total of five students sent applications for our projects. In " "the end, two students were selected and will work this summer on projects we " "have suggested:" msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: '* ' msgid "" "Max will implement ?tails-greeter, the graphical " "?boot menu Tails really needs as more and more upcoming features " "(including ?persistence, ?macchanger, [[todo/bridge " "support]]) need to ask the user for input at boot time; reports of his work " "will be posted on a dedicated ?blog." msgstr "" #. type: Bullet: '* ' msgid "" "Julien Voisin will implement a Meta-data anonymizing toolkit for file " "publication; thanks a lot to Mike Perry for accepting to be Julien's mentor, " "as we ourselves lack the needed time to mentor two students this year; " "Julien has setup a [blog](http://mat-tor.blogspot.com/) where one can keep " "track of his work." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We warmly welcome Max and Julien into the Tails and Tor development " "communities!" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Thanks to everyone who made this happen, including the students whose GSoC " "application was rejected: you are welcome to join us anyway!" msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "Documentation" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The Great Tails Documentation Rework Plan was started. Once this is done, " "several entry points will be available to better fit a given user's " "available time and energy. Such work happens in the `doc-rework` branch of " "our Git repository. Want to " "help?" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A brand new \"how to contribute to Tails\" documentation was " "published. We hope it will make it easier for anyone interested to get " "involved and make Tails better as there many ways *you* can contribute to " "Tails: setting up a BitTorrent or HTTP mirror, helping other Tails users, " "improving documentation, reporting bugs, fixing bugs, implementing new " "features, improving Tails in your own language, providing needed input to " "developers, etc." msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "Outreach" msgstr "" #. type: Title ## #, no-wrap msgid "In the press" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Shortly following their [announcement of Tails 0.7 " "release](https://lwn.net/Articles/439371/), LWN published a [great, long and " "serious article about Tails](https://lwn.net/Articles/440279/) in last " "week's edition." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Tails 0.7 release also [made " "it](http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20110418#news) " "[twice](http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=06629) on DistroWatch." msgstr "" #. type: Title ## #, no-wrap msgid "Website" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We published our new website layout. If you're into CSS, patches are welcome " "to fix the latest glitches." msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "A glimpse towards the future" msgstr "" #. type: Title ## #, no-wrap msgid "Upcoming releases" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We've not decided yet what our plans exactly are. The alternative seems to " "be: either we'll release 0.8 quickly with stuff that was mostly ready, but " "not tested enough to make it into 0.7, or we'll release 0.8 only when " "slightly more new major features are cooked and ready to serve." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "More 0.7.x point releases are to be expected anyway as security issues are " "discovered in software we ship." msgstr "" #. type: Title ## #, no-wrap msgid "Installing and upgrading Tails onto a USB stick" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "In the next months, a few of us are going to focus on preparing a tool for " "easy install and upgrade of Tails onto USB sticks, with support for an " "encrypted persistent volume in mind. We're likely to use Fedora's " "[liveusb-creator](https://fedorahosted.org/liveusb-creator/) as a " "basis. Either we'll make it more generic or we'll fork it minimally, " "depending on how liveusb-creator's developers welcome the idea of supporting " "our usecases." msgstr "" #. type: Title ## #, no-wrap msgid "Other plans" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Bridges support: we now have a working prototype that is likely to be " "shipped into the upcoming 0.8 release. We'll make our patches to make " "Vidalia support our usecase generic enough so that they can be merged " "upstream." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "PowerPC support (pre-Intel Macs): we're \"almost\" there, but we have a hard " "time prioritizing this task among all exciting enhancements that could be " "done on Tails. If you need Tails to support pre-Intel Macs, don't hesitate " "telling us." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM

\"Bimonthly

# SOME DESCRIPTIVE TITLE # Copyright (C) YEAR Free Software Foundation, Inc. # This file is distributed under the same license as the PACKAGE package. # FIRST AUTHOR , YEAR. # #, fuzzy msgid "" msgstr "" "Project-Id-Version: PACKAGE VERSION\n" "POT-Creation-Date: 2015-11-19 23:06+0100\n" "PO-Revision-Date: YEAR-MO-DA HO:MI+ZONE\n" "Last-Translator: FULL NAME \n" "Language-Team: LANGUAGE \n" "Language: \n" "MIME-Version: 1.0\n" "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8\n" "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit\n" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "We are pleased to present you the first Tails bimonthly report ever." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "This is a first try that may, or may not, be followed by others depending on " "the feedback we get: if you like reading such news about Tails, don't " "hesitate telling us!" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "This report sums up the work that was done on Tails in January and February " "2011." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text #, no-wrap msgid "\n" msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "Helping third-parties do security analyses of Tails" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We finished writing and published the Tails design " "document that presents a specification of a *Privacy " "Enhancing Live Distribution* (PELD) as well as the Tails actual " "implementation." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "By writing this document we intend to help third-parties do security " "analyses of any given PELD and specifically of Tails. We also wish to help " "establish best practices in the field of PELD design and implementation, and " "thus raise the baseline for all similar projects out there." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Reviews of this document and audits of Tails are most welcome." msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "Preparing next release" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The next Tails release, which will be called 0.7, is based on the newly " "released Debian Squeeze. It has been feature freezed recently and is now " "being tested in a wild, unsuspecting world; if it survives, we can bet it " "will be the best Tails release ever... until 0.8 is out of course." msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Protecting against memory recovery\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A new, safer way to wipe memory on shutdown was implemented. It is now also " "used when the boot media is physically removed: in an emergency situation, " "one can grab her Tails Live USB stick or Live CD and leave while the system " "will quickly erase her traces from the computer's memory and shut it down." msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Making Tails easier to use\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We enhanced the onBoard virtual keyboard; patches were obviously submitted " "upstream." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The Tails user interface was improved in several other ways: hiding some " "useless GNOME preference menu items, using a background that does not " "overlap with the bootloader menu, adding a shutdown button to the right of " "the top GNOME panel (nice idea stolen from Ubuntu)." msgstr "" #. type: Title - #, no-wrap msgid "Other noteworthy enhancements\n" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A fix for a virtual keyboard critical bug was prepared, amongst the ton of " "usual release preparation work." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "TrueCrypt can be optionally installed at boot time; we may not want to " "include TrueCrypt forever, but we at the very least we want to provide a " "migration path from TrueCrypt volumes created by good old Incognito to other " "formats." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The [HTTPS Everywhere](https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere) Iceweasel " "extension is now installed." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Queries to DNS resolvers on the LAN are ?now " "forbidden." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Writing our design document made us think more " "thoroughly various parts of the Tails configuration and enhance many parts " "of it. Moreover, we compared it with the [Tor Browser " "Bundle](https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en) " "configuration, picked many nice ideas from there, and generally made Tails " "configuration more similar to the TBB's one, which shall ease peer review " "and enlarge the anonymity set Tails users are part of. A notable example is " "the enabling of US English browser spoofing in Iceweasel." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "The HTP time synchronization system is now more robust wrt. network " "failures." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "GNOME automatic media mounting and opening was disabled to protect against a " "class of attacks that was recently put under the spotlights." msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "Outreach" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "Tails was added to a couple spots on the Tor website:" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "- https://www.torproject.org/projects/projects.html.en - " "https://www.torproject.org/getinvolved/volunteer.html.en#Projects" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We discussed various funding and sponsoring opportunities; we have [prepared " "three " "projects](https://www.torproject.org/getinvolved/volunteer.html#project-tails) " "that shall be submitted under the Tor Project umbrella for the Google Summer " "of Code and other summer intership programs. [One of " "those](https://www.torproject.org/getinvolved/volunteer.html#tailsDebianLive)." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We have participated in the Debian Derivatives Census initiative (" "Derivatives/Census): Tails now has a dedicated page (" "Derivatives/Census/TAILS) on the Debian Wiki; in order to better cooperate " "with Debian, we have followed their guidelines for Debian Derivatives " "(Derivatives/Guidelines); e.g. we have published a statement " "about our relationship with upstream." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Website design: a few visible enhancements have been pushed online, but stay " "tuned, some more is being worked on under the hood! Rumor says our CSS " "gnomes are preparing something pretty slick." msgstr "" #. type: Title # #, no-wrap msgid "A glimpse towards the future" msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Bridges support: we now have a working prototype; it might not make its way " "into the upcoming 0.7 release though." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "Accessibility tools for visually impaired people have been selected and are " "installed in our development Git branch." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We updated our survey of existing tools for easy install and upgrade of " "Tails onto USB sticks, with support for an encrypted persistent volume in " "mind." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "More and more upcoming Tails features (including ?persistence, " "?macchanger, ?bridge support) need ways to ask the user for " "input at boot time. We have ?researched various ways we " "could implement this." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "We have researched how we could harden a bit Tails resistance against " "exploitation of security issues in bundled software " "(?Mandatory Access Control, ?nx bit, kernel hardening, " "compiler hardening options) in a way that would not be a maintenance " "burden... while being efficient enough to protect against some classes of " "attacks. We have started efforts to push such hardening features in Debian." msgstr "" #. type: Plain text msgid "" "A general plan was thought through to reorganize the Tails user " "documentation. Once this is done, several entry points will be available to " "better fit a given user's available time and energy. In the meantime, we now " "at least have a ?nice " "documentation that explains " "how to install Tails onto a USB stick." msgstr ""

20 May, 2016 08:24PM