September 02, 2014

hackergotchi for Raphaël Hertzog

Raphaël Hertzog

My Free Software Activities in August 2014

This is my monthly summary of my free software related activities. If you’re among the people who made a donation to support my work (65.55 €, thanks everybody!), then you can learn how I spent your money. Otherwise it’s just an interesting status update on my various projects.

Distro Tracker

Even though I was officially in vacation during 3 of the 4 weeks of August, I spent many nights working on Distro Tracker. I’m pleased to have managed to bring back Python 3 compatibility over all the (tested) code base. The full test suite now passes with Python 3.4 and Django 1.6 (or 1.7).

From now on, I’ll run “tox” on all code submitted to make sure that we won’t regress on this point. tox also runs flake8 for me so that I can easily detect when the submitted code doesn’t respect the PEP8 coding style. It also catches other interesting mistakes (like unused variable or too complex functions).

Getting the code to pass flake8 was also a major effort, it resulted in a huge commit (89 files changed, 1763 insertions, 1176 deletions).

Thanks to the extensive test suite, all those refactoring only resulted in two regressions that I fixed rather quickly.

Some statistics: 51 commits over the last month, 41 by me, 3 by Andrew Starr-Bochicchio, 3 by Christophe Siraut, 3 by Joseph Herlant and 1 by Simon Kainz. Thanks to all of them! Their contributions ported some features that were already available on the old PTS. The new PTS is now warning of upcoming auto-removals, is displaying problems with uptream URLs, includes a short package description in the page title, and provides a link to screenshots (if they exist on screenshots.debian.net).

We still have plenty of bugs to handle, so you can help too: check out https://tracker.debian.org/docs/contributing.html. I always leave easy bugs for others to handle, so grab one and get started! I’ll review your patch with pleasure. :-)

Tryton

After my last batch of contributions to Tryton’s French Chart of Accounts (#4108, #4109, #4110, #4111) Cédric Krier granted me commit rights to the account_fr mercurial module.

Debconf 14

I wasn’t able to attend this year but thanks to awesome work of the video team, I watched some videos (and I still have a bunch that I want to see). Some of them were put online the day after they had been recorded. Really amazing work!

Django 1.7

After the initial bug reports, I got some feedback of maintainers who feared that it would be difficult to get their packages working with Django 1.7. I helped them as best as I can by providing some patches (for horizon, for django-restricted-resource, for django-testscenarios).

Since I expected many maintainers to be not very pro-active, I rebuilt all packages with Django 1.7 to detect at least those that would fail to build. I tagged as confirmed all the corresponding bug reports.

Looking at https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/pkgreport.cgi?users=python-django@packages.debian.org;tag=django17, one can see that some progress has been made with 25 packages fixed. Still there are at least 25 others that are still problematic in sid and 35 that have not been investigated at all (except for the automatic rebuild that passed). Again your help is more than welcome!

It’s easy to install python-django 1.7 from experimental and they try to use/rebuild the packages from the above list.

Dpkg translation

With the freeze approaching, I wanted to ensure that dpkg was fully translated in French. I thus pinged debian-l10n-french@lists.debian.org and merged some translations that were done by volunteers. Unfortunately it looks like nobody really stepped up to maintain it in the long run… so I did myself the required update when dpkg 1.17.12 got uploaded.

Is there anyone willing to manage dpkg’s French translation? With the latest changes in 1.17.13, we have again a few untranslated strings:
$ for i in $(find . -name fr.po); do echo $i; msgfmt -c -o /dev/null --statistics $i; done
./po/fr.po
1083 translated messages, 4 fuzzy translations, 1 untranslated message.
./dselect/po/fr.po
268 translated messages, 3 fuzzy translations.
./scripts/po/fr.po
545 translated messages.
./man/po/fr.po
2277 translated messages, 8 fuzzy translations, 3 untranslated messages.

Misc stuff

I made an xsane QA upload (it’s currently orphaned) to drop the (build-)dependency on liblcms1 and avoid getting it removed from Debian testing (see #745524). For the record, how-can-i-help warned me of this after one dist-upgrade.

With the Django 1.7 work and the need to open up an experimental branch, I decided to switch python-django’s packaging to git even though the current team policy is to use subversion. This triggered (once more) the discussion about a possible switch to git and I was pleased to see more enthusiasm this time around. Barry Warsaw tested a few workflows, shared his feeling and pushed toward a live discussion of the switch during Debconf. It looks like it might happen for good this time. I contributed my share in the discussions on the mailing list.

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

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02 September, 2014 03:58PM by Raphaël Hertzog

Daniel Baumann

Public Perception

I noticed at DebConf 14 that people still think I would maintain many packages in Debian. This is not true for several years.

Here is to clarify once and for all – I maintain 17 packages:

Not more, not less, and I also do not intend to upload any new packages to Debian.


02 September, 2014 10:11AM by danielbaumannch

Antonio Terceiro

DebConf 14: Community, Debian CI, Ruby, Redmine, and Noosfero

This time, for personal reasons I wasn’t able to attend the full DebConf, which started on the Saturday August 22nd. I arrived at Portland on the Tuesday the 26th by noon, at the 4th of the conference. Even though I would like to arrive earlier, the loss was alleviated by the work of the amazing DebConf video team. I was able to follow remotely most of the sessions I would like to attend if I were there already.

As I will say to everyone, DebConf is for sure the best conference I have ever attended. The technical and philosophical discussions that take place in talks, BoF sessions or even unplanned ad-hoc gathering are deep. The hacking moments where you have a chance to pair with fellow developers, with whom you usually only have contact remotely via IRC or email, are precious.

That is all great. But definitively, catching up with old friends, and making new ones, is what makes DebConf so special. Your old friends are your old friends, and meeting them again after so much time is always a pleasure. New friendships will already start with a powerful bond, which is being part of the Debian community.

Being only 4 hours behind my home time zone, jetlag wasn’t a big problem during the day. However, I was waking up too early in the morning and consequently getting tired very early at night, so I mostly didn’t go out after hacklabs were closed at 10PM.

Despite all of the discussion, being in the audience for several talks, other social interactions and whatnot, during this DebConf I have managed to do quite some useful work.

debci and the Debian Continuous Integration project

I gave a talk where I discussed past, present, and future of debci and the Debian Continuous Integration project. The slides are available, as well as the video recording. One thing I want you to take away is that there is a difference between debci and the Debian Continuous Integration project:

  • debci is a platform for Continuous Integration specifically tailored for the Debian repository and similar ones. If you work on a Debian derivative, or otherwise provides Debian packages in a repository, you can use debci to run tests for your stuff.
    • a (very) few thinks in debci, though, are currently hardcoded for Debian. Other projects using it would be a nice and needed peer pressure to get rid of those.
  • Debian Continuous Integration is Debian’s instance of debci, which currently runs tests for all packages in the unstable distribution that provide autopkgtest support. It will be expanded in the future to run tests on other suites and architectures.

A few days before DebConf, Cédric Boutillier managed to extract gem2deb-test-runner from gem2deb, so that autopkgtest tests can be run against any Ruby package that has tests by running gem2deb-test-runner --autopkgtest. gem2deb-test-runner will do the right thing, make sure that the tests don’t use code from the source package, but instead run them against the installed package.

Then, right after my talk I was glad to discover that the Perl team is also working on a similar tool that will automate running tests for their packages against the installed package. We agreed that they will send me a whitelist of packages in which we could just call that tool and have it do The Right Thing.

We might be talking here about getting autopkgtest support (and consequentially continuous integration) for free for almost 2000 packages. The missing bits for this to happen are:

  • making debci use a whitelist of packages that, while not having the appropriate Testsuite: autopkgtest field in the Sources file, could be assumed to have autopkgtest support by calling the right tool (gem2deb-test-runner for Ruby, or the Perl team’s new tool for Perl packages).
  • make the autopkgtest test runner assume a corresponding, implicit, debian/tests/control when it not exists in those packages

During a few days I have mentored Lucas Kanashiro, who also attended DebConf, on writing a patch to add support for email notifications in debci so maintainers can be pro-actively notified of status changes (pass/fail, fail/pass) in their packages.

I have also started hacking on the support for distributed workers, based on the initial work by Martin Pitt:

  • updated the amqp branch against the code in the master branch.
  • added a debci enqueue command that can be used to force test runs for packages given on the command line.
  • I sent a patch for librabbitmq that adds support for limiting the number of messages the server will send to a connected client. With this patch applied, the debci workers were modified to request being sent only 1 message at a time, so late workers will start to receive packages to process as soon as they are up. Without this, a single connected worker would receive all messages right away, while a second worker that comes up 1 second later would sit idle until new packages are queued for testing.

Ruby

I had some discusion with Christian about making Rubygems install to $HOME by default when the user is not root. We discussed a few implementation options, and while I don’t have a solution yet, we have a better understanding of the potential pitfalls.

The Ruby BoF session on Friday produced a few interesting discussions. Some take away point include, but are not limited to:

  • Since the last DebConf, we were able to remove all obsolete Ruby interpreters, and now only have Ruby 2.1 in unstable. Ruby 2.1 will be the default version in Debian 8 (jessie).
  • There is user interest is being able to run the interpreter from Debian, but install everything else from Rubygems.
  • We are lacking in all the documentation-related goals for jessie that were proposed at the previous DebConf.

Redmine

I was able to make Redmine work with the Rails 4 stack we currently have in unstable/testing. This required using a snapshot of the still unreleased version 3.0 based on the rails-4.1 branch in the upstream Subversion repository as source.

I am a little nervous about using a upstream snapshot, though. According to the "roadmap of the project ":http://www.redmine.org/projects/redmine/roadmap the only purpose of the 3.0 release will be to upgrade to Rails 4, but before that happens there should be a 2.6.0 release that is also not released yet. 3.0 should be equivalent to that 2.6.0 version both feature-wise and, specially, bug-wise. The only problem is that we don’t know what that 2.6.0 looks like yet. According to the roadmap it seems there is not much left in term of features for 2.6.0, though.

The updated package is not in unstable yet, but will be soon. It needs more testing, and a good update to the documentation. Those interested in helping to test Redmine on jessie before the freeze please get in touch with me.

Noosfero

I gave a lighting talk on Noosfero, a platform for social networking websites I am upstream for. It is a Rails appplication licensed under the AGPLv3, and there are packages for wheezy. You can checkout the slides I used. Video recording is not available yet, but should be soon.

That’s it. I am looking forward to DebConf 15 at Heidelberg. :-)

02 September, 2014 01:46AM

September 01, 2014

hackergotchi for Lars Wirzenius

Lars Wirzenius

45

45 today. I should stop being childish, but I don't wanna.

01 September, 2014 09:10PM

hackergotchi for Dirk Eddelbuettel

Dirk Eddelbuettel

littler 0.2.0

We are happy to announce a new release of littler.

A few minor things have changes since the last release: max-heap image
  • A few new examples were added or updated, including use of the fabulous new docopt package by Edwin de Jonge which makes command-line parsing a breeze.
  • Other new examples show simple calls to help with sweave, knitr, roxygen2, Rcpp's attribute compilation, and more.
  • We also wrote an entirely new webpage with usage example.
  • A new option -d | --datastdin was added which will read stdin into a data.frame variable X.
  • The repository has been move to this GitHub repo.
  • With that, the build process was updated both throughout but also to reflect the current git commit at time of build.

Full details are provided at the ChangeLog

The code is available via the GitHub repo, from tarballs off my littler page and the local directory here. A fresh package will got to Debian's incoming queue shortly as well.

Comments and suggestions are welcome via the mailing list or issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

01 September, 2014 06:13PM

Joseph Bisch

Debconf Wrapup

Debconf14 was the first Debconf I attended. It was an awesome experience.

Debconf14 started with a Meet and Greet before the Welcome Talk. I got to meet people and find out what they do for Debian. I also got to meet other GSoC students that I had only previously interacted with online. During the Meet and Greet I also met one of my mentors for GSoC, Zack. Later in the conference I met another of my mentors, Piotr. Previously I only interacted with Zack and Piotr online.

On Monday we had the OpenPGP Keysigning. I got to meet people and exchange information so that we could later sign keys. Then on Tuesday I gave my talk about debmetrics as part of the larger GSoC talks.

During the conference I mostly attended talks. Then on Wednesday we had the daytrip. I went hiking at Multnomah Falls, had lunch at Rooster Rock State Park, and then went to Vista House.

Later in the conference, Zack and I did some work on debmetrics. We looked at the tests, which had some issues. I was able to fix most of the issues with the tests while I was there at Debconf. We also moved the debmetrics repository under the qa category of repositories. Previously it was a private repository.

01 September, 2014 06:02PM

hackergotchi for Jo Shields

Jo Shields

Xamarin Apt and Yum repos now open for testing

Howdy y’all

Two of the main things I’ve been working on since I started at Xamarin are making it easier for people to try out the latest bleeding-edge Mono, and making it easier for people on older distributions to upgrade Mono without upgrading their entire OS.

Public Jenkins packages

Every time anyone commits to Mono git master or MonoDevelop git master, our public Jenkins will try and turn those into packages, and add them to repositories. There’s a garbage collection policy – currently the 20 most recent builds are always kept, then the first build of the month for everything older than 20 builds.

Because we’re talking potentially broken packages here, I wrote a simple environment mangling script called mono-snapshot. When you install a Jenkins package, mono-snapshot will also be installed and configured. This allows you to have multiple Mono versions installed at once, for easy bug bisecting.

directhex@marceline:~$ mono --version
Mono JIT compiler version 3.6.0 (tarball Wed Aug 20 13:05:36 UTC 2014)
directhex@marceline:~$ . mono-snapshot mono
[mono-20140828234844]directhex@marceline:~$ mono --version
Mono JIT compiler version 3.8.1 (tarball Fri Aug 29 07:11:20 UTC 2014)

The instructions for setting up the Jenkins packages are on the new Mono web site, specifically here. The packages are built on CentOS 7 x64, Debian 7 x64, and Debian 7 i386 – they should work on most newer distributions or derivatives.

Stable release packages

This has taken a bit longer to get working. The aim is to offer packages in our Apt/Yum repositories for every Mono release, in a timely fashion, more or less around the same time as the Mac installers are released. Info for setting this up is, again, on the new website.

Like the Jenkins packages, they are designed as far as I am able to cleanly integrate with different versions of major popular distributions – though there are a few instances of ABI breakage in there which I have opted to fix using one evil method rather than another evil method.

Please note that these are still at “preview” or “beta” quality, and shouldn’t be considered usable in major production environments until I get a bit more user feedback. The RPM packages especially are super new, and I haven’t tested them exhaustively at this point – I’d welcome feedback.

I hope to remove the “testing!!!” warning labels from these packages soon, but that relies on user feedback to my xamarin.com account preferably (jo.shields@)

01 September, 2014 04:46PM by directhex

Juliana Louback

Debconf 2014 and How I Became a Debian Contributor

Part 1 - Debconf 2014

This year I went to my first Debconf, which took place in Portland, OR during the last week of August 2014. All in all I have to rate my experience as very enlightening and in the end quite fun.

First of all, it was a little daunting to go to a conference in 1 - A city I’d never been to before; 2 - A conference with 300+ people, only 3 of which I knew and even then I only knew them virtually. Not to mention I was in the presence of some extremely brilliant and known contirbutors in the Debian community which was somewhat intimidating. Just to give you an idea, Linus Torvalds showed up for a Q&A session last Friday morning! Jealous? Actually I missed that too. It was kind of a last minute thing, booked for coincidentally the exact time I’d be flying out of Portland. I found out about it much too late. But luckily for me and maybe you, the session was filmed and can be seen here. Isn’t that a treat?

Point made, there are lots of really talented people there, both techies and non-techies. It’s easy to feel you’re out of league, at least I did. But I’d highly encourage you to ignore such feelings if you’re ever in the same situation. Debian has been built on for a long time now, but although a lot has been done, a lot still needs to be done. The Debian community is very welcoming of new contributors and users, regardless of the level of expertise. So far I haven’t been snubbed by anyone. To the contrary, all my interactions with the Debian community members has been extremely positive.

So go ahead and attend the meetings and presentations, even if you think it’s not your area of expertise. Debconf was organized (or at least this one was) as a series of talks, meet ups and ad hoc sessions, some of which occured simultaneously. The sessions were all about different components of the Debian universe, from presenting new features to overviews of accomplishments to discussing issues and how to fix them. A schedule with the location and description of each session was posted on the Debconf wiki. Sometimes none of the sessions at a certain time was on a topic I knew very much about. But I’d sit in anyways. There’s no rule to attending the sessions, no ‘minimum qualifications’ required. You’ll likely learn something new and you just might find out there is something you can do to contribute. There are also hackathons that are quite the thing or so I heard. Or you could walk about and meet new people, do some networking.

I have to say networking was the highlight of the Debconf for me. Remember I said I knew about 3 people who were at the conference? Well, I had actually just corresponded with those people. I didn’t really know them. So on my first day I spent quite some time shyly peeking at people’s name tags, trying to recognize someone I had ‘met’ over email or IRC. But with 300 or so people at the conference, I was unsuccessful. So I finally gave up on that strategy and walked up to a random person, stuck out my hand and said, “Hi. My name is Juliana. This is my first Debconf. What’s your name and what do you do for Debian?” This may not be according to protocol, but it worked for me. I got to meet lots of people that way, met some Debian contributos from my home country (Brazil), some from my current city (NYC), and yet others that had similar interests as I do who I might work with in the near future. For example, I love Machine Learning, I’m currently beginning my graduate studies on that track. Several Debian contributors offered to introduce me to a well known Machine Learning researcher and Debian contributor who is in NYC. Others had tried out JSCommunicator and had lots of suggestions for new features and fixes, or wanted to know more about the project and WebRTC in general. Also, not everyone there is a super experienced Debian contributor or user. There are a lot of newbies like me.

I got to do a quick 20-min presentation and demo of the work I had done on JSCommunicator during GSoC 2014. Oh my goodness that was nerve-wracking, but not half as painful as I expected. My mentor (Daniel Pocock) wisely suggested that when confronted with a question I didn’t know how to answer, to redirect the question to to the audience. Chances are, there is someone there that knows the answer. If not, it will at least spark a good discussion.

When meeting new people at Debian, a question almost everyone asked is “How did you start working with/for Debian?”. So I thought it would be a good topic to post about.

Part 2 - How I Became a Debian Contributor

Sometime in late October of 2013 (I think) I received an email from one of my professors at UNIRIO forwarding a description of the Outreach Program for Women. OPW is a program organized by the GNOME which endeavors to get more women involved in FOSS. OPW is similar to Google Summer of Code; you work remotely from home, guided by an assigned mentor. Debian was one of the 8 participating organizations that year. There was a list of project proposals which I perused, a few of them caught my eye and these projects were all Debian. I’d already been a fan of FOSS before. I had used the Ubuntu and Debian OS, I’d migrated to GIMP from Photoshop and to Open Office from Microsoft Office, for example. I’d strongly advocated the use of some of my prefered open source apps and programs to my friends and family. But I hadn’t ever contributed to a FOSS project.

There’s no time like the present, so I reached out the the mentor responsible for one of the projects I was interested in, Daniel Pocock. Daniel guided me through making a small contribution to a FOSS project, which serves as a token demonstration of my abilities and is part of the application process. I added a small feature to JMXetric and suggested a fix for an issue in the xTuple project. Actually, I had forgotten about this. Recently I made another contribution to xTuple, it’s funny to see things come full circle. I also had to write a profile-ish description of my experience and how I intended on contributing during OPW on the Debian wiki, if you’d like you can check it out here.

I wouldn’t follow my example to a T, because in the end I didn’t make the OPW selection. Actually, I take that back. The fact I wasn’t chosen for OPW that year doesn’t mean I was incompetent or incapable of making a valuable contribution. OPW and GSoC do not have unlimited resources; they can’t include everyone they’d like to. They receive thousands of proposals from very talented engineers and not everyone can participate at a given moment. But even though I wasn’t selected, like I said, I could still pitch in. It’s good to keep in mind that people usually aren’t paid to contribute to FOSS. It’s usually volunteer based, which I think is one of the beauties of the FOSS community and in my opinion one of the causes of it’s success and great quality. People contribute because they want to, not because they have to.

I will say I was a little disappointed at not being chosen. But after being reassured that this ‘rejection’ wasn’t due to any lack on my part, I decided to continue contributing to the Debian project I’d applied to. I was begining the final semester of my undergraduate studies which included writing a thesis. To be able to focus on my thesis and graduate on time, I’d stopped working temporarily and was studying full time. But I didn’t want to lose practice and contributing to a FOSS project is a great way to stay in coding shape while doing something useful. So continue contributing I did.

It paid off. I gained experience, added value to a FOSS project and I think my previous contributions added weight to the application I later made for GSoC 2014. I passed this time. To be honest, I really wasn’t counting on it. Actually, I was certain I wouldn’t pass for some reason - insecure much? But with GSoC I wasn’t too anxious about it as I was with the OPW application because by then, I was already ‘hooked’. I’d learned about all the benefits of becoming a FOSS contributor and I wasn’t stopping anytime soon. I had every intention of still working on my FOSS project with or without GSoC. GSoC 2014 ended a week ago (August 18th 2014). There’s a list of things I still want to do with JSCommunicator and you can be sure I’ll keep working on them.

P.S. This is not to say that programs like OPW and GSoC aren’t amazing programs. Try it out if you can, it’s really a great experience.

01 September, 2014 10:06AM

hackergotchi for Christian Perrier

Christian Perrier

Bug #760000

René Mayorga reported Debian bug #760000 on Saturday August 30th, against the pyfribidi package.

Bug #750000 was reported as of May 31th: nearly exactly 3 months for 10,000 bugs. The bug rate increased a little bit during the last weeks, probably because of the freeze approaching.

We're therefore getting more clues about the time when bug #800000 for which we have bets. will be reported. At current rate, this should happen in one year. So, the current favorites are Knuth Posern or Kartik Mistry. Still, David Prévot, Andreas Tille, Elmar Heeb and Rafael Laboissiere have their chances, too, if the bug rate increases (I'll watch you guys: any MBF by one of you will be suspect...:-)).

01 September, 2014 06:02AM

August 31, 2014

hackergotchi for Junichi Uekawa

Junichi Uekawa

I was staring at qemu source for a while last month.

I was staring at qemu source for a while last month. There's a lot of things that I don't understand about the codebase. There's a race but it's hard to tell why a SIGSEGV was received.

31 August, 2014 10:14PM by Junichi Uekawa

Tim Retout

Website revamp

This weekend I moved my blog to a different server. This meant I could:

I've tested it, and it's working. I'm hoping that I can swap out the Node.js modules one-by-one for the Debian-packaged versions.

31 August, 2014 10:04PM

Stefano Zacchiroli

debsources hacking

Debsources now has a HACKING file

Here at DebConf14 I have given a few talks. The second one has been a technical talk about recent and future developments on Debsources. Both the talk slides and video are available.

After the talk, various DebConf participants have approached me and started hacking on Debsources, which is awesome! As a result of their work, new shiny features will probably be announced shortly. Stay tuned.

When discussing with new contributors (hi Luciano, Raphael!), though, it quickly became clear that getting started with Debsources hacking wasn't particularly easy. In particular, doing a local deployment for testing purposes might be intimidating, due to the need of having a (partial) source mirror and whatnot. To fix that, I have now written a HACKING file for Debsources, which you can find at top-level in the Git repo.

Happy Debsources hacking!

31 August, 2014 08:02PM

Thorsten Alteholz

My Debian activities in August 2014

FTP assistant

By pure chance I was able to accept 237 packages, the same number as last month. 33 times I contacted the maintainer to ask a question about a package and 55 times I had to reject a package. The reject number increased a bit as I also worked on packages that already got a note but had not been fully processed. In contrast I only filed three serious bugs this month.

Currently there are about 200 packages still waiting in the NEW queue As the freeze for Jessie comes closer every day, I wonder whether all of them can be processed in time. So I don’t mind if every maintainer checks the package again and maybe uploads an improved version that can be processed faster.

Squeeze LTS

This was my second month that I did some work for the Squeeze LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian

All in all I got assigned a workload of 16.5h for August. I spent these hours to upload new versions of

  • [DLA 32-1] nspr security update
  • [DLA 34-1] libapache-mod-security security update
  • [DLA 36-1] polarssl security update
  • [DLA 37-1] krb5 security update
  • [DLA 39-1] gpgme1.0 security update
  • [DLA 41-1] python-imaging security update

As last month I prepared these uploads on the basis of the corresponding DSAs for Wheezy. For these packages backporting the Wheezy patches to Squeeze was rather easy.

I also had a look at python-django and eglibc. Although the python-django patches apply now, the package fails some tests and these issues need some further investigation. In case of eglibc, my small pbuilder didn’t have enough resources and trying to build the package resulted in a full disk after more than three hours of work.

For PHP5 Ondřej Surý (the real maintainer) suggested to use point releases of upstream instead of applying only patches. I am curious about how much effort is needed for this approach. Stay tuned, next month you will be told more details!

Anyway, this is still a lot of fun and I hope I can finish python-django, eglibc and php5 in September.

Other packages

This month my meep packages plus mpb have been part of a small hdf5 transition. All five packages needed a small patch and a new upload. As the patch was already provided by Gilles Filippini, this was done rather quickly.

Support

If you would like to support my Debian work you could either be part of the Freexian initiative (see above) or consider to send some bitcoins to 1JHnNpbgzxkoNexeXsTUGS6qUp5P88vHej. Contact me at donation@alteholz.eu if you prefer another way to donate. Every kind of support is most appreciated.

31 August, 2014 04:42PM by alteholz

hackergotchi for Ritesh Raj Sarraf

Ritesh Raj Sarraf

apt-offline 1.4

apt-offline 1.4 has been released [1]. This is a minor bug fix release. In fact, one feature, offline bug reports (--bug-reports),  has been dropped for now.

The Debian BTS interface seems to have changed over time and the older debianbts.py module (that used the CGI interface) does not seem to work anymore. The current debbugs.py module seems to have switched to the SOAP interface.

There are a lot of changes going on personally, I just haven't had the time to spend. If anyone would like to help, please reach out to me. We need to use the new debbugs.py module. And it should be cross-platform.

Also, thanks to Hans-Christoph Steiner for providing the bash completion script.

[1] https://alioth.debian.org/projects/apt-offline/

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31 August, 2014 04:41PM by Ritesh Raj Sarraf

Russell Coker

hackergotchi for Steve Kemp

Steve Kemp

A diversion - The National Health Service

Today we have a little diversion to talk about the National Health Service. The NHS is the publicly funded healthcare system in the UK.

Actually there are four such services in the UK, only one of which has this name:

  • The national health service (England)
  • Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland.
  • NHS Scotland.
  • NHS Wales.

In theory this doesn't matter, if you're in the UK and you break your leg you get carried to a hospital and you get treated. There are differences in policies because different rules apply, but the basic stuff "free health care" applies to all locations.

(Differences? In Scotland you get eye-tests for free, in England you pay.)

My wife works as an accident & emergency doctor, and has recently changed jobs. Hearing her talk about her work is fascinating.

The hospitals she's worked in (Dundee, Perth, Kirkcaldy, Edinburgh, Livingstone) are interesting places. During the week things are usually reasonably quiet, and during the weekend things get significantly more busy. (This might mean there are 20 doctors to hand, versus three at quieter times.)

Weekends are busy largely because people fall down hills, get drunk and fight, and are at home rather than at work - where 90% of accidents occur.

Of course even a "quiet" week can be busy, because folk will have heart-attacks round the clock, and somebody somewhere will always be playing with a power tool, a ladder, or both!

So what was the point of this post? Well she's recently transferred to working for a childrens hospital (still in A&E) and the patiences are so very different.

I expected the injuries/patients she'd see to differ. Few 10 year olds will arrive drunk (though it does happen), and few adults fall out of trees, or eat washing machine detergent, but talking to her about her day when she returns home is fascinating how many things are completely different from how I expected.

Adults come to hospital mostly because they're sick, injured, or drunk.

Children come to hospital mostly because their parents are paranoid.

A child has a rash? Doctors are closed? Lets go to the emergency ward!

A child has fallen out of a tree and has a bruise, a lump, or complains of pain? Doctors are closed? Lets go to the emergency ward!

I've not kept statistics, though I wish I could, but it seems that she can go 3-5 days between seeing an actually injured or chronicly-sick child. It's the first-time-parents who bring kids in when they don't need to.

Understandable, completely understandable, but at the same time I'm sure it is more than a little frustrating for all involved.

Finally one thing I've learned, which seems completely stupid, is the NHS-Scotland approach to recruitment. You apply for a role, such as "A&E doctor" and after an interview, etc, you get told "You've been accepted - you will now work in Glasgow".

In short you apply for a post, and then get told where it will be based afterward. There's no ability to say "I'd like to be a Doctor in city X - where I live", you apply, and get told where it is post-acceptance. If it is 100+ miles away you either choose to commute, or decline and go through the process again.

This has lead to Kirsi working in hospitals with a radius of about 100km from the city we live in, and has meant she's had to turn down several posts.

And that is all I have to say about the NHS for the moment, except for the implicit pity for people who have to pay (inflated and life-changing) prices for things in other countries.

31 August, 2014 11:51AM

hackergotchi for Lucas Nussbaum

Lucas Nussbaum

Debian trivia

After an intensive evening of brainstorming by the 5th floor cabal, I am happy to release the very first version of the Debian Trivia, modeled after the famous TCP/IP Drinking Game. Only the questions are listed here — maybe they should go (with the answers) into a package? Anyone willing to co-maintain? Any suggestions for additional questions?

  • what was the first release with an “and-a-half” release?
  • Where were the first two DebConf held?
  • what are Debian releases named after? Why?
  • Give two names of girls that were originally part of the Debian Archive Kit (dak), that are still actively used today.
  • Swirl on chin. Does it ring a bell?
  • What was Dunc Tank about? Who was the DPL at the time? Who were the release managers during Dunc Tank?
  • Cite 5 different valid values for a package’s urgency field. Are all of them different?
  • When was the Debian Maintainers status created?
  • What is the codename for experimental?
  • Order correctly lenny, woody, etch, sarge
  • Which one was the Dunc Tank release?
  • Name three locations where Debian machines are hosted.
  • What does the B in projectb stand for?
  • What is the official card game at DebConf?
  • Describe the Debian restricted use logo.
  • One Debian release was frozen for more than a year. Which one?
  • name the kernel version for sarge, etch, lenny, squeeze, wheezy. bonus for etch-n-half!
  • What happened to Debian 1.0?
  • Which DebConfs were held in a Nordic country?
  • What does piuparts stand for?
  • Name the first Debian release.
  • Order correctly hamm, bo, potato, slink
  • What are most Debian project machines named after?

31 August, 2014 08:42AM by lucas

hackergotchi for Alexander Wirt

Alexander Wirt

cgit on alioth.debian.org

Recently I was doing some work on the alioth infrastructure like fixing things or cleaning up things.

One of the more visible things I done was the switch from gitweb to cgit. cgit is a lot of faster and looks better than gitweb.

The list of repositories is generated every hour. The move also has the nice effect that user repositories are available via the cgit index again.

I don’t plan to disable the old gitweb, but I created a bunch of redirect rules that - hopefully - redirect most use cases of gitweb to the equivalent cgit url.

If I broke something, please tell me, if I missed a common use case, please tell me. You can usually reach me on #alioth@oftc or via mail (formorer@d.o)

People also asked me to upload my cgit package to Debian, the package is now waiting in NEW. Thanks to Nicolas Dandrimont (olasd) we also have a patch included that generates proper HTTP returncodes if repos doesn’t exist.

31 August, 2014 04:52AM

August 30, 2014

hackergotchi for Francois Marier

Francois Marier

Outsourcing your webapp maintenance to Debian

Modern web applications are much more complicated than the simple Perl CGI scripts or PHP pages of the past. They usually start with a framework and include lots of external components both on the front-end and on the back-end.

Here's an example from the Node.js back-end of a real application:

$ npm list | wc -l
256

What if one of these 256 external components has a security vulnerability? How would you know and what would you do if of your direct dependencies had a hard-coded dependency on the vulnerable version? It's a real problem and of course one way to avoid this is to write everything yourself. But that's neither realistic nor desirable.

However, it's not a new problem. It was solved years ago by Linux distributions for C and C++ applications. For some reason though, this learning has not propagated to the web where the standard approach seems to be to "statically link everything".

What if we could build on the work done by Debian maintainers and the security team?

Case study - the Libravatar project

As a way of discussing a different approach to the problem of dependency management in web applications, let me describe the decisions made by the Libravatar project.

Description

Libravatar is a federated and free software alternative to the Gravatar profile photo hosting site.

From a developer point of view, it's a fairly simple stack:

The service is split between the master node, where you create an account and upload your avatar, and a few mirrors, which serve the photos to third-party sites.

Like with Gravatar, sites wanting to display images don't have to worry about a complicated protocol. In a nutshell, all that a site needs to do is hash the user's email and add that hash to a base URL. Where the federation kicks in is that every email domain is able to specify a different base URL via an SRV record in DNS.

For example, francois@debian.org hashes to 7cc352a2907216992f0f16d2af50b070 and so the full URL is:

http://cdn.libravatar.org/avatar/7cc352a2907216992f0f16d2af50b070

whereas francois@fmarier.org hashes to 0110e86fdb31486c22dd381326d99de9 and the full URL is:

http://fmarier.org/avatar/0110e86fdb31486c22dd381326d99de9

due to the presence of an SRV record on fmarier.org.

Ground rules

The main rules that the project follows is to:

  1. only use Python libraries that are in Debian
  2. use the versions present in the latest stable release (including backports)

Deployment using packages

In addition to these rules around dependencies, we decided to treat the application as if it were going to be uploaded to Debian:

  • It includes an "upstream" Makefile which minifies CSS and JavaScript, gzips them, and compiles PO files (i.e. a "build" step).
  • The Makefile includes a test target which runs the unit tests and some lint checks (pylint, pyflakes and pep8).
  • Debian packages are produced to encode the dependencies in the standard way as well as to run various setup commands in maintainer scripts and install cron jobs.
  • The project runs its own package repository using reprepro to easily distribute these custom packages.
  • In order to update the repository and the packages installed on servers that we control, we use fabric, which is basically a fancy way to run commands over ssh.
  • Mirrors can simply add our repository to their apt sources.list and upgrade Libravatar packages at the same time as their system packages.

Results

Overall, this approach has been quite successful and Libravatar has been a very low-maintenance service to run.

The ground rules have however limited our choice of libraries. For example, to talk to our queuing system, we had to use the raw Python bindings to the C Gearman library instead of being able to use a nice pythonic library which wasn't in Debian squeeze at the time.

There is of course always the possibility of packaging a missing library for Debian and maintaining a backport of it until the next Debian release. This wouldn't be a lot of work considering the fact that responsible bundling of a library would normally force you to follow its releases closely and keep any dependencies up to date, so you may as well share the result of that effort. But in the end, it turns out that there is a lot of Python stuff already in Debian and we haven't had to package anything new yet.

Another thing that was somewhat scary, due to the number of packages that were going to get bumped to a new major version, was the upgrade from squeeze to wheezy. It turned out however that it was surprisingly easy to upgrade to wheezy's version of Django, Apache and Postgres. It may be a problem next time, but all that means is that you have to set a day aside every 2 years to bring everything up to date.

Problems

The main problem we ran into is that we optimized for sysadmins and unfortunately made it harder for new developers to setup their environment. That's not very good from the point of view of welcoming new contributors as there is quite a bit of friction in preparing and testing your first patch. That's why we're looking at encoding our setup instructions into a Vagrant script so that new contributors can get started quickly.

Another problem we faced is that because we use the Debian version of jQuery and minify our own JavaScript files in the build step of the Makefile, we were affected by the removal from that package of the minified version of jQuery. In our setup, there is no way to minify JavaScript files that are provided by other packages and so the only way to fix this would be to fork the package in our repository or (preferably) to work with the Debian maintainer and get it fixed globally in Debian.

One thing worth noting is that while the Django project is very good at issuing backwards-compatible fixes for security issues, sometimes there is no way around disabling broken features. In practice, this means that we cannot run unattended-upgrades on our main server in case something breaks. Instead, we make use of apticron to automatically receive email reminders for any outstanding package updates.

On that topic, it can occasionally take a while for security updates to be released in Debian, but this usually falls into one of two cases:

  1. You either notice because you're already tracking releases pretty well and therefore could help Debian with backporting of fixes and/or testing;
  2. or you don't notice because it has slipped through the cracks or there simply are too many potential things to keep track of, in which case the fact that it eventually gets fixed without your intervention is a huge improvement.

Finally, relying too much on Debian packaging does prevent Fedora users (a project that also makes use of Libravatar) from easily contributing mirrors. Though if we had a concrete offer, we would certainly look into creating the appropriate RPMs.

Is it realistic?

It turns out that I'm not the only one who thought about this approach, which has been named "debops". The same day that my talk was announced on the DebConf website, someone emailed me saying that he had instituted the exact same rules at his company, which operates a large Django-based web application in the US and Russia. It was pretty impressive to read about a real business coming to the same conclusions and using the same approach (i.e. system libraries, deployment packages) as Libravatar.

Regardless of this though, I think there is a class of applications that are particularly well-suited for the approach we've just described. If a web application is not your full-time job and you want to minimize the amount of work required to keep it running, then it's a good investment to restrict your options and leverage the work of the Debian community to simplify your maintenance burden.

The second criterion I would look at is framework maturity. Given the 2-3 year release cycle of stable distributions, this approach is more likely to work with a mature framework like Django. After all, you probably wouldn't compile Apache from source, but until recently building Node.js from source was the preferred option as it was changing so quickly.

While it goes against conventional wisdom, relying on system libraries is a sustainable approach you should at least consider in your next project. After all, there is a real cost in bundling and keeping up with external dependencies.

This blog post is based on a talk I gave at DebConf 14: slides, video.

30 August, 2014 09:45PM

John Goerzen

2AM to Seattle

Monday morning, 1:45AM.

Laura and I walk into the boys’ room. We turn on the light. Nothing happens. (They’re sound sleepers.)

“Boys, it’s time to get up to go get on the train!”

Four eyes pop open. “Yay! Oh I’m so excited!”

And then, “Meow!” (They enjoy playing with their stuffed cats that Laura got them for Christmas.)

Before long, it was out the door to the train station. We even had time to stop at a donut shop along the way.

We climbed into our family bedroom (a sleeping car room on Amtrak specifically designed for families of four), and as the train started to move, the excitement of what was going on crept in. Yes, it’s 2:42AM, but these are two happy boys:

2014-08-04 02

Jacob and Oliver love trains, and this was the beginning of a 3-day train trip from Newton to Seattle that would take us through Kansas, Colorado, the Rocky Mountains of New Mexico, Arizona, Los Angeles, up the California coast, through the Cascades, and on to Seattle. Whew!

Here we are later that morning before breakfast:

IMG_3776

Here’s our train at a station stop in La Junta, CO:

IMG_3791

And at the beautiful small mountain town of Raton, NM:

IMG_3805

Some of the passing scenery in New Mexico:

IMG_3828

Through it all, we found many things to pass the time. I don’t think anybody was bored. I took the boys “exploring the train” several times — we’d walk from one end to the other and see what all was there. There was always the dining car for our meals, the lounge car for watching the passing scenery, and on the Coast Starlight, the Pacific Parlor Car.

Here we are getting ready for breakfast one morning.

IMG_3830

Getting to select meals and order in the “train restaurant” was a big deal for the boys.

IMG_3832

Laura brought one of her origami books, which even managed to pull the boys away from the passing scenery in the lounge car for quite some time.

IMG_3848

Origami is serious business:

IMG_3869

They had some fun wrapping themselves around my feet and challenging me to move. And were delighted when I could move even though they were trying to weight me down!

IMG_3880

Several games of Uno were played, but even those sometimes couldn’t compete with the passing scenery:

IMG_3898

The Coast Starlight features the Pacific Parlor Car, which was built over 50 years ago for the Santa Fe Hi-Level trains. They’ve been updated; the upper level is a lounge and small restaurant, and the lower level has been turned into a small theater. They show movies in there twice a day, but most of the time, the place is empty. A great place to go with little boys to run around and play games.

IMG_3896

The boys and I sort of invented a new game: roadrunner and coyote, loosely based on the old Looney Tunes cartoons. Jacob and Oliver would be roadrunners, running around and yelling “MEEP MEEP!” Meanwhile, I was the coyote, who would try to catch them — even briefly succeeding sometimes — but ultimately fail in some hilarious way. It burned a lot of energy.

And, of course, the parlor car was good for scenery-watching too:

IMG_3908

We were right along the Pacific Ocean for several hours – sometimes there would be a highway or a town between us and the beach, but usually there was nothing at all between us and the coast. It was beautiful to watch the jagged coastline go by, to gaze out onto the ocean, watching the birds — apparently so beautiful that I didn’t even think to take some photos.

Laura’s parents live in California, and took a connecting train. I had arranged for them to have a sleeping car room near ours, so for the last day of the trip, we had a group of 6. Here are the boys with their grandparents at lunch Wednesday:

2014-08-06 11

We stepped off the train in Seattle into beautiful King Street Station.

P8100197

Our first day in Seattle was a quiet day of not too much. Laura’s relatives live near Lake Washington, so we went out there to play. The boys enjoyed gathering black rocks along the shore.

IMG_3956

We went blackberry picking after that – filled up buckets for a cobbler.

The next day, we rode the Seattle Monorail. The boys have been talking about this for months — a kind of train they’ve never been on. That was the biggest thing in their minds that they were waiting for. They got to ride in the very front, by the operator.

P8080073

Nice view from up there.

P8080078

We walked through the Pike Market — I hadn’t been in such a large and crowded place like that since I was in Guadalajara:

P8080019

At the Seattle Aquarium, we all had a great time checking out all the exhibits. The “please touch” one was a particular hit.

P8080038

Walking underneath the salmon tank was fun too.

We spent a couple of days doing things closer to downtown. Laura’s cousin works at MOHAI, the Museum of History and Industry, so we spent a morning there. The boys particularly enjoyed the old periscope mounted to the top of the building, and the exhibit on chocolate (of course!)

P8100146

They love any kind of transportation, so of course we had to get a ride on the Seattle Streetcar that comes by MOHAI.

P8090094

All weekend long, we had been noticing the seaplanes taking off from Lake Washington and Lake Union (near MOHAI). So finally I decided to investigate, and one morning while Laura was doing things with her cousin, the boys and I took a short seaplane ride from one lake to another, and then rode every method of transportation we could except for ferries (we did that the next day). Here is our Kenmore Air plane:

P8100100

The view of Lake Washington from 1000 feet was beautiful:

P8100109

I think we got a better view than the Space Needle, and it probably cost about the same anyhow.

P8100117

After splashdown, we took the streetcar to a place where we could eat lunch right by the monorail tracks. Then we rode the monorail again. Then we caught a train (it went underground a bit so it was a “subway” to them!) and rode it a few blocks.

There is even scenery underground, it seems.

P8100151

We rode a bus back, and saved one last adventure for the next day: a ferry to Bainbridge Island.

2014-08-11 14

2014-08-11 16

Laura and I even got some time to ourselves to go have lunch at an amazing Greek restaurant to celebrate a year since we got engaged. It’s amazing to think that, by now, it’s only a few months until our wedding anniversary too!

There are many special memories of the weekend I could mention — visiting with Laura’s family, watching the boys play with her uncle’s pipe organ (it’s in his house!), watching the boys play with their grandparents, having all six of us on the train for a day, flying paper airplanes off the balcony, enjoying the cool breeze on the ferry and the beautiful mountains behind the lake. One of my favorites is waking up to high-pitched “Meow? Meow meow meow! Wake up, brother!” sorts of sounds. There was so much cat-play on the trip, and it was cute to hear. I have the feeling we won’t hear things like that much more.

So many times on the trip I heard, “Oh dad, I am so excited!” I never get tired of hearing that. And, of course, I was excited, too.

30 August, 2014 05:11PM by John Goerzen

hackergotchi for Joachim Breitner

Joachim Breitner

DebConf 14

I’m writing this blog post on the plain from Portland towards Europe (which I now can!), using the remaining battery live after having watched one of the DebConf talks that I missed. (It was the systemd talk, which was good and interesting, but maybe I should have watched one of the power management talks, as my battery is running down faster than it should be, I believe.)

I mostly enjoyed this year’s DebConf. I must admit that I did not come very prepared: I had neither something urgent to hack on, nor important things to discuss with the other attendees, so in a way I had a slow start. I also felt a bit out of touch with the project, both personally and technically: In previous DebConfs, I had more interest in many different corners of the project, and also came with more naive enthusiasm. After more than 10 years in the project, I see a few things more realistic and also more relaxed, and don’t react on “Wouldn’t it be cool to have crazy idea” very easily any more. And then I mostly focus on Haskell packaging (and related tooling, which sometimes is also relevant and useful to others) these days, which is not very interesting to most others.

But in the end I did get to do some useful hacking, heard a few interesting talks and even got a bit excited: I created a new tool to schedule binNMUs for Haskell packages which is quite generic (configured by just a regular expression), so that it can and will be used by the OCaml team as well, and who knows who else will start using hash-based virtual ABI packages in the future... It runs via a cron job on people.debian.org to produce output for Haskell and for OCaml, based on data pulled via HTTP. If you are a Debian developer and want up-to-date results, log into wuiet.debian.org and run ~nomeata/binNMUs --sql; it then uses the projectb and wanna-build databases directly. Thanks to the ftp team for opening up incoming.debian.org, by the way!

Unsurprisingly, I also held a talk on Haskell and Debian (slides available). I talked a bit too long and we had too little time for discussion, but in any case not all discussion would have fitted in 45 minutes. The question of which packages from Hackage should be added to Debian and which not is still undecided (which means we carry on packaging what we happen to want in Debian for whatever reason). I guess the better our tooling gets (see the next section), the more easily we can support more and more packages.

I am quite excited by and supportive of Enrico’s agenda to remove boilerplate data from the debian/ directories and relying on autodebianization tools. We have such a tool for Haskell package, cabal-debian, but it is unofficial, i.e. neither created by us nor fully endorsed. I want to change that, so I got in touch with the upstream maintainer and we want to get it into shape for producing perfect Debian packages, if the upstream provided meta data is perfect. I’d like to see the Debian Haskell Group to follows Enrico’s plan to its extreme conclusion, and this way drive innovation in Debian in general. We’ll see how that goes.

Besides all the technical program I enjoyed the obligatory games of Mao and Werewolves. I also got to dance! On Saturday night, I found a small but welcoming Swing-In-The-Park event where I could dance a few steps of Lindy Hop. And on Tuesday night, Vagrant Cascadian took us (well, three of us) to a blues dancing night, which I greatly enjoyed: The style was so improvisation-friendly that despite having missed the introduction and never having danced Blues before I could jump right in. And in contrast to social dances in Germany, where it is often announced that the girls are also invited to ask the boys, but then it is still mostly the boys who have to ask, here I took only half a minute of standing at the side until I got asked to dance. In retrospect I should have skipped the HP reception and went there directly...

I’m not heading home at the moment, but will travel directly to Göteborg to attend ICFP 2014. I hope the (usually worse) west-to-east jet lag will not prevent me from enjoying that as much as I could.

30 August, 2014 03:10PM by Joachim Breitner (mail@joachim-breitner.de)

hackergotchi for Gergely Nagy

Gergely Nagy

Happy

For the past decade or so, I wasn't exactly happy. I struggled with low self esteem, likely bordered on depression at times. I disappointed friends, family and most of all, myself. There were times I not only disliked the person I was, but hated it. This wasn't healthy, nor forward-looking, I knew that all along, and that made the situation even worse. I tried to maintain a more enthusiastic mask, pretended that nothing's wrong. Being fully aware that there actually is nothing terribly wrong, while still feeling worthless, just added insult to injury.

In the past few years, things started to improve. I had a job, things to care about, things to feel passionate about, people around me who knew nothing about the shadows on my heart, yet still smiled, still supported me. But years of self loathing does not disappear overnight.

Then one day, some six months ago, my world turned upside down. Years of disappointment, hate and loathing - poof, gone. Today, I'm happy. This is something I have not been able to tell myself in all honesty in this century yet (except maybe for very brief periods of time, when I was happy for someone else).

[Engaged]

A little over six months ago, I met someone, someone I could open up to. I still remember the first hour, where we talked about our own shortcomings and bad habits. At the end of the day, when She ordered me a crazy-pancake (a pancake with half a dozen random fillings), I felt happy. She is everything I could ever wish for, and more. She isn't just the woman I love, with whom I'll say the words in a couple of months. She's much more than a partner, a friend a soul-mate combined in one person. She is my inspiration, my role model and my Guardian Angel too.

I no longer feel worthless, nor inadequate. I am disappointed with myself no more. I do not hate, I do not loathe, and past mistakes, past feelings seem so far away! I can share everything with Her, She does not judge, nor condemn: she supports and helps. With Her, I am happy. With Her, I am who I wanted myself to be. With Her, I am complete.

Thank You.

30 August, 2014 06:16AM by Gergely Nagy

hackergotchi for Matthew Palmer

Matthew Palmer

Chromium tabs crashing and not rendering correctly?

If you’ve noticed your chrome/chromium on Linux having problems since you upgraded to somewhere around version 35/36, you’re not alone. Thankfully, it’s relatively easy to workaround. It will hit people who keep their browser open for a long time, or who have lots of tabs (or if you’re like me, and do both).

To tell if you’re suffering from this particular problem, crack open your ~/.xsession-errors file (or wherever your system logs stdout/stderr from programs running under X), and look for lines that look like this:

[22161:22185:0830/124533:ERROR:shared_memory_posix.cc(231)]
Creating shared memory in /dev/shm/.org.chromium.Chromium.gFTQSy
failed: Too many open files

And

[22161:22185:0830/124601:ERROR:host_shared_bitmap_manager.cc(122)]
Cannot create shared memory buffer

If you see those errors, congratulations! The rest of this blog post will be of use to you.

There’s probably a myriad of bugs open about this problem, but the one I found was #367037: Shared memory-related tab crash. It turns out there’s a file handle leak in the chromium codebase somewhere, relating to shared memory handling. There’s no fix available, but the workaround is quite simple: increase the number of files that processes are allowed to have open.

System-wide, you can do this by creating a file /etc/security/limits.d/local-nofile.conf, containing this line:

* - nofile 65535

You could also edit /etc/security/limits.conf to contain the same line, if you were so inclined. Note that this will only take effect next time you login, or perhaps even only when you restart X (or, at worst, your entire machine).

This doesn’t help you if you’ve got Chromium already open and you’d like to stop it from crashing Right Now (perhaps restarting your machine would be a terrible hardship, causing you to lose your hard-won uptime record), then you can use a magical tool called prlimit.

The prlimit syscall is available if you’re running a Linux 2.6.36 or later kernel, and running at least glibc 2.13. You’ll have a prlimit command line program if you’ve got util-linux 2.21 or later. If not, you can use the example source code in the prlimit(2) manpage, changing RLIMIT_CPU to RLIMIT_NOFILE, and then running it like this:

prlimit <PID> 65535 65535

The <PID> argument is taken from the first number in the log messages from .xsession-errors – in the example above, it’s 22161.

And now, you can go back to using your tabs as ersatz bookmarks, like I do.

30 August, 2014 03:45AM by Matt Palmer (mpalmer@hezmatt.org)

hackergotchi for Dirk Eddelbuettel

Dirk Eddelbuettel

BH release 1.54.0-4

Another small new release of our BH package providing Boost headers for use by R is now on CRAN. This one brings a one-file change: the file any.hpp comprising the Boost.Any library --- as requested by a fellow package maintainer needing it for a pending upload to CRAN.

No other changes were made.

Changes in version 1.54.0-4 (2014-08-29)

  • Added Boost Any requested by Greg Jeffries for his nabo package

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the most recent release.

Comments and suggestions are welcome via the mailing list or issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

30 August, 2014 02:02AM

August 29, 2014

hackergotchi for Steve Kemp

Steve Kemp

Migration of services and hosts

Yesterday I carried out the upgrade of a Debian host from Squeeze to Wheezy for a friend. I like doing odd-jobs like this as they're generally painless, and when there are problems it is a fun learning experience.

I accidentally forgot to check on the status of the MySQL server on that particular host, which was a little embarassing, but later put together a reasonably thorough serverspec recipe to describe how the machine should be setup, which will avoid that problem in the future - Introduction/tutorial here.

The more I use serverspec the more I like it. My own personal servers have good rules now:

shelob ~/Repos/git.steve.org.uk/server/testing $ make
..
Finished in 1 minute 6.53 seconds
362 examples, 0 failures

Slow, but comprehensive.

In other news I've now migrated every single one of my personal mercurial repositories over to git. I didn't have a particular reason for doing that, but I've started using git more and more for collaboration with others and using two systems felt like an annoyance.

That means I no longer have to host two different kinds of repositories, and I can use the excellent gitbucket software on my git repository host.

Needless to say I wrote a policy for this host too:

#
#  The host should be wheezy.
#
describe command("lsb_release -d") do
  its(:stdout) { should match /wheezy/ }
end


#
# Our gitbucket instance should be running, under runit.
#
describe supervise('gitbucket') do
  its(:status) { should eq 'run' }
end

#
# nginx will proxy to our back-end
#
describe service('nginx') do
  it { should be_enabled   }
  it { should be_running   }
end
describe port(80) do
  it { should be_listening }
end

#
#  Host should resolve
#
describe host("git.steve.org.uk" ) do
  it { should be_resolvable.by('dns') }
end

Simple stuff, but being able to trigger all these kind of tests, on all my hosts, with one command, is very reassuring.

29 August, 2014 01:28PM

Jakub Wilk

More spell-checking

Have you ever wanted to use Lintian's spell-checker against arbitrary files? Now you can do it with spellintian:

$ zrun spellintian --picky /usr/share/doc/RFC/best-current-practice/rfc*
/tmp/0qgJD1Xa1Y-rfc1917.txt: amoung -> among
/tmp/kvZtN435CE-rfc3155.txt: transfered -> transferred
/tmp/o093khYE09-rfc3481.txt: unecessary -> unnecessary
/tmp/4P0ux2cZWK-rfc6365.txt: charater -> character

mwic (Misspelled Words In Context) takes a different approach. It uses classic spell-checking libraries (via Enchant), but it groups misspellings and shows them in their contexts. That way you can quickly filter out false-positives, which are very common in technical texts, using visual grep:

$ zrun mwic /usr/share/doc/debian/social-contract.txt.gz
DFSG:
| …an Free Software Guidelines (DFSG)
| …an Free Software Guidelines (DFSG) part of the
                                ^^^^

Perens:
|    Bruce Perens later removed the Debian-spe…
| by Bruce Perens, refined by the other Debian…
           ^^^^^^

Ean, Schuessler:
| community" was suggested by Ean Schuessler. This document was drafted
                              ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^

GPL:
| The "GPL", "BSD", and "Artistic" lice…
       ^^^

contrib:
| created "contrib" and "non-free" areas in our…
           ^^^^^^^

CDs:
| their CDs. Thus, although non-free wor…
        ^^^

29 August, 2014 11:51AM

hackergotchi for Antti-Juhani Kaijanaho

Antti-Juhani Kaijanaho

Licentiate Thesis is now publicly available

My recently accepted Licentiate Thesis, which I posted about a couple of days ago, is now available in JyX.

Here is the abstract again for reference:

Kaijanaho, Antti-Juhani
The extent of empirical evidence that could inform evidence-based design of programming languages. A systematic mapping study.
Jyväskylä: University of Jyväskylä, 2014, 243 p.
(Jyväskylä Licentiate Theses in Computing,
ISSN 1795-9713; 18)
ISBN 978-951-39-5790-2 (nid.)
ISBN 978-951-39-5791-9 (PDF)
Finnish summary

Background: Programming language design is not usually informed by empirical studies. In other fields similar problems have inspired an evidence-based paradigm of practice. Central to it are secondary studies summarizing and consolidating the research literature. Aims: This systematic mapping study looks for empirical research that could inform evidence-based design of programming languages. Method: Manual and keyword-based searches were performed, as was a single round of snowballing. There were 2056 potentially relevant publications, of which 180 were selected for inclusion, because they reported empirical evidence on the efficacy of potential design decisions and were published on or before 2012. A thematic synthesis was created. Results: Included studies span four decades, but activity has been sparse until the last five years or so. The form of conditional statements and loops, as well as the choice between static and dynamic typing have all been studied empirically for efficacy in at least five studies each. Error proneness, programming comprehension, and human effort are the most common forms of efficacy studied. Experimenting with programmer participants is the most popular method. Conclusions: There clearly are language design decisions for which empirical evidence regarding efficacy exists; they may be of some use to language designers, and several of them may be ripe for systematic reviewing. There is concern that the lack of interest generated by studies in this topic area until the recent surge of activity may indicate serious issues in their research approach.

Keywords: programming languages, programming language design, evidence-based paradigm, efficacy, research methods, systematic mapping study, thematic synthesis

29 August, 2014 08:45AM by Antti-Juhani Kaijanaho

hackergotchi for Daniel Pocock

Daniel Pocock

Welcoming libphonenumber to Debian and Ubuntu

Google's libphonenumber is a universal library for parsing, validating, identifying and formatting phone numbers. It works quite well for numbers from just about anywhere. Here is a Java code sample (C++ and JavaScript also supported) from their web site:


String swissNumberStr = "044 668 18 00";
PhoneNumberUtil phoneUtil = PhoneNumberUtil.getInstance();
try {
  PhoneNumber swissNumberProto = phoneUtil.parse(swissNumberStr, "CH");
} catch (NumberParseException e) {
  System.err.println("NumberParseException was thrown: " + e.toString());
}
boolean isValid = phoneUtil.isValidNumber(swissNumberProto); // returns true
// Produces "+41 44 668 18 00"
System.out.println(phoneUtil.format(swissNumberProto, PhoneNumberFormat.INTERNATIONAL));
// Produces "044 668 18 00"
System.out.println(phoneUtil.format(swissNumberProto, PhoneNumberFormat.NATIONAL));
// Produces "+41446681800"
System.out.println(phoneUtil.format(swissNumberProto, PhoneNumberFormat.E164));

This is particularly useful for anybody working with international phone numbers. This is a common requirement in the world of VoIP where people mix-and-match phones and hosted PBXes in different countries and all their numbers have to be normalized.

About the packages

The new libphonenumber package provides support for C++ and Java users. Upstream also supports JavaScript but that hasn't been packaged yet.

Using libphonenumber from Evolution and other software

Lumicall, the secure SIP/ZRTP client for Android, has had libphonenumber from the beginning. It is essential when converting dialed numbers into E.164 format to make ENUM queries and it is also helpful to normalize all the numbers before passing them to VoIP gateways.

Debian includes the GNOME Evolution suite and it will use libphonenumber to improve handling of phone numbers in contact records if enabled at compile time. Fredrik has submitted a patch for that in Debian.

Many more applications can potentially benefit from this too. libphonenumber is released under an Apache license so it is compatible with the Mozilla license and suitable for use in Thunderbird plugins.

Improving libphonenumber

It is hard to keep up with the changes in dialing codes around the world. Phone companies and sometimes even whole countries come and go from time to time. Numbering plans change to add extra digits. New prefixes are created for new mobile networks. libphonenumber contains metadata for all the countries and telephone numbers that the authors are aware of but they also welcome feedback through their mailing list for anything that is not quite right.

Now that libphonenumber is available as a package, it may be helpful for somebody to try and find a way to split the metadata from the code so that metadata changes could be distributed through the stable updates catalog along with other volatile packages such as anti-virus patterns.

29 August, 2014 08:02AM by Daniel.Pocock

Robert Collins

Test processes as servers

Since its very early days subunit has had a single model – you run a process, it outputs test results. This works great, except when it doesn’t.

On the up side, you have a one way pipeline – there’s no interactivity needed, which makes it very very easy to write a subunit backend that e.g. testr can use.

On the downside, there’s no interactivity, which means that anytime you want to do something with those tests, a new process is needed – and thats sometimes quite expensive – particularly in test suites with 10’s of thousands of tests.Now, for use in the development edit-execute loop, this is arguably ok, because one needs to load the new tests into memory anyway; but wouldn’t it be nice if tools like testr that run tests for you didn’t have to decide upfront exactly how they were going to run. If instead they could get things running straight away and then give progressively larger and larger units of work to be run, without forcing a new process (and thus new discovery directory walking and importing) ? Secondly, testr has an inconsistent interface – if testr is letting a user debug things to testr through to child workers in a chain, it needs to use something structured (e.g. subunit) and route stdin to the actual worker, but the final testr needs to unwrap everything – this is needlessly complex. Lastly, for some languages at least, its possibly to dynamically pick up new code at runtime – so a simple inotify loop and we could avoid new-process (and more importantly complete-enumeration) *entirely*, leading to very fast edit-test cycles.

So, in this blog post I’m really running this idea up the flagpole, and trying to sketch out the interface – and hopefully get feedback on it.

Taking subunit.run as an example process to do this to:

  1. There should be an option to change from one-shot to server mode
  2. In server mode, it will listen for commands somewhere (lets say stdin)
  3. On startup it might eager load the available tests
  4. One command would be list-tests – which would enumerate all the tests to its output channel (which is stdout today – so lets stay with that for now)
  5. Another would be run-tests, which would take a set of test ids, and then filter-and-run just those ids from the available tests, output, as it does today, going to stdout. Passing somewhat large sets of test ids in may be desirable, because some test runners perform fixture optimisations (e.g. bringing up DB servers or web servers) and test-at-a-time is pretty much worst case for that sort of environment.
  6. Another would be be std-in a command providing a packet of stdin – used for interacting with debuggers

So that seems pretty approachable to me – we don’t even need an async loop in there, as long as we’re willing to patch select etc (for the stdin handling in some environments like Twisted). If we don’t want to monkey patch like that, we’ll need to make stdin a socketpair, and have an event loop running to shepard bytes from the real stdin to the one we let the rest of Python have.

What about that nirvana above? If we assume inotify support, then list_tests (and run_tests) can just consult a changed-file list and reload those modules before continuing. Reloading them just-in-time would be likely to create havoc – I think reloading only when synchronised with test completion makes a great deal of sense.

Would such a test server make sense in other languages?  What about e.g. testtools.run vs subunit.run – such a server wouldn’t want to use subunit, but perhaps a regular CLI UI would be nice…


29 August, 2014 04:10AM

August 28, 2014

Russ Allbery

git-pbuilder 1.33

git-pbuilder is a script to integrate git-buildpackage with pbuilder or cowbuilder. My long-term hope is to rewrite it in Python and just incorporate it into git-buildpackage's source base directly, but in the meantime I've been maintaining it as a separate script.

This new release is a relatively minor bug fix. git-pbuilder has always removed the *_source.changes file built as part of the pbuilder process, since this file is normally useless. It's used to generate the source package to move into the chroot, but then the build in the chroot normally regenerates the Debian source package. The *_source.changes file hangs around with invalid checksums and just confuses matters, so git-pbuilder has always deleted it.

However, Debian is now increasing support for source-only uploads, which means that source-only builds might now be interesting. One can do a source-only build with gbp buildpackage -S. But that also generates a *_source.changes file, one that's actually useful, and git-pbuilder was deleting that as well. This release, thanks to work by Guido Günther, refrains from deleting this file when doing a source-only build.

You can get the latest release of git-pbuilder from my scripts distribution page.

28 August, 2014 11:37PM

hackergotchi for Bernhard R. Link

Bernhard R. Link

Where key expiry dates are useful and where they are not.

Some recent blog (here and here) suggest short key expiry times.

Then also highlight some thing many people forget: The expiry time of a key can be changed every time with just a new self-signature. Especially that can be made retroactively (you cannot avoid that, if you allow changing it: Nothing would stop an attacker from just changing the clock of one of his computers).

(By the way: did you know you can also reduce the validity time of a key? If you look at the resulting packets in your key, this is simply a revocation packet of the previous self-signature followed by a new self-signature with a shorter expiration date.)

In my eyes that fact has a very simple consequence: An expiry date on your gpg main key is almost totally worthless.

If you for example lose your private key and have no revocation certificate for it, then a expiry time will not help at all: Once someone else got the private key (for example by brute forcing it, as computers got faster over the years or because they could brute-force the pass-phrase for your backup they got somehow), they can just extend the expiry date and make it look like it is still valid. (And if they do not have the private key, there is nothing they can do anyway).

There is one place where expiration dates make much more sense, though: subkeys.

As the expiration date of a subkey is part of the signature of that subkey with the main key, someone having access to only the subkey cannot change the date.

This also makes it feasible to use new subkeys over the time, as you can let the previous subkey expire and use a new one. And only someone having the private main key (hopefully you), can extend its validity (or sign a new one).

(I generally suggest to always have a signing subkey and never ever use the main key except off-line to sign subkeys or other keys. The fact that it can sign other keys just makes the main key just too precious to operate it on-line (even if it is on some smartcard the reader cannot show you what you just sign)).

28 August, 2014 06:57PM

hackergotchi for Gunnar Wolf

Gunnar Wolf

Ongoing crypto handling discussions

I love to see there is a lot of crypto discussions going on at DebConf. Maybe I'm skewed by my role as keyring-maint, but I have been involved in more than one discussion every day on what do/should signatures mean, on best key handling practices, on some ideas to make key maintenance better, on how the OpenPGPv4 format lays out a key and its components on disk, all that. I enjoy some of those discussions pose questions that leave me thinking, as I am quite far from having all answers.

Discussions should be had face to face, but some start online and deserve to be answered online (and also pose opportunity to become documentation). Simon Josefsson blogs about The case for short OpenPGP key validity periods. This will be an important issue to tackle, as we will soon require keys in the Debian keyring to have a set expiration date (surprise surprise!) and I agree with Simon, setting an expiration date far in the future means very little.

There is a caveat with using, as he suggests, very short expiry periods: We have a human factor sitting in the middle. Keyring updates in Debian are done approximately once a month, and I do not see the period shortening. That means, only once a month we (currently Jonathan McDowell and myself, and we expect to add Daniel Kahn Gillmor soon) take the full changeset and compile a new keyring that replaces the active one in Debian.

This means that if you have, as Simon suggests, a 100-day validity key, you have to remember to update it at least every 70 days, or you might be locked out during the days it takes us to process it.

I set my expiration period to two years, although I might shorten it to only one. I expect to add checks+notifications before we enable this requirement project-wide (so that Debian servers will mail you when your key is close to expiry); I think that mail can be sent at approximately [expiry date - 90 days] to give you time both to you and to us to act. Probably the optimal expiration periods under such conditions would be between 180 and 365 days.

But, yes, this is by far not yet a ruling, but a point in the discussion. We still have some days of DebConf, and I'll enjoy revising this point. And Simon, even if we correct some bits for these details, I'd like to have your permission to use this fine blog post as part of our documentation!

(And on completely unrelated news: Congratulations to our dear and very much missed friend Bubulle for completely losing his sanity and running for 28 hours and a half straight! He briefly describes this adventure when it was about to start, and we all want him to tell us how it was. Mr. Running French Guy, you are amazing!)

28 August, 2014 03:04PM by gwolf

Lior Kaplan

The importance of close integration between distribution and upstream

Many package maintainers need to decide when to upload a new version to Debian. Should the upload be done only after the official release, or is there a place for uploads during the development process. In the latter case there’s a need to balance between the benefit of early testing and feedback with the stability and not completely breaking user’s environment (and package relationships) too often.

With the coming PHP 5.6.0 release, Debian kept being on the cutting edge. Thanks to Ondřej, the new version was available in experimental since alpha1 and in unstable/testing since beta3. Considering the timing of the PHP release related to the Debian freeze, I’m happy we started early, and did the transition to PHP 5.6 a few months ago.

But just following the development releases (betas ,RCs) isn’t enough. Both Ondřej and myself are part of the PHP community, and know the planned timelines, current status and what are the critical points. Such knowledge was very useful this week, when we new 5.6.0 was pending finale tagging before release (after RC4). This made take the report of Debian bug #759381: “php5: TLS connections broken in 5.6.0 RC4″ seriously and contact the release managers.

First it was a “heads up” and then a real problem. After a quick discussion (both private mails by me and on github by Ondřej), the relevant commit was reverted by the release managers (Julien Pauli & Ferenc Kovacs), and 5.6.0 was retagged. The issue will get more checks towards 5.6.1 without any time pressure.

Although 5.6.0 isn’t in production for anyone (yet), and like any major release can have issues, the close connectivity between everyone saved complaints from the PHP users and ecosystem. I don’t imagine the issue been sorted so quickly 16 hours later. This is also due to the bug been reported on difference between two close release (regression in RC4 comparing to RC3).

To close the loop, if we’ve uploaded 5.6.0 only after the release, the report would be regression between 5.5.x and 5.6.0, which is obviously much harder to pinpoint. So, I’m not sure I have a good answer for the question in the beginning of the post, but for this case our policy proved itself.


Filed under: Debian GNU/Linux, PHP

28 August, 2014 02:22PM by Kaplan

Tim Retout

Pump.io update 1

[The story so far: I'm packaging pump.io for Debian.]

4 packages uploaded to NEW:

  • node-webfinger
  • validator.js
  • websocket-driver
  • node-openid

2 packages eliminated as not needed:

  • set-immediate - deprecated
  • crypto-cacerts - not needed on Debian

1 package in progress:

  • node-databank

Got my eye on:

  • oauth-evanp - this is a fork with two patches, so I need to investigate the status of those.
  • node-iconv-lite - needs files downloaded from the internet, so I'm considering how to add them to the source package
  • dateformat/moment - there's an open discussion about combining Node.js modules, and I'm wondering if these are affected.

Thoughts

Currently I'm averaging around one package upload a day, I think? Which would mean ~1 month to go? But there may be challenges around getting packages through the NEW queue in time to build-depend on them.

Someone has asked my temporary Twitter account whether I have a pump.io account. Technically, yes, I do - but I don't post anything on it, because I want to run my own server in the long term. As part of running my own server, I always find that easier if I'm installing software from Debian packages. Hence this work. Sledgehammer, meet nut.

28 August, 2014 01:59PM

August 26, 2014

Simon Josefsson

The Case for Short OpenPGP Key Validity Periods

After I moved to a new OpenPGP key (see key transition statement) I have received comments about the short life length of my new key. When I created the key (see my GnuPG setup) I set it to expire after 100 days. Some people assumed that I would have to create a new key then, and therefore wondered what value there is to sign a key that will expire in two months. It doesn’t work like that, and below I will explain how OpenPGP key expiration works; how to extend the expiration time of your key; and argue why having a relatively short validity period can be a good thing.

The OpenPGP message format has a sub-packet called the Key Expiration Time, quoting the RFC:

5.2.3.6. Key Expiration Time

   (4-octet time field)

   The validity period of the key.  This is the number of seconds after
   the key creation time that the key expires.  If this is not present
   or has a value of zero, the key never expires.  This is found only on
   a self-signature.

You can print the sub-packets in your OpenPGP key with gpg --list-packets. See below an output for my key, and notice the “created 1403464490″ (which is Unix time for 2014-06-22 21:14:50) and the “subpkt 9 len 4 (key expires after 100d0h0m)” which adds up to an expiration on 2014-09-26. Don’t confuse the creation time of the key (“created 1403464321″) with when the signature was created (“created 1403464490″).

jas@latte:~$ gpg --export 54265e8c | gpg --list-packets |head -20
:public key packet:
	version 4, algo 1, created 1403464321, expires 0
	pkey[0]: [3744 bits]
	pkey[1]: [17 bits]
:user ID packet: "Simon Josefsson "
:signature packet: algo 1, keyid 0664A76954265E8C
	version 4, created 1403464490, md5len 0, sigclass 0x13
	digest algo 10, begin of digest be 8e
	hashed subpkt 27 len 1 (key flags: 03)
	hashed subpkt 9 len 4 (key expires after 100d0h0m)
	hashed subpkt 11 len 7 (pref-sym-algos: 9 8 7 13 12 11 10)
	hashed subpkt 21 len 4 (pref-hash-algos: 10 9 8 11)
	hashed subpkt 30 len 1 (features: 01)
	hashed subpkt 23 len 1 (key server preferences: 80)
	hashed subpkt 2 len 4 (sig created 2014-06-22)
	hashed subpkt 25 len 1 (primary user ID)
	subpkt 16 len 8 (issuer key ID 0664A76954265E8C)
	data: [3743 bits]
:signature packet: algo 1, keyid EDA21E94B565716F
	version 4, created 1403466403, md5len 0, sigclass 0x10
jas@latte:~$ 

So the key will simply stop being valid after that time? No. It is possible to update the key expiration time value, re-sign the key, and distribute the key to people you communicate with directly or indirectly to OpenPGP keyservers. Since that date is a couple of weeks away, now felt like the perfect opportunity to go through the exercise of taking out my offline master key and boot from a Debian LiveCD and extend its expiry time. See my earlier writeup for LiveCD and USB stick conventions.

user@debian:~$ export GNUPGHOME=/media/FA21-AE97/gnupghome
user@debian:~$ gpg --edit-key 54265e8c
gpg (GnuPG) 1.4.12; Copyright (C) 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

Secret key is available.

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> expire
Changing expiration time for the primary key.
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
        = key expires in n days
      w = key expires in n weeks
      m = key expires in n months
      y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 150
Key expires at Fri 23 Jan 2015 02:47:48 PM UTC
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Simon Josefsson "
3744-bit RSA key, ID 54265E8C, created 2014-06-22


pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 1

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub* 2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> expire
Changing expiration time for a subkey.
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
        = key expires in n days
      w = key expires in n weeks
      m = key expires in n months
      y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 150
Key expires at Fri 23 Jan 2015 02:48:05 PM UTC
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Simon Josefsson "
3744-bit RSA key, ID 54265E8C, created 2014-06-22


pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub* 2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 2

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub* 2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub* 2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 1

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub* 2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> expire
Changing expiration time for a subkey.
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
        = key expires in n days
      w = key expires in n weeks
      m = key expires in n months
      y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 150
Key expires at Fri 23 Jan 2015 02:48:14 PM UTC
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Simon Josefsson "
3744-bit RSA key, ID 54265E8C, created 2014-06-22


pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub* 2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 3

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub* 2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: E   
sub* 2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 2

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: E   
sub* 2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> expire
Changing expiration time for a subkey.
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
        = key expires in n days
      w = key expires in n weeks
      m = key expires in n months
      y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 150
Key expires at Fri 23 Jan 2015 02:48:23 PM UTC
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Simon Josefsson "
3744-bit RSA key, ID 54265E8C, created 2014-06-22


pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: E   
sub* 2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> save
user@debian:~$ gpg -a --export 54265e8c > /media/KINGSTON/updated-key.txt
user@debian:~$ 

I remove the “transport” USB stick from the “offline” computer, and back on my laptop I can inspect the new updated key. Let’s use the same command as before. The key creation time is the same (“created 1403464321″), of course, but the signature packet has a new time (“created 1409064478″) since it was signed now. Notice “created 1409064478″ and “subpkt 9 len 4 (key expires after 214d19h35m)”. The expiration time is computed based on when the key was generated, not when the signature packet was generated. You may want to double-check the pref-sym-algos, pref-hash-algos and other sub-packets so that you don’t accidentally change anything else. (Btw, re-signing your key is also how you would modify those preferences over time.)

jas@latte:~$ cat /media/KINGSTON/updated-key.txt |gpg --list-packets | head -20
:public key packet:
	version 4, algo 1, created 1403464321, expires 0
	pkey[0]: [3744 bits]
	pkey[1]: [17 bits]
:user ID packet: "Simon Josefsson "
:signature packet: algo 1, keyid 0664A76954265E8C
	version 4, created 1409064478, md5len 0, sigclass 0x13
	digest algo 10, begin of digest 5c b2
	hashed subpkt 27 len 1 (key flags: 03)
	hashed subpkt 11 len 7 (pref-sym-algos: 9 8 7 13 12 11 10)
	hashed subpkt 21 len 4 (pref-hash-algos: 10 9 8 11)
	hashed subpkt 30 len 1 (features: 01)
	hashed subpkt 23 len 1 (key server preferences: 80)
	hashed subpkt 25 len 1 (primary user ID)
	hashed subpkt 2 len 4 (sig created 2014-08-26)
	hashed subpkt 9 len 4 (key expires after 214d19h35m)
	subpkt 16 len 8 (issuer key ID 0664A76954265E8C)
	data: [3744 bits]
:user ID packet: "Simon Josefsson "
:signature packet: algo 1, keyid 0664A76954265E8C
jas@latte:~$ 

Being happy with the new key, I import it and send it to key servers out there.

jas@latte:~$ gpg --import /media/KINGSTON/updated-key.txt 
gpg: key 54265E8C: "Simon Josefsson " 5 new signatures
gpg: Total number processed: 1
gpg:         new signatures: 5
jas@latte:~$ gpg --send-keys 54265e8c
gpg: sending key 54265E8C to hkp server keys.gnupg.net
jas@latte:~$ gpg --keyserver keyring.debian.org  --send-keys 54265e8c
gpg: sending key 54265E8C to hkp server keyring.debian.org
jas@latte:~$ 

Finally: why go through this hassle, rather than set the key to expire in 50 years? Some reasons for this are:

  1. I don’t trust myselt to keep track of a private key (or revocation cert) for 50 years.
  2. I want people to notice my revocation certificate as quickly as possible.
  3. I want people to notice other changes to my key (e.g., cipher preferences) as quickly as possible.

Let’s look into the first reason a bit more. What would happen if I lose both the master key and the revocation cert, for a key that’s valid 50 years? I would start from scratch and create a new key that I upload to keyservers. Then there would be two keys out there that are valid and identify me, and both will have a set of signatures on it. None of them will be revoked. If I happen to lose the new key again, there will be three valid keys out there with signatures on it. You may argue that this shouldn’t be a problem, and that nobody should use any other key than the latest one I want to be used, but that’s a technical argument — and at this point we have moved into usability, and that’s a trickier area. Having users select which out of a couple of apparently all valid keys that exist for me is simply not going to work well.

The second is more subtle, but considerably more important. If people retrieve my key from keyservers today, and it expires in 50 years, there will be no need to refresh it from key servers. If for some reason I have to publish my revocation certificate, there will be people that won’t see it. If instead I set a short validity period, people will have to refresh my key once in a while, and will then either get an updated expiration time, or will get the revocation certificate. This amounts to a CRL/OCSP-like model.

The third is similar to the second, but deserves to be mentioned on its own. Because the cipher preferences are expressed (and signed) in my key, and that ciphers come and go, I would expect that I will modify those during the life-time of my long-term key. If I have a long validity period of my key, people would not refresh it from key servers, and would encrypt messages to me with ciphers I may no longer want to be used.

The downside of having a short validity period is that I have to do slightly more work to get out the offline master key once in a while (which I have to once in a while anyway because I’m signing other peoples keys) and that others need to refresh my key from the key servers. Can anyone identify other disadvantages? Also, having to explain why I’m using a short validity period used to be a downside, but with this writeup posted that won’t be the case any more. :-)

flattr this!

26 August, 2014 06:11PM by Simon Josefsson

hackergotchi for Daniel Pocock

Daniel Pocock

GSoC talks at DebConf 14 today

This year I mentored two students doing work in support of Debian and free software (as well as those I mentored for Ganglia).

Both of them are presenting details about their work at DebConf 14 today.

While Juliana's work has been widely publicised already, mainly due to the fact it is accessible to every individual DD, Andrew's work is also quite significant and creates many possibilities to advance awareness of free software.

The Java project that is not just about Java

Andrew's project is about recursively building Java dependencies from third party repositories such as the Maven Central Repository. It matches up well with the wonderful new maven-debian-helper tool in Debian and will help us to fill out /usr/share/maven-repo on every Debian system.

Firstly, this is not just about Java. On a practical level, some aspects of the project are useful for many other purposes. One of those is the aim of scanning a repository for non-free artifacts, making a Git mirror or clone containing a dfsg branch for generating repackaged upstream source and then testing to see if it still builds.

Then there is the principle of software freedom. The Maven Central repository now requires that people publish a sources JAR and license metadata with each binary artifact they upload. They do not, however, demand that the sources JAR be complete or that the binary can be built by somebody else using the published sources. The license data must be specified but it does not appeared to be verified in the same way as packages inspected by Debian's legendary FTP masters.

Thanks to the transitive dependency magic of Maven, it is quite possible that many Java applications that are officially promoted as free software can't trace the source code of every dependency or build plugin.

Many organizations are starting to become more alarmed about the risk that they are dependent upon some rogue dependency. Maybe they will be hit with a lawsuit from a vendor stating that his plugin was only free for the first 3 months. Maybe some binary dependency JAR contains a nasty trojan for harvesting data about their corporate network.

People familiar with the principles of software freedom are in the perfect position to address these concerns and Andrew's work helps us build a cleaner alternative. It obviously can't rebuild every JAR for the very reason that some of them are not really free - however, it does give the opportunity to build a heat-map of trouble spots and also create a fast track to packaging for those heirarchies of JARs that are truly free.

Making WebRTC accessible to more people

Juliana set out to update rtc.debian.org and this involved working on JSCommunicator, the HTML5/JavaScript softphone based on WebRTC.

People attending the session today or participating remotely are advised to set up your RTC / VoIP password at db.debian.org well in advance so the server will allow you to log in and try it during the session. It can take 30 minutes or so for the passwords to be replicated to the SIP proxy and TURN server.

Please also check my previous comments about what works and what doesn't and in particular, please be aware that Iceweasel / Firefox 24 on wheezy is not suitable unless you are on the same LAN as the person you are calling.

26 August, 2014 04:33PM by Daniel.Pocock

hackergotchi for Christian Perrier

Christian Perrier

[life] Follow bubulle running adventures....

Just in case some of my free software friends would care and try understanding why I'm currently not attending my first DebConf since 2004...

Starting tomorrow 07:00am EST (so, 22:00 PST for Debconfers), I'll be running the "TDS" race of the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc races.

Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (UTMB) is one of the world famous long distance moutain trail races. It takes places in Chamonix, just below the Mont-Blanc, France's and Europe's highest moutain. The race is indeed simple : "go around the Mont-Blanc in a big circle, 160km long, with 10,000 meters positive climb cumulated on the climb of about 10 high passes between 2000 and 2700 meters altitude".

"My" race is a shortened version of UTMB that does half of the full loop, from Courmayeur in Italy (just "the other side" of Mont-Blanc, from Chamonix) and goes back to Chamonix. It is "only" 120 kilometers long with 7200 meters of positive climb. Some of these are however know as more difficult than UTMB itself.

Many firsts for me in this race : first "over 100km", first "over 24 hours running". Still, I trained hard for this, achieved a very though race in early July (60km, 5000m climb) with a very good result, and I expect to make it well.

Top runners complete this in 17 hours.....last arrivals are expected after 33 hours "running" (often fast walking, indeed). I plan to achieve the race in 28 hours but, indeed, I have no idea..:-)

So, in case you're boring in a night hacklab, or just want to draw your attention out of IRC, or don't have any package to polish...or just want to have a thought for an old friend, you can try to use the following link and follow all this live : http://utmb.livetrail.net/coureur.php?rech=6384⟨=en

Race start : 7am EST, Wednesday Aug 27th. bubulle arrival: Thursday Aug. 28th, between 10am and 4pm (best projection is 11am).

And there will be cheese at pit stops....

26 August, 2014 06:09AM

hackergotchi for Neil Williams

Neil Williams

vmdebootstrap images for ARMMP on BBB

After patches from Petter to add foreign architecture support and picking up some scripting from freedombox, I’ve just built a Debian unstable image using the ARMMP kernel on Beaglebone-black.

A few changes to vmdebootstrap will need to go into the next version (0.3), including an example customise script to setup the u-boot support. With the changes, the command would be:

sudo ./vmdebootstrap --owner `whoami` --verbose --size 2G --mirror http://mirror.bytemark.co.uk/debian --log beaglebone-black.log --log-level debug --arch armhf --foreign /usr/bin/qemu-arm-static --no-extlinux --no-kernel --package u-boot --package linux-image-armmp --distribution sid --enable-dhcp --configure-apt --serial-console-command '/sbin/getty -L ttyO0 115200 vt100' --customize examples/beagleboneblack-customise.sh --bootsize 50m --boottype vfat --image bbb.img

Some of those commands are new but there are a few important elements:

  • use of –arch and –foreign to provide the emulation needed to run the debootstrap second stage.
  • drop extlinux and install u-boot as a package.
  • linux-image-armmp kernel
  • new command to configure an apt source
  • serial-console-command as the BBB doesn’t use the default /dev/ttyS0
  • choice of sid to get the latest ARMMP and u-boot versions
  • customize command – this is a script which does two things:
    • copies the dtbs into the boot partition
    • copies the u-boot files and creates a u-boot environment to use those files.
  • use of a boot partition – note that it needs to be large enough to include the ARMMP kernel and a backup of the same files.

With this in place, a simple dd to an SD card and the BBB boots directly into Debian ARMMP.

The examples are now in my branch and include an initial cubieboard script which is unfinished.

The current image is available for download. (222Mb).

I hope to upload the new vmdebootstrap soon – let me know if you do try the version in the branch.

26 August, 2014 02:50AM by Neil Williams

August 25, 2014

Petter Reinholdtsen

Do you need an agreement with MPEG-LA to publish and broadcast H.264 video in Norway?

Two years later, I am still not sure if it is legal here in Norway to use or publish a video in H.264 or MPEG4 format edited by the commercially licensed video editors, without limiting the use to create "personal" or "non-commercial" videos or get a license agreement with MPEG LA. If one want to publish and broadcast video in a non-personal or commercial setting, it might be that those tools can not be used, or that video format can not be used, without breaking their copyright license. I am not sure. Back then, I found that the copyright license terms for Adobe Premiere and Apple Final Cut Pro both specified that one could not use the program to produce anything else without a patent license from MPEG LA. The issue is not limited to those two products, though. Other much used products like those from Avid and Sorenson Media have terms of use are similar to those from Adobe and Apple. The complicating factor making me unsure if those terms have effect in Norway or not is that the patents in question are not valid in Norway, but copyright licenses are.

These are the terms for Avid Artist Suite, according to their published end user license text (converted to lower case text for easier reading):

18.2. MPEG-4. MPEG-4 technology may be included with the software. MPEG LA, L.L.C. requires this notice:

This product is licensed under the MPEG-4 visual patent portfolio license for the personal and non-commercial use of a consumer for (i) encoding video in compliance with the MPEG-4 visual standard (“MPEG-4 video”) and/or (ii) decoding MPEG-4 video that was encoded by a consumer engaged in a personal and non-commercial activity and/or was obtained from a video provider licensed by MPEG LA to provide MPEG-4 video. No license is granted or shall be implied for any other use. Additional information including that relating to promotional, internal and commercial uses and licensing may be obtained from MPEG LA, LLC. See http://www.mpegla.com. This product is licensed under the MPEG-4 systems patent portfolio license for encoding in compliance with the MPEG-4 systems standard, except that an additional license and payment of royalties are necessary for encoding in connection with (i) data stored or replicated in physical media which is paid for on a title by title basis and/or (ii) data which is paid for on a title by title basis and is transmitted to an end user for permanent storage and/or use, such additional license may be obtained from MPEG LA, LLC. See http://www.mpegla.com for additional details.

18.3. H.264/AVC. H.264/AVC technology may be included with the software. MPEG LA, L.L.C. requires this notice:

This product is licensed under the AVC patent portfolio license for the personal use of a consumer or other uses in which it does not receive remuneration to (i) encode video in compliance with the AVC standard (“AVC video”) and/or (ii) decode AVC video that was encoded by a consumer engaged in a personal activity and/or was obtained from a video provider licensed to provide AVC video. No license is granted or shall be implied for any other use. Additional information may be obtained from MPEG LA, L.L.C. See http://www.mpegla.com.

Note the requirement that the videos created can only be used for personal or non-commercial purposes.

The Sorenson Media software have similar terms:

With respect to a license from Sorenson pertaining to MPEG-4 Video Decoders and/or Encoders: Any such product is licensed under the MPEG-4 visual patent portfolio license for the personal and non-commercial use of a consumer for (i) encoding video in compliance with the MPEG-4 visual standard (“MPEG-4 video”) and/or (ii) decoding MPEG-4 video that was encoded by a consumer engaged in a personal and non-commercial activity and/or was obtained from a video provider licensed by MPEG LA to provide MPEG-4 video. No license is granted or shall be implied for any other use. Additional information including that relating to promotional, internal and commercial uses and licensing may be obtained from MPEG LA, LLC. See http://www.mpegla.com.

With respect to a license from Sorenson pertaining to MPEG-4 Consumer Recorded Data Encoder, MPEG-4 Systems Internet Data Encoder, MPEG-4 Mobile Data Encoder, and/or MPEG-4 Unique Use Encoder: Any such product is licensed under the MPEG-4 systems patent portfolio license for encoding in compliance with the MPEG-4 systems standard, except that an additional license and payment of royalties are necessary for encoding in connection with (i) data stored or replicated in physical media which is paid for on a title by title basis and/or (ii) data which is paid for on a title by title basis and is transmitted to an end user for permanent storage and/or use. Such additional license may be obtained from MPEG LA, LLC. See http://www.mpegla.com for additional details.

Some free software like Handbrake and FFMPEG uses GPL/LGPL licenses and do not have any such terms included, so for those, there is no requirement to limit the use to personal and non-commercial.

25 August, 2014 08:10PM

hackergotchi for Steve Kemp

Steve Kemp

Updates on git-hosting and load-balancing

To round up the discussion of the Debian Administration site yesterday I flipped the switch on the load-balancing. Rather than this:

  https -> pound \
                  \
  http  -------------> varnish  --> apache

We now have the simpler route for all requests:

http  -> haproxy -> apache
https -> haproxy -> apache

This means we have one less HTTP-request for all incoming secure connections, and these days secure connections are preferred since a Strict-Transport-Security header is set.

In other news I've been juggling git repositories; I've setup an installation of GitBucket on my git-host. My personal git repository used to contain some private repositories and some mirrors.

Now it contains mirrors of most things on github, as well as many more private repositories.

The main reason for the switch was to get a prettier interface and bug-tracker support.

A side-benefit is that I can use "groups" to organize repositories, so for example:

Most of those are mirrors of the github repositories, but some are new. When signed in I see more sources, for example the source to http://steve.org.uk.

I've been pleased with the setup and performance, though I had to add some caching and some other magic at the nginx level to provide /robots.txt, etc, which are not otherwise present.

I'm not abandoning github, but I will no longer be using it for private repositories (I was gifted a free subscription a year or three ago), and nor will I post things there exclusively.

If a single canonical source location is required for a repository it will be one that I control, maintain, and host.

I don't expect I'll give people commit access on this mirror, but it is certainly possible. In the past I've certainly given people access to private repositories for collaboration, etc.

25 August, 2014 12:32PM

hackergotchi for Erich Schubert

Erich Schubert

Analyzing Twitter - beware of spam

This year I started to widen up my research; and one data source of interest was text because of the lack of structure in it, that makes it often challenging. One of the data sources that everybody seems to use is Twitter: it has a nice API, and few restrictions on using it (except on resharing data). By default, you can get a 1% random sample from all tweets, which is more than enough for many use cases.
We've had some exciting results which a colleague of mine will be presenting tomorrow (Tuesday, Research 22: Topic Modeling) at the KDD 2014 conference:
SigniTrend: Scalable Detection of Emerging Topics in Textual Streams by Hashed Significance Thresholds
Erich Schubert, Michael Weiler, Hans-Peter Kriegel
20th ACM SIGKDD Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining
You can also explore some (static!) results online at signi-trend.appspot.com

In our experiments, the "news" data set was more interesting. But after some work, we were able to get reasonable results out of Twitter as well. As you can see from the online demo, most of these fall into pop culture: celebrity deaths, sports, hip-hop. Not much that would change our live; and even less that wasn't before captured by traditional media.
The focus of this post is on the preprocessing needed for getting good results from Twitter. Because it is much easier to get bad results!
The first thing you need to realize about Twitter is that due to the media attention/hype it gets, it is full of spam. I'm pretty sure the engineers at Twitter already try to reduce spam; block hosts and fraud apps. But a lot of the trending topics we discovered were nothing but spam.
Retweets - the "like" of Twitter - are an easy source to see what is popular, but are not very interesting if you want to analyze text. They just reiterate the exact same text (except for a "RT " prefix) than earlier tweets. We found results to be more interesting if we removed retweets. Our theory is that retweeting requires much less effort than writing a real tweet; and things that are trending "with effort" are more interesting than those that were just liked.
Teenie spam. If you ever searched for a teenie idol on Twitter, say this guy I hadn't heard of before, but who has 3.88 million followers on Twitter, and search for Tweets addressed to him, you will get millions over millions of results. Many of these tweets look like this: Now if you look at this tweet, there is this odd "x804" at the end. This is to defeat a simple spam filter by Twitter. Because this user did not tweet this just once: instead it is common amongst teenie to spam their idols with follow requests by the dozen. Probably using some JavaScript hack, or third party Twitter client. Occassionally, you see hundreds of such tweets, each sent within a few seconds of the previous one. If you get a 1% sample of these, you still get a few then...
Even worse (for data analysis) than teenie spammers are commercial spammers and wannabe "hackers" that exercise their "sk1llz" by spamming Twitter. To get a sample of such spam, just search for weight loss on Twitter. There is plenty of fresh spam there, usually consisting of some text pretending to be news, and an anonymized link (there is no need to use an URL shortener such as bit.ly on Twitter, since Twitter has its own URL shortener t.co; and you'll end up with double-shortened URLs). And the hacker spam is even worse (e.g. #alvianbencifa) as he seems to have trojaned hundreds of users, and his advertisement seems to be a nonexistant hash tag, which he tries to get into Twitters "trending topics".
And then there are the bots. Plenty of bots spam Twitter with their analysis of trending topics, reinforcing the trending topics. In my opinion, bots such as trending topics indonesia are useless. No wonder there are only 280 followers. And of the trending topics reported, most of them seem to be spam topics...

Bottom line: if you plan on analyzing Twitter data, spend considerable time on preprocessing to filter out spam of various kind. For example, we remove singletons and digits, then feed the data through a duplicate detector. We end up discarding 20%-25% of Tweets. But we still get some of the spam, such as that hackers spam.
All in all, real data is just messy. People posting there have an agenda that might be opposite to yours. And if someone (or some company) promises you wonders from "Big data" and "Twitter", you better have them demonstrate their use first, before buying their services. Don't trust visions of what could be possible, because the first rule of data analysis is: Garbage in, garbage out.

25 August, 2014 11:30AM

Hideki Yamane

Could you try to consider speaking more slowly and clearly at sessions, please?


Some people (including me :) are not native English speaking person, and also not use English for usual conversation. So, it's a bit tough for them to hear what you said if you speak as usual speed. We want to listen your presentation to understand and discuss about it (of course!), but sometimes machine gun speaking would prevent it.

Calm down, take a deep breath and do your presentation - then it'll be a fantastic, my cat will be pleased with it as below (meow!).



Thank you for your reading. See you in cheese & wine party.

25 August, 2014 04:08AM by Hideki Yamane (noreply@blogger.com)

August 24, 2014

hackergotchi for DebConf team

DebConf team

Full video coverage for DebConf14 talks (Posted by Tiago Bortoletto Vaz)

We are happy to announce that live video streams will be available for talks and discussion meetings in DebConf14. Recordings will be posted soon after the events. You can also interact with other local and remote attendees by joining the IRC channels which are listed at the streams page.

For people who want to view the streams outside a webbrowser, the page for each room lists direct links to the streams.

More information on the streams and the various possibilities offered is available at DebConf Videostreams.

The schedule of talks is available at DebConf 14 Schedule.

Thanks to our amazing video volunteers for making it possible. If you like the video coverage, please add a thank you note to VideoTeam Thanks

24 August, 2014 08:25PM by DebConf Organizers

Noah Meyerhans

Debconf by train

Today is the first time I've taken an interstate train trip in something like 15 years. A few things about the trip were pleasantly surprising. Most of these will come as no surprise:

  1. Less time wasted in security theater at the station prior to departure.
  2. On-time departure
  3. More comfortable seats than a plane or bus.
  4. Quiet.
  5. Permissive free wifi

Wifi was the biggest surprise. Not that it existed, since we're living in the future and wifi is expected everywhere. It's IPv4 only and stuck behind a NAT, which isn't a big surprise, but it is reasonably open. There isn't any port filtering of non-web TCP ports, and even non-TCP protocols are allowed out. Even my aiccu IPv6 tunnel worked fine from the train, although I did experience some weird behavior with it.

I haven't used aiccu much in quite a while, since I have a native IPv6 connection at home, but it can be convenient while travelling. I'm still trying to figure out happened today, though. The first symptoms were that, although I could ping IPv6 hosts, I could not actually log in via IMAP or ssh. Tcpdump showed all the standard symptoms of a PMTU blackhole. Small packets flow fine, large ones are dropped. The interface MTU is set to 1280, which is the minimum MTU for IPv6 and any path on the internet is expected to handle packets of at least that size. Experimentation via ping6 reveals that the largest payload size I can successfully exchange with a peer is 820 bytes. Add 8 bytes for the ICMPv6 header for 828 bytes of payload, plus 40 bytes for the IPv6 header gives an 868 byte packet, which is well under what should be the MTU for this path.

I've worked around this problem with an ip6tables rule to rewrite the MSS on outgoing SYN packets to 760 bytes, which should leave 40 for the IPv6 header and 20 for any extension headers:

sudo ip6tables -t mangle -A OUTPUT -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,RST SYN -j TCPMSS --set-mss 760

It is working well and will allow me to publish this from the train, which I'd otherwise have been unable to do. But... weird.

24 August, 2014 08:19PM

Vincent Sanders

Without craftsmanship, inspiration is a mere reed shaken in the wind.

While I imagine Johannes Brahms was referring to music I think the sentiment applies to other endeavours just as well. The trap of believing an idea is worth something without an implementation occurs all too often, however this is not such an unhappy tale.

Lars original design idea
Lars Wirzenius, Steve McIntyre and myself were chatting a few weeks ago about several of the ongoing Debian discussions. As is often the case these discussions had devolved into somewhat unproductive noise and yet amongst all this was a voice of reason in Russ Allbery.

Lars decided that would take the opportunity of the upcoming opportunity of Debconf 14 to say thank you to Russ for his work. It was decided that a plaque would be a nice gift and I volunteered to do the physical manufacture. Lars came up with the idea of a DEBCON scale similar to the DEFCON scale and got some text together with an initial design idea.

CAD drawing of cut paths in clear acrylic
I took the initial design and as is often the case what is practically possible forced several changes. The prototype was a steep learning curve on using the Cambridge makespace laser cutter to create all the separate pieces.

The construction is pretty simple and consisted of three layers of transparent acrylic plastic. The base layer is a single piece of plastic with the correct outline. The next layer has the DEBCON title, the Debian swirl and level numbers. The top layer has the text engraved in its back surface giving the impression the text floats above the layer behind it.

Failed prototype DEBCON plaqueFor the prototype I attempted to glue the pieces together. This was a complete disaster and required discarding the entire piece and starting again with new materials.

The final version with stand ready to be presented
For the second version I used four small nylon bolts to hold the sandwich of layers together which worked very well.

Presentation of plaque photo by Aigars Mahinovs
Yesterday at the Debconf 14 opening Steve McIntyre presented it to Russ and I think he was pleased, certainly he was surprised (photo from Aigars Mahinovs).

The design files are available from my design git repo, though why anyone would want to reproduce it I have no idea ;-)

24 August, 2014 07:47PM by Vincent Sanders (noreply@blogger.com)

hackergotchi for Lucas Nussbaum

Lucas Nussbaum

on the Dark Ages of Free Software: a “Free Service Definition”?

Stefano Zacchiroli opened DebConf’14 with an insightful talk titled Debian in the Dark Ages of Free Software (slides available, video available soon).

He makes the point (quoting slide 16) that the Free Software community is winning a war that is becoming increasingly pointless: yes, users have 100% Free Software thin client at their fingertips [or are really a few steps from there]. But all their relevant computations happen elsewhere, on remote systems they do not control, in the Cloud.

That give-up on control of computing is a huge and important problem, and probably the largest challenge for everybody caring about freedom, free speech, or privacy today. Stefano rightfully points out that we must do something about it. The big question is: how can we, as a community, address it?

Towards a Free Service Definition?

I believe that we all feel a bit lost with this issue because we are trying to attack it with our current tools & weapons. However, they are largely irrelevant here: the Free Software Definition is about software, and software is even to be understood strictly in it, as software programs. Applying it to services, or to computing in general, doesn’t lead anywhere. In order to increase the general awareness about this issue, we should define more precisely what levels of control can be provided, to understand what services are not providing to users, and to make an informed decision about waiving a particular level of control when choosing to use a particular service.

Benjamin Mako Hill pointed out yesterday during the post-talk chat that services are not black or white: there aren’t impure and pure services. Instead, there’s a graduation of possible levels of control for the computing we do. The Free Software Definition lists four freedoms — how many freedoms, or types of control, should there be in a Free Service Definition, or a Controlled-Computing Definition? Again, this is not only about software: the platform on which a particular piece of software is executed has a huge impact on the available level of control: running your own instance of WordPress, or using an instance on wordpress.com, provides very different control (even if as Asheesh Laroia pointed out yesterday, WordPress does a pretty good job at providing export and import features to limit data lock-in).

The creation of such a definition is an iterative process. I actually just realized today that (according to Wikipedia) the very first occurrence of an attempt at a Free Software Definition was published in 1986 (GNU’s bulletin Vol 1 No.1, page 8) — I thought it happened a couple of years earlier. Are there existing attempts at defining such freedoms or levels of controls, and at benchmarking such criteria against existing services? Such criteria would not only include control over software modifications and (re)distribution, but also likely include mentions of interoperability and open standards, both to enable the user to move to a compatible service, and to avoid forcing the user to use a particular implementation of a service. A better understanding of network effects is also needed: how much and what type of service lock-in is acceptable on social networks in exchange of functionality?

I think that we should inspire from what was achieved during the last 30 years on Free Software. The tools that were produced are probably irrelevant to address this issue, but there’s a lot to learn from the way they were designed. I really look forward to the day when we will have:

  • a Free Software Definition equivalent for services
  • Debian Free Software Guidelines-like tests/checklist to evaluate services
  • an equivalent of The Cathedral and the Bazaar, explaining how one can build successful business models on top of open services

Exciting times!

24 August, 2014 03:39PM by lucas

hackergotchi for Gregor Herrmann

Gregor Herrmann

Debian Perl Group Micro-Sprint

DebConf 14 has started earlier today with the first two talks in sunny portland, oregon.

this year's edition of DebConf didn't feature a preceding DebCamp, & the attempts to organize a proper pkg-perl sprint were not very successful.

nevertheless, two other members of the Debian Perl Group & me met here in PDX on wednesday for our informal unofficial pkg-perl µ-sprint, & as intended, we've used the last days to work on some pkg-perl QA stuff:

  • upload packages which were waiting for Perl 5.20
  • upload packages which didn't have the Perl Group in Maintainer
  • update OpenTasks wiki page
  • update subscription to Perl packages in Ubuntu/Launchpad
  • start annual git repos cleanup
  • pkg-perl-tools: improve scripts to integrate upstream git repo
  • update alternative (build) dependencies after perl 5.20 upload
  • update Module::Build (build) dependencies

as usual, having someone to poke besides you, & the opportunity to get a second pair of eyes quickly was very beneficial. – & of course, spending time with my nice team mates is always a pleasure for me!

24 August, 2014 12:25AM

August 23, 2014

Thorsten Alteholz

Moving WordPress to another server

Today I moved this blog from a vServer to a dedicated server. The migration went surprisingly smooth. I just had to apt-get install the Debian packages apache2, mysql-server and wordpress. Afterwards only the following steps were necessary:

  • dumping the old database with basically just one command:

    mysqldump -u$DBUSER -p$DBPASS –lock-tables=false $DBNAME > $DBFILE

  • creating the database on the new host:

    CREATE DATABASE $DBNAME;
    \r $DBNAME
    GRANT SELECT,INSERT,UPDATE,DELETE,CREATE,DROP,ALTER ON $DBNAME TO ‘$DBUSER’@'localhost’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘$DBPASS’;
    GRANT SELECT,INSERT,UPDATE,DELETE,CREATE,DROP,ALTER ON $DBNAME.* TO ‘$DBUSER’@'localhost’ IDENTIFIED BY $DBPASS’;
    FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

  • importing the dump with something like:

    mysql –user=$DBUSER –password=$DBPASS $DBNAME < $DBFILE

and almost done …

Finally some fine tuning of /etc/wordpress/htaccess and access rights of a few directories to allow installation of plugins. As I wanted to clean up my wp-content-directory, I manually reinstalled all plugins instead of just copying them. Thankfully all of the important plugins store their data in the database and all settings survived the migration.

23 August, 2014 05:58PM by alteholz

hackergotchi for Antti-Juhani Kaijanaho

Antti-Juhani Kaijanaho

A milestone toward a doctorate

Yesterday I received my official diploma for the degree of Licentiate of Philosophy. The degree lies between a Master’s degree and a doctorate, and is not required; it consists of the coursework required for a doctorate, and a Licentiate Thesis, “in which the student demonstrates good conversance with the field of research and the capability of independently and critically applying scientific research methods” (official translation of the Government decree on university degrees 794/2004, Section 23 Paragraph 2).

The title and abstract of my Licentiate Thesis follow:

Kaijanaho, Antti-Juhani
The extent of empirical evidence that could inform evidence-based design of programming languages. A systematic mapping study.
Jyväskylä: University of Jyväskylä, 2014, 243 p.
(Jyväskylä Licentiate Theses in Computing,
ISSN 1795-9713; 18)
ISBN 978-951-39-5790-2 (nid.)
ISBN 978-951-39-5791-9 (PDF)
Finnish summary

Background: Programming language design is not usually informed by empirical studies. In other fields similar problems have inspired an evidence-based paradigm of practice. Central to it are secondary studies summarizing and consolidating the research literature. Aims: This systematic mapping study looks for empirical research that could inform evidence-based design of programming languages. Method: Manual and keyword-based searches were performed, as was a single round of snowballing. There were 2056 potentially relevant publications, of which 180 were selected for inclusion, because they reported empirical evidence on the efficacy of potential design decisions and were published on or before 2012. A thematic synthesis was created. Results: Included studies span four decades, but activity has been sparse until the last five years or so. The form of conditional statements and loops, as well as the choice between static and dynamic typing have all been studied empirically for efficacy in at least five studies each. Error proneness, programming comprehension, and human effort are the most common forms of efficacy studied. Experimenting with programmer participants is the most popular method. Conclusions: There clearly are language design decisions for which empirical evidence regarding efficacy exists; they may be of some use to language designers, and several of them may be ripe for systematic reviewing. There is concern that the lack of interest generated by studies in this topic area until the recent surge of activity may indicate serious issues in their research approach.

Keywords: programming languages, programming language design, evidence-based paradigm, efficacy, research methods, systematic mapping study, thematic synthesis

A Licentiate Thesis is assessed by two examiners, usually drawn from outside of the home university; they write (either jointly or separately) a substantiated statement about the thesis, in which they suggest a grade. The final grade is almost always the one suggested by the examiners. I was very fortunate to have such prominent scientists as Dr. Stefan Hanenberg and Prof. Stein Krogdahl as the examiners of my thesis. They recommended, and I received, the grade “very good” (4 on a scale of 1–5).

The thesis has been accepted for publication published in our faculty’s licentiate thesis series and will in due course appear has appeared in our university’s electronic database (along with a very small number of printed copies). In the mean time, if anyone wants an electronic preprint, send me email at antti-juhani.kaijanaho@jyu.fi.

Figure 1 of the thesis: an overview of the mapping processFigure 1 of the thesis: an overview of the mapping process

As you can imagine, the last couple of months in the spring were very stressful for me, as I pressed on to submit this thesis. After submission, it took me nearly two months to recover (which certain people who emailed me on Planet Haskell business during that period certainly noticed). It represents the fruit of almost four years of work (way more than normally is taken to complete a Licentiate Thesis, but never mind that), as I designed this study in Fall 2010.

Figure 8 of the thesis: Core studies per publication yearFigure 8 of the thesis: Core studies per publication year

Recently, I have been writing in my blog a series of posts in which I have been trying to clear my head about certain foundational issues that irritated me during the writing of the thesis. The thesis contains some of that, but that part of it is not very strong, as my examiners put it, for various reasons. The posts have been a deliberately non-academic attempt to shape the thoughts into words, to see what they look like fixed into a tangible form. (If you go read them, be warned: many of them are deliberately provocative, and many of them are intended as tentative in fact if not in phrasing; the series also is very incomplete at this time.)

I closed my previous post, the latest post in that series, as follows:

In fact, the whole of 20th Century philosophy of science is a big pile of failed attempts to explain science; not one explanation is fully satisfactory. [...] Most scientists enjoy not pondering it, for it’s a bit like being a cartoon character: so long as you don’t look down, you can walk on air.

I wrote my Master’s Thesis (PDF) in 2002. It was about the formal method called “B”; but I took a lot of time and pages to examine the history and content of formal logic. My supervisor was, understandably, exasperated, but I did receive the highest possible grade for it (which I never have fully accepted I deserved). The main reason for that digression: I looked down, and I just had to go poke the bridge I was standing on to make sure I was not, in fact, walking on air. In the many years since, I’ve taken a lot of time to study foundations, first of mathematics, and more recently of science. It is one reason it took me about eight years to come up with a doable doctoral project (and I am still amazed that my department kept employing me; but I suppose they like my teaching, as do I). The other reason was, it took me that long to realize how to study the design of programming languages without going where everyone has gone before.

Debian people, if any are still reading, may find it interesting that I found significant use for the dctrl-tools toolset I have been writing for Debian for about fifteen years: I stored my data collection as a big pile of dctrl-format files. I ended up making some changes to the existing tools (I should upload the new version soon, I suppose), and I wrote another toolset (unfortunately one that is not general purpose, like the dctrl-tools are) in the process.

For the Haskell people, I mainly have an apology for not attending to Planet Haskell duties in the summer; but I am back in business now. I also note, somewhat to my regret, that I found very few studies dealing with Haskell. I just checked; I mention Haskell several times in the background chapter, but it is not mentioned in the results chapter (because there were not studies worthy of special notice).

I am already working on extending this work into a doctoral thesis. I expect, and hope, to complete that one faster.

23 August, 2014 05:44PM by Antti-Juhani Kaijanaho

hackergotchi for Joachim Breitner

Joachim Breitner

This blog goes static

After a bit more than 9 years, I am replacing Serendipity, which as been hosting my blog, by a self-made static solution. This means that when you are reading this, my server no longer has to execute some rather large body of untyped code to produce the bytes sent to you. Instead, that happens once in a while on my laptop, and they are stored as static files on the server.

I hope to get a little performance boost from this, so that my site can more easily hold up to being mentioned on hackernews. I also do not want to worry about security issues in Serendipity – static files are not hacked.

Of course there are down-sides to having a static blog. The editing is a bit more annoying: I need to use my laptop (previously I could post from anywhere) and I edit text files instead of using a JavaScript-based WYSIWYG editor (but I was slightly annoyed by that as well). But most importantly your readers cannot comment on static pages. There are cloud-based solutions that integrate commenting via JavaScript on your static pages, but I decided to go for something even more low-level: You can comment by writing an e-mail to me, and I’ll put your comment on the page. This has the nice benefit of solving the blog comment spam problem.

The actual implementation of the blog is rather masochistic, as my web page runs on one of these weird obfuscated languages (XSLT). Previously, it contained of XSLT stylesheets producing makefiles calling XSLT sheets. Now it is a bit more-self-contained, with one XSLT stylesheet writing out all the various html and rss files.

I managed to import all my old posts and comments thanks to this script by Michael Hamann (I had played around with this some months ago and just spend what seemed to be an hour to me to find this script again) and a small Haskell script. Old URLs are rewritten (using mod_rewrite) to the new paths, but feed readers might still be confused by this.

This opens the door to a long due re-design of my webpage. But not today...

23 August, 2014 03:54PM by Joachim Breitner (mail@joachim-breitner.de)

hackergotchi for Daniel Pocock

Daniel Pocock

Want to be selected for Google Summer of Code 2015?

I've mentored a number of students in 2013 and 2014 for Debian and Ganglia and most of the companies I've worked with have run internships and graduate programs from time to time. GSoC 2014 has just finished and with all the excitement, many students are already asking what they can do to prepare and be selected in 2015.

My own observation is that the more time the organization has to get to know the student, the more confident they can be selecting that student. Furthermore, the more time that the student has spent getting to know the free software community, the more easily they can complete GSoC.

Here I present a list of things that students can do to maximize their chance of selection and career opportunities at the same time. These tips are useful for people applying for GSoC itself and related programs such as GNOME's Outreach Program for Women or graduate placements in companies.

Disclaimers

There is no guarantee that Google will run the program again in 2015 or any future year.

There is no guarantee that any organization or mentor (including myself) will be involved until the official list of organizations is published by Google.

Do not follow the advice of web sites that invite you to send pizza or anything else of value to prospective mentors.

Following the steps in this page doesn't guarantee selection. That said, people who do follow these steps are much more likely to be considered and interviewed than somebody who hasn't done any of the things in this list.

Understand what free software really is

You may hear terms like free software and open source software used interchangeably.

They don't mean exactly the same thing and many people use the term free software for the wrong things. Not all open source projects meet the definition of free software. Those that don't, usually as a result of deficiencies in their licenses, are fundamentally incompatible with the majority of software that does use genuinely free licenses.

Google Summer of Code is about both writing and publishing your code and it is also about community. It is fundamental that you know the basics of licensing and how to choose a free license that empowers the community to collaborate on your code well after GSoC has finished.

Please review the definition of free software early on and come back and review it from time to time. The The GNU Project / Free Software Foundation have excellent resources to help you understand what a free software license is and how it works to maximize community collaboration.

Don't look for shortcuts

There is no shortcut to GSoC selection and there is no shortcut to GSoC completion.

The student stipend (USD $5,500 in 2014) is not paid to students unless they complete a minimum amount of valid code. This means that even if a student did find some shortcut to selection, it is unlikely they would be paid without completing meaningful work.

If you are the right candidate for GSoC, you will not need a shortcut anyway. Are you the sort of person who can't leave a coding problem until you really feel it is fixed, even if you keep going all night? Have you ever woken up in the night with a dream about writing code still in your head? Do you become irritated by tedious or repetitive tasks and often think of ways to write code to eliminate such tasks? Does your family get cross with you because you take your laptop to Christmas dinner or some other significant occasion and start coding? If some of these statements summarize the way you think or feel you are probably a natural fit for GSoC.

An opportunity money can't buy

The GSoC stipend will not make you rich. It is intended to make sure you have enough money to survive through the summer and focus on your project. Professional developers make this much money in a week in leading business centers like New York, London and Singapore. When you get to that stage in 3-5 years, you will not even be thinking about exactly how much you made during internships.

GSoC gives you an edge over other internships because it involves publicly promoting your work. Many companies still try to hide the potential of their best recruits for fear they will be poached or that they will be able to demand higher salaries. Everything you complete in GSoC is intended to be published and you get full credit for it. Imagine a young musician getting the opportunity to perform on the main stage at a rock festival. This is how the free software community works. It is a meritocracy and there is nobody to hold you back.

Having a portfolio of free software that you have created or collaborated on and a wide network of professional contacts that you develop before, during and after GSoC will continue to pay you back for years to come. While other graduates are being screened through group interviews and testing days run by employers, people with a track record in a free software project often find they go straight to the final interview round.

Register your domain name and make a permanent email address

Free software is all about community and collaboration. Register your own domain name as this will become a focal point for your work and for people to get to know you as you become part of the community.

This is sound advice for anybody working in IT, not just programmers. It gives the impression that you are confident and have a long term interest in a technology career.

Choosing the provider: as a minimum, you want a provider that offers DNS management, static web site hosting, email forwarding and XMPP services all linked to your domain. You do not need to choose the provider that is linked to your internet connection at home and that is often not the best choice anyway. The XMPP foundation maintains a list of providers known to support XMPP.

Create an email address within your domain name. The most basic domain hosting providers will let you forward the email address to a webmail or university email account of your choice. Configure your webmail to send replies using your personalized email address in the From header.

Update your ~/.gitconfig file to use your personalized email address in your Git commits.

Create a web site and blog

Start writing a blog. Host it using your domain name.

Some people blog every day, other people just blog once every two or three months.

Create links from your web site to your other profiles, such as a Github profile page. This helps reinforce the pages/profiles that are genuinely related to you and avoid confusion with the pages of other developers.

Many mentors are keen to see their students writing a weekly report on a blog during GSoC so starting a blog now gives you a head start. Mentors look at blogs during the selection process to try and gain insight into which topics a student is most suitable for.

Create a profile on Github

Github is one of the most widely used software development web sites. Github makes it quick and easy for you to publish your work and collaborate on the work of other people. Create an account today and get in the habbit of forking other projects, improving them, committing your changes and pushing the work back into your Github account.

Github will quickly build a profile of your commits and this allows mentors to see and understand your interests and your strengths.

In your Github profile, add a link to your web site/blog and make sure the email address you are using for Git commits (in the ~/.gitconfig file) is based on your personal domain.

Start using PGP

Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) is the industry standard in protecting your identity online. All serious free software projects use PGP to sign tags in Git, to sign official emails and to sign official release files.

The most common way to start using PGP is with the GnuPG (GNU Privacy Guard) utility. It is installed by the package manager on most Linux systems.

When you create your own PGP key, use the email address involving your domain name. This is the most permanent and stable solution.

Print your key fingerprint using the gpg-key2ps command, it is in the signing-party package on most Linux systems. Keep copies of the fingerprint slips with you.

This is what my own PGP fingerprint slip looks like. You can also print the key fingerprint on a business card for a more professional look.

Using PGP, it is recommend that you sign any important messages you send but you do not have to encrypt the messages you send, especially if some of the people you send messages to (like family and friends) do not yet have the PGP software to decrypt them.

If using the Thunderbird (Icedove) email client from Mozilla, you can easily send signed messages and validate the messages you receive using the Enigmail plugin.

Get your PGP key signed

Once you have a PGP key, you will need to find other developers to sign it. For people I mentor personally in GSoC, I'm keen to see that you try and find another Debian Developer in your area to sign your key as early as possible.

Free software events

Try and find all the free software events in your area in the months between now and the end of the next Google Summer of Code season. Aim to attend at least two of them before GSoC.

Look closely at the schedules and find out about the individual speakers, the companies and the free software projects that are participating. For events that span more than one day, find out about the dinners, pub nights and other social parts of the event.

Try and identify people who will attend the event who have been GSoC mentors or who intend to be. Contact them before the event, if you are keen to work on something in their domain they may be able to make time to discuss it with you in person.

Take your PGP fingerprint slips. Even if you don't participate in a formal key-signing party at the event, you will still find some developers to sign your PGP key individually. You must take a photo ID document (such as your passport) for the other developer to check the name on your fingerprint but you do not give them a copy of the ID document.

Events come in all shapes and sizes. FOSDEM is an example of one of the bigger events in Europe, linux.conf.au is a similarly large event in Australia. There are many, many more local events such as the Debian France mini-DebConf in Lyon, 2015. Many events are either free or free for students but please check carefully if there is a requirement to register before attending.

On your blog, discuss which events you are attending and which sessions interest you. Write a blog during or after the event too, including photos.

Quantcast generously hosted the Ganglia community meeting in San Francisco, October 2013. We had a wild time in their offices with mini-scooters, burgers, beers and the Ganglia book. That's me on the pink mini-scooter and Bernard Li, one of the other Ganglia GSoC 2014 admins is on the right.

Install Linux

GSoC is fundamentally about free software. Linux is to free software what a tree is to the forest. Using Linux every day on your personal computer dramatically increases your ability to interact with the free software community and increases the number of potential GSoC projects that you can participate in.

This is not to say that people using Mac OS or Windows are unwelcome. I have worked with some great developers who were not Linux users. Linux gives you an edge though and the best time to gain that edge is now, while you are a student and well before you apply for GSoC.

If you must run Windows for some applications used in your course, it will run just fine in a virtual machine using Virtual Box, a free software solution for desktop virtualization. Use Linux as the primary operating system.

Here are links to download ISO DVD (and CD) images for some of the main Linux distributions:

If you are nervous about getting started with Linux, install it on a spare PC or in a virtual machine before you install it on your main PC or laptop. Linux is much less demanding on the hardware than Windows so you can easily run it on a machine that is 5-10 years old. Having just 4GB of RAM and 20GB of hard disk is usually more than enough for a basic graphical desktop environment although having better hardware makes it faster.

Your experiences installing and running Linux, especially if it requires some special effort to make it work with some of your hardware, make interesting topics for your blog.

Decide which technologies you know best

Personally, I have mentored students working with C, C++, Java, Python and JavaScript/HTML5.

In a GSoC program, you will typically do most of your work in just one of these languages.

From the outset, decide which language you will focus on and do everything you can to improve your competence with that language. For example, if you have already used Java in most of your course, plan on using Java in GSoC and make sure you read Effective Java (2nd Edition) by Joshua Bloch.

Decide which themes appeal to you

Find a topic that has long-term appeal for you. Maybe the topic relates to your course or maybe you already know what type of company you would like to work in.

Here is a list of some topics and some of the relevant software projects:

  • System administration, servers and networking: consider projects involving monitoring, automation, packaging. Ganglia is a great community to get involved with and you will encounter the Ganglia software in many large companies and academic/research networks. Contributing to a Linux distribution like Debian or Fedora packaging is another great way to get into system administration.
  • Desktop and user interface: consider projects involving window managers and desktop tools or adding to the user interface of just about any other software.
  • Big data and data science: this can apply to just about any other theme. For example, data science techniques are frequently used now to improve system administration.
  • Business and accounting: consider accounting, CRM and ERP software.
  • Finance and trading: consider projects like R, market data software like OpenMAMA and connectivity software (Apache Camel)
  • Real-time communication (RTC), VoIP, webcam and chat: look at the JSCommunicator or the Jitsi project
  • Web (JavaScript, HTML5): look at the JSCommunicator

Before the GSoC application process begins, you should aim to learn as much as possible about the theme you prefer and also gain practical experience using the software relating to that theme. For example, if you are attracted to the business and accounting theme, install the PostBooks suite and get to know it. Maybe you know somebody who runs a small business: help them to upgrade to PostBooks and use it to prepare some reports.

Make something

Make some small project, less than two week's work, to demonstrate your skills. It is important to make something that somebody will use for a practical purpose, this will help you gain experience communicating with other users through Github.

For an example, see the servlet Juliana Louback created for fixing phone numbers in December 2013. It has since been used as part of the Lumicall web site and Juliana was selected for a GSoC 2014 project with Debian.

There is no better way to demonstrate to a prospective mentor that you are ready for GSoC than by completing and publishing some small project like this yourself. If you don't have any immediate project ideas, many developers will also be able to give you tips on small projects like this that you can attempt, just come and ask us on one of the mailing lists.

Ideally, the project will be something that you would use anyway even if you do not end up participating in GSoC. Such projects are the most motivating and rewarding and usually end up becoming an example of your best work. To continue the example of somebody with a preference for business and accounting software, a small project you might create is a plugin or extension for PostBooks.

Getting to know prospective mentors

Many web sites provide useful information about the developers who contribute to free software projects. Some of these developers may be willing to be a GSoC mentor.

For example, look through some of the following:

Getting on the mentor's shortlist

Once you have identified projects that are interesting to you and developers who work on those projects, it is important to get yourself on the developer's shortlist.

Basically, the shortlist is a list of all students who the developer believes can complete the project. If I feel that a student is unlikely to complete a project or if I don't have enough information to judge a student's probability of success, that student will not be on my shortlist.

If I don't have any student on my shortlist, then a project will not go ahead at all. If there are multiple students on the shortlist, then I will be looking more closely at each of them to try and work out who is the best match.

One way to get a developer's attention is to look at bug reports they have created. Github makes it easy to see complaints or bug reports they have made about their own projects or other projects they depend on. Another way to do this is to search through their code for strings like FIXME and TODO. Projects with standalone bug trackers like the Debian bug tracker also provide an easy way to search for bug reports that a specific person has created or commented on.

Once you find some relevant bug reports, email the developer. Ask if anybody else is working on those issues. Try and start with an issue that is particularly easy and where the solution is interesting for you. This will help you learn to compile and test the program before you try to fix any more complicated bugs. It may even be something you can work on as part of your academic program.

Find successful projects from the previous year

Contact organizations and ask them which GSoC projects were most successful. In many organizations, you can find the past students' project plans and their final reports published on the web. Read through the plans submitted by the students who were chosen. Then read through the final reports by the same students and see how they compare to the original plans.

Start building your project proposal now

Don't wait for the application period to begin. Start writing a project proposal now.

When writing a proposal, it is important to include several things:

  • Think big: what is the goal at the end of the project? Does your work help the greater good in some way, such as increasing the market share of Linux on the desktop?
  • Details: what are specific challenges? What tools will you use?
  • Time management: what will you do each week? Are there weeks where you will not work on GSoC due to vacation or other events? These things are permitted but they must be in your plan if you know them in advance. If an accident or death in the family cut a week out of your GSoC project, which work would you skip and would your project still be useful without that? Having two weeks of flexible time in your plan makes it more resilient against interruptions.
  • Communication: are you on mailing lists, IRC and XMPP chat? Will you make a weekly report on your blog?
  • Users: who will benefit from your work?
  • Testing: who will test and validate your work throughout the project? Ideally, this should involve more than just the mentor.

If your project plan is good enough, could you put it on Kickstarter or another crowdfunding site? This is a good test of whether or not a project is going to be supported by a GSoC mentor.

Learn about packaging and distributing software

Packaging is a vital part of the free software lifecycle. It is very easy to upload a project to Github but it takes more effort to have it become an official package in systems like Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu.

Packaging and the communities around Linux distributions help you reach out to users of your software and get valuable feedback and new contributors. This boosts the impact of your work.

To start with, you may want to help the maintainer of an existing package. Debian packaging teams are existing communities that work in a team and welcome new contributors. The Debian Mentors initiative is another great starting place. In the Fedora world, the place to start may be in one of the Special Interest Groups (SIGs).

Think from the mentor's perspective

After the application deadline, mentors have just 2 or 3 weeks to choose the students. This is actually not a lot of time to be certain if a particular student is capable of completing a project. If the student has a published history of free software activity, the mentor feels a lot more confident about choosing the student.

Some mentors have more than one good student while other mentors receive no applications from capable students. In this situation, it is very common for mentors to send each other details of students who may be suitable. Once again, if a student has a good Github profile and a blog, it is much easier for mentors to try and match that student with another project.

GSoC logo generic

Conclusion

Getting into the world of software engineering is much like joining any other profession or even joining a new hobby or sporting activity. If you run, you probably have various types of shoe and a running watch and you may even spend a couple of nights at the track each week. If you enjoy playing a musical instrument, you probably have a collection of sheet music, accessories for your instrument and you may even aspire to build a recording studio in your garage (or you probably know somebody else who already did that).

The things listed on this page will not just help you walk the walk and talk the talk of a software developer, they will put you on a track to being one of the leaders. If you look over the profiles of other software developers on the Internet, you will find they are doing most of the things on this page already. Even if you are not selected for GSoC at all or decide not to apply, working through the steps on this page will help you clarify your own ideas about your career and help you make new friends in the software engineering community.

23 August, 2014 11:37AM by Daniel.Pocock

Tim Retout

Packaging pump.io for Debian

I intend to intend to package pump.io for Debian. It's going to take a long time, but I don't know whether that's weeks or years yet. The world needs decentralized social networking.

I discovered the tools that let me create this wiki summary of the progress in pump.io packaging. There are at least 35 dependencies that need uploading, so this would go a lot faster if it weren't a solo effort - if anyone else has some time, please let me know! But meanwhile I'm hoping to build some momentum.

I think it's important to keep the quality of the packaging as high as possible, even while working through so many. It would cost a lot of time later if I had to go back and fix bugs in everything. I really want to be running the test suites in these builds, but it's not always easy.

One of the milestones along the way might be packaging nodeunit. Nodeunit is a Nodejs unit testing framework (duh), used by node-bcrypt (and, unrelatedly, statsd, which would be pretty cool to have in Debian too). Last night I filed eight pull requests to try and fix up copyright/licensing issues in dependencies of nodeunit.

Missing copyright statements are one of the few things I can't fix by myself as a packager. All I can do is wait, and package other dependencies in the meantime. Fortunately there are plenty of those.

And I have not seen so many issues in direct dependencies of pump.io itself - or at least they've been fixed in git.

23 August, 2014 09:24AM

hackergotchi for Steve Kemp

Steve Kemp

Updating Debian Administration, the code

So I previously talked about the setup behind Debian Administration, and my complaints about the slownes.

The previous post talked about the logical setup, and the hardware. This post talks about the more interesting thing. The code.

The code behind the site was originally written by Denny De La Haye. I found it and reworked it a lot, most obviously adding structure and test cases.

Once I did that the early version of the site was born.

Later my version became the official version, as when Denny setup Police State UK he used my codebase rather than his.

So the code huh? Well as you might expect it is written in Perl. There used to be this layout:

]
yawns/cgi-bin/index.cgi
yawns/cgi-bin/Pages.pl
yawns/lib/...
yawns/htdocs/

Almost every request would hit the index.cgi script, which would parse the request and return the appropriate output via the standard CGI interface.

How did it know what you wanted? Well sometimes there would be a paramater set which would be looked up in a dispatch-table:

/cgi-bin/index.cgi?article=40         - Show article 40
/cgi-bin/index.cgi?view_user=Steve    - Show the user Steve
/cgi-bin/index.cgi?recent_comments=10 - Show the most recent comments.

Over time the code became hard to update because there was no consistency, and over time the site became slow because this is not a quick setup. Spiders, bots, and just average users would cause a lot of perl processes to run.

So? What did I do? I moved the thing to using FastCGI, which avoids the cost of forking Perl and loading (100k+) the code.

Unfortunately this required a bit of work because all the parameter handling was messy and caused issues if I just renamed index.cgi -> index.fcgi. The most obvious solution was to use one parameter, globally, to specify the requested mode of operation.

Hang on? One parameter to control the page requested? A persistant environment? What does that remind me of? Yes. CGI::Application.

I started small, and pulled some of the code out of index.cgi + Pages.pl, and over into a dedicated CGI::Application class:

  • Application::Feeds - Called via /cgi-bin/f.fcgi.
  • Application::Ajax - Called via /cgi-bin/a.fcgi.

So now every part of the site that is called by Ajax has one persistent handler, and every part of the site which returns RSS feeds has another.

I had some fun setting up the sessions to match those created by the old stuff, but I quickly made it work, as this example shows:

The final job was the biggest, moving all the other (non-feed, non-ajax) modes over to a similar CGI::Application structure. There were 53 modes that had to be ported, and I did them methodically, first porting all the Poll-related requests, then all the article-releated ones, & etc. I think I did about 15 a day for three days. Then the rest in a sudden rush.

In conclusion the code is now fast because we don't use CGI, and instead use FastCGI.

This allowed minor changes to be carried out, such as compiling the HTML::Template templates which determine the look and feel, etc. Those things don't make sense in the CGI environment, but with persistence they are essentially free.

The site got a little more of a speed boost when I updated DNS, and a lot more when I blacklisted a bunch of IP-space.

As I was wrapping this up I realized that the code had accidentally become closed - because the old repository no longer exists. That is not deliberate, or intentional, and will be rectified soon.

The site would never have been started if I'd not seen Dennys original project, and although I don't think others would use the code it should be possible. I remember at the time I was searching for things like "Perl CMS" and finding Slashcode, and Scoop, which I knew were too heavyweight for my little toy blog.

In conclusion Debian Administration website is 10 years old now. It might not have changed the world, it might have become less relevant, but I'm glad I tried, and I'm glad there were years when it really was the best place to be.

These days there are HowtoForges, blogs, spam posts titled "How to install SSH on Trusty", "How to install SSH on Wheezy", "How to install SSH on Precise", and all that. No shortage of content, just finding the good from the bad is the challenge.

Me? The single best resource I read these days is probably LWN.net.

Starting to ramble now.

Go look at my quick hack for remote command execution https://github.com/skx/nanoexec ?

23 August, 2014 08:04AM

hackergotchi for DebConf team

DebConf team

Welcome to DebConf (Posted by Allison Randal)

Welcome to Portland, the City of Roses! You may find it helpful to grab a copy of the Campus Map. A few key locations:

  • Main conference venue is (for registration, sessions, and daytime hacklabs) on the 3rd floor of the Smith Memorial Student Union building at SW Broadway & SW Harrison.
  • Dorms are The Broadway (SW 6th and SW Jackson) and Ondine (SW 6th and SW College). Check in at The Broadway on the 2nd floor (Suite 210).
  • Night hacklabs are on the second floors of both Broadway and Ondine residence halls.
  • Sponsored meals are served in the Ondine cafe at SW 6th and SW College.
  • Show your badge at Olé Latte Coffee (food cart) on SW 5th & SW Harrison, to get free drop coffee, espresso, and loose leaf tea, 10% off other drinks and food, and an additional $1 off coffee drinks for the first 200 people every day. Open Weekdays 9-12 and 3-4, and Sat-Sun 9-1:30.
  • There will be yoga at on the 2nd floor of The Broadway residence at 7am on the 25th & 25th, and 28th & 29th. Sign up in advance on the wiki.

23 August, 2014 02:40AM by DebConf Organizers

August 22, 2014

hackergotchi for Paul Tagliamonte

Paul Tagliamonte

On my way to DebConf 14

Slowly, but I’ll be in by Tonight, PST (early morning EST!)

Hope to see everyone soon!

22 August, 2014 03:33PM

Russell Coker

Men Commenting on Women’s Issues

A lecture at LCA 2011 which included some inappropriate slides was followed by long discussions on mailing lists. In February 2011 I wrote a blog post debunking some of the bogus arguments in two lists [1]. One of the noteworthy incidents in the mailing list discussion concerned Ted Ts’o (an influential member of the Linux community) debating the definition of rape. My main point on that issue in Feb 2011 was that it’s insensitive to needlessly debate the statistics.

Recently Valerie Aurora wrote about another aspect of this on The Ada Initiative blog [2] and on her personal blog. Some of her significant points are that conference harassment doesn’t end when the conference ends (it can continue on mailing lists etc), that good people shouldn’t do nothing when bad things happen, and that free speech doesn’t mean freedom from consequences or the freedom to use private resources (such as conference mailing lists) without restriction.

Craig Sanders wrote a very misguided post about the Ted Ts’o situation [3]. One of the many things wrong with his post is his statement “I’m particularly disgusted by the men who intervene way too early – without an explicit invitation or request for help or a clear need such as an immediate threat of violence – in womens’ issues“.

I believe that as a general rule when any group of people are involved in causing a problem they should be involved in fixing it. So when we have problems that are broadly based around men treating women badly the prime responsibility should be upon men to fix them. It seems very clear that no matter what scope is chosen for fixing the problems (whether it be lobbying for new legislation, sociological research, blogging, or directly discussing issues with people to change their attitudes) women are doing considerably more than half the work. I believe that this is an indication that overall men are failing.

Asking for Help

I don’t believe that members of minority groups should have to ask for help. Asking isn’t easy, having someone spontaneously offer help because it’s the right thing to do can be a lot easier to accept psychologically than having to beg for help. There is a book named “Women Don’t Ask” which has a page on the geek feminism Wiki [4]. I think the fact that so many women relate to a book named “Women Don’t Ask” is an indication that we shouldn’t expect women to ask directly, particularly in times of stress. The Wiki page notes a criticism of the book that some specific requests are framed as “complaining”, so I think we should consider a “complaint” from a woman as a direct request to do something.

The geek feminism blog has an article titled “How To Exclude Women Without Really Trying” which covers many aspects of one incident [5]. Near the end of the article is a direct call for men to be involved in dealing with such problems. The geek feminism Wiki has a page on “Allies” which includes “Even a blog post helps” [6]. It seems clear from public web sites run by women that women really want men to be involved.

Finally when I get blog comments and private email from women who thank me for my posts I take it as an implied request to do more of the same.

One thing that we really don’t want is to have men wait and do nothing until there is an immediate threat of violence. There are two massive problems with that plan, one is that being saved from a violent situation isn’t a fun experience, the other is that an immediate threat of violence is most likely to happen when there is no-one around to intervene.

Men Don’t Listen to Women

Rebecca Solnit wrote an article about being ignored by men titled “Men Explain Things to Me” [7]. When discussing women’s issues the term “Mansplaining” is often used for that sort of thing, the geek feminism Wiki has some background [8]. It seems obvious that the men who have the greatest need to be taught some things related to women’s issues are the ones who are least likely to listen to women. This implies that other men have to teach them.

Craig says that women need “space to discover and practice their own strength and their own voices“. I think that the best way to achieve that goal is to listen when women speak. Of course that doesn’t preclude speaking as well, just listen first, listen carefully, and listen more than you speak.

Craig claims that when men like me and Matthew Garrett comment on such issues we are making “women’s spaces more comfortable, more palatable, for men“. From all the discussion on this it seems quite obvious that what would make things more comfortable for men would be for the issue to never be discussed at all. It seems to me that two of the ways of making such discussions uncomfortable for most men are to discuss sexual assault and to discuss what should be done when you have a friend who treats women in a way that you don’t like. Matthew has covered both of those so it seems that he’s doing a good job of making men uncomfortable – I think that this is a good thing, a discussion that is “comfortable and palatable” for the people in power is not going to be any good for the people who aren’t in power.

The Voting Aspect

It seems to me that when certain issues are discussed we have a social process that is some form of vote. If one person complains then they are portrayed as crazy. When other people agree with the complaint then their comments are marginalised to try and preserve the narrative of one crazy person. It seems that in the case of the discussion about Rape Apology and LCA2011 most men who comment regard it as one person (either Valeria Aurora or Matthew Garrett) causing a dispute. There is even some commentary which references my blog post about Rape Apology [9] but somehow manages to ignore me when it comes to counting more than one person agreeing with Valerie. For reference David Zanetti was the first person to use the term “apologist for rapists” in connection with the LCA 2011 discussion [10]. So we have a count of at least three men already.

These same patterns always happen so making a comment in support makes a difference. It doesn’t have to be insightful, long, or well written, merely “I agree” and a link to a web page will help. Note that a blog post is much better than a comment in this regard, comments are much like conversation while a blog post is a stronger commitment to a position.

I don’t believe that the majority is necessarily correct. But an opinion which is supported by too small a minority isn’t going to be considered much by most people.

The Cost of Commenting

The Internet is a hostile environment, when you comment on a contentious issue there will be people who demonstrate their disagreement in uncivilised and even criminal ways. S. E. Smith wrote an informative post for Tiger Beatdown about the terrorism that feminist bloggers face [11]. I believe that men face fewer threats than women when they write about such things and the threats are less credible. I don’t believe that any of the men who have threatened me have the ability to carry out their threats but I expect that many women who receive such threats will consider them to be credible.

The difference in the frequency and nature of the terrorism (and there is no other word for what S. E. Smith describes) experienced by men and women gives a vastly different cost to commenting. So when men fail to address issues related to the behavior of other men that isn’t helping women in any way. It’s imposing a significant cost on women for covering issues which could be addressed by men for minimal cost.

It’s interesting to note that there are men who consider themselves to be brave because they write things which will cause women to criticise them or even accuse them of misogyny. I think that the women who write about such issues even though they will receive threats of significant violence are the brave ones.

Not Being Patronising

Craig raises the issue of not being patronising, which is of course very important. I think that the first thing to do to avoid being perceived as patronising in a blog post is to cite adequate references. I’ve spent a lot of time reading what women have written about such issues and cited the articles that seem most useful in describing the issues. I’m sure that some women will disagree with my choice of references and some will disagree with some of my conclusions, but I think that most women will appreciate that I read what women write (it seems that most men don’t).

It seems to me that a significant part of feminism is about women not having men tell them what to do. So when men offer advice on how to go about feminist advocacy it’s likely to be taken badly. It’s not just that women don’t want advice from men, but that advice from men is usually wrong. There are patterns in communication which mean that the effective strategies for women communicating with men are different from the effective strategies for men communicating with men (see my previous section on men not listening to women). Also there’s a common trend of men offering simplistic advice on how to solve problems, one thing to keep in mind is that any problem which affects many people and is easy to solve has probably been solved a long time ago.

Often when social issues are discussed there is some background in the life experience of the people involved. For example Rookie Mag has an article about the street harassment women face which includes many disturbing anecdotes (some of which concern primary school students) [12]. Obviously anyone who has lived through that sort of thing (which means most women) will instinctively understand some issues related to threatening sexual behavior that I can’t easily understand even when I spend some time considering the matter. So there will be things which don’t immediately appear to be serious problems to me but which are interpreted very differently by women. The non-patronising approach to such things is to accept the concerns women express as legitimate, to try to understand them, and not to argue about it. For example the issue that Valerie recently raised wasn’t something that seemed significant when I first read the email in question, but I carefully considered it when I saw her posts explaining the issue and what she wrote makes sense to me.

I don’t think it’s possible for a man to make a useful comment on any issue related to the treatment of women without consulting multiple women first. I suggest a pre-requisite for any man who wants to write any sort of long article about the treatment of women is to have conversations with multiple women who have relevant knowledge. I’ve had some long discussions with more than a few women who are involved with the FOSS community. This has given me a reasonable understanding of some of the issues (I won’t claim to be any sort of expert). I think that if you just go and imagine things about a group of people who have a significantly different life-experience then you will be wrong in many ways and often offensively wrong. Just reading isn’t enough, you need to have conversations with multiple people so that they can point out the things you don’t understand.

This isn’t any sort of comprehensive list of ways to avoid being patronising, but it’s a few things which seem like common mistakes.

Anne Onne wrote a detailed post advising men who want to comment on feminist blogs etc [13], most of it applies to any situation where men comment on women’s issues.

22 August, 2014 01:54AM by etbe

Ian Donnelly

Wrapping Up

Hi Everybody!

I have been keeping very busy on this blog the past few days with some very exciting updates! Everything is now in place for my Google Summer of Code project! Elektra now has the ability to merge KeySets, ucf has been patched to allow custom merge commands, we included a new elektra-merge script to use in conjunction with the new ucf command, and we wrote a great tutorial on how to use Elektra to merge configuration files in any package using ucf. There are few things I have missed updating you all on or are still wrapping up.

First of all, I would like to address the Debian packages. While Elektra includes everything needed for my Google Summer of Code Project, it must be built from source right now. Unfortunately, with the rapid development Elektra has seen the past few months, we did not pay enough attention to the Debian packages and they became dusty and riddles with bugs. Fortunately, we have a solution and his name is Pino Toscano. Pino has, very graciously, agreed to help us fix our Debian packages back into shape. If you wish to see the current progress of the packages, you can check his repo. Pino has already made fantastic progress creating the Debian packages. I will post here when packages are all fixed up and the latest versions of Elektra are into the Debian repo.

Some great news that we just received is that Elektra 0.8.7 has just been accepted into Debian unstable! This is huge progress for our team and means that users can now download our packages directly from Debian’s unstable repo and test out these new features. Obviously, the normal caveats apply for any packages in unstable but this is still an amazing piece of news and I would like to thank Pino again for all the support he has provided.

Another worthy piece of news that I unfortunately haven’t had time to cover is that thanks to Felix Berlakovich Elektra has a new plug-in called ini. In case you couldn’t guess, this new plug-in is used to mount ini files and the good news is that it is a vast improvement on our older simpleini plug-in. While it is still a work in progress, this new plug-in is much more powerful than simpleini. The new plug-in supports section and comments and works with many more ini files than the old plug-in. You may have noticed that I used this new plug-in to mount smb.conf in my technical demo of Samba using Elektra from configuration merging. Since smb.conf follows the same syntax as an ini file this new plug-in works great for mounting this file into the Elektra Key Database.

I hope my blogs so far have been very informative and helpful.

Sincerely,
Ian S. Donnelly

22 August, 2014 12:58AM by Ian Donnelly

August 21, 2014

hackergotchi for Dirk Eddelbuettel

Dirk Eddelbuettel

RcppEigen 0.3.2.2.0

A new upstream release of the Eigen C++ template library for linear algebra was released a few days ago. And Yixuan Qiu did some really nice work rolling this into a new RcppEigen released and then sent me a nice pull requent. The new version is now on CRAN, and I will prepare a Debian in a moment too.

Upstream changes for Eigen are summarized in their changelog. On the RcppEigen side, Yixuan also rolled in some more changes on as() and wrap() converters as noted below in the NEWS entry.

Changes in RcppEigen version 0.3.2.2.0 (2014-08-19)

  • Updated to version 3.2.2 of Eigen

  • Rcpp::as() now supports the conversion from R vector to “row array”, i.e., Eigen::Array<T, 1, Eigen::Dynamic>

  • Rcpp::as() now supports the conversion from dgRMatrix (row oriented sparse matrices, defined in Matrix package) to Eigen::MappedSparseMatrix<T, Eigen::RowMajor>

  • Conversion from R matrix to Eigen::MatrixXd and Eigen::ArrayXXd using Rcpp::as() no longer gives compilation errors

Courtesy of CRANberries, there are diffstat reports for the most recent release.

Questions, comments etc about RcppEigen should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

21 August, 2014 11:58PM

hackergotchi for Steve Kemp

Steve Kemp

Updating Debian Administration

Recently I've been getting annoyed with the Debian Administration website; too often it would be slower than it should be considering the resources behind it.

As a brief recap I have six nodes:

  • 1 x MySQL Database - The only MySQL database I personally manage these days.
  • 4 x Web Nodes.
  • 1 x Misc server.

The misc server is designed to display events. There is a node.js listener which receives UDP messages and stores them in a rotating buffer. The messages might contain things like "User bob logged in", "Slaughter ran", etc. It's a neat hack which gives a good feeling of what is going on cluster-wide.

I need to rationalize that code - but there's a very simple predecessor posted on github for the curious.

Anyway enough diversions, the database is tuned, and "small". The misc server is almost entirely irrelevent, non-public, and not explicitly advertised.

So what do the web nodes run? Well they run a lot. Potentially.

Each web node has four services configured:

  • Apache 2.x - All nodes.
  • uCarp - All nodes.
  • Pound - Master node.
  • Varnish - Master node.

Apache runs the main site, listening on *:8080.

One of the nodes will be special and will claim a virtual IP provided via ucarp. The virtual IP is actually the end-point visitors hit, meaning we have:

Master HostOther hosts

Running:

  • Apache.
  • Pound.
  • Varnish

Running:

  • Apache.

Pound is configured to listen on the virtual IP and perform SSL termination. That means that incoming requests get proxied from "vip:443 -> vip:80". Varnish listens on "vip:80" and proxies to the back-end apache instances.

The end result should be high availability. In the typical case all four servers are alive, and all is well.

If one server dies, and it is not the master, then it will simply be dropped as a valid back-end. If a single server dies and it is the master then a new one will appear, thanks to the magic of ucarp, and the remaining three will be used as expected.

I'm sure there is a pathological case when all four hosts die, and at that point the site will be down, but that's something that should be atypical.

Yes, I am prone to over-engineering. The site doesn't have any availability requirements that justify this setup, but it is good to experiment and learn things.

So, with this setup in mind, with incoming requests (on average) being divided at random onto one of four hosts, why is the damn thing so slow?

We'll come back to that in the next post.

(Good news though; I fixed it ;)

21 August, 2014 08:50AM

hackergotchi for Wouter Verhelst

Wouter Verhelst

Multiarchified eID libraries, now public

Yesterday, I spent most of the day finishing up the multiarch work I'd been doing on introducing multiarch to the eID middleware, and did another release of the Linux builds. As such, it's now possible to install 32-bit versions of the eID middleware on a 64-bit Linux distribution. For more details, please see the announcement.

Learning how to do multiarch (or biarch, as the case may be) for three different distribution families has been a, well, learning experience. Being a Debian Developer, figuring out the technical details for doing this on Debian and its derivatives wasn't all that hard. You just make sure the libraries are installed to the multiarch-safe directories (i.e., /usr/lib/<gnu arch triplet>), you add some Multi-Arch: foreign or Multi-Arch: same headers where appropriate, and you're done. Of course the devil is in the details (define "where appropriate"), but all in all it's not that difficult and fairly deterministic.

The Fedora (and derivatives, like RHEL) approach to biarch is that 64-bit distributions install into /usr/lib64 and 32-bit distributions install into /usr/lib. This goes for any architecture family, not just the x86 family; the same method works on ppc and ppc64. However, since fedora doesn't do powerpc anymore, that part is a detail of little relevance.

Once that's done, yum has some heuristics whereby it will prefer native-architecture versions of binaries when asked, and may install both the native-architecture and foreign-architecture version of a particular library package at the same time. Since RPM already has support for installing multiple versions of the same package on the same system (a feature that was originally created, AIUI, to support the installation of multiple kernel versions), that's really all there is to it. It feels a bit fiddly and somewhat fragile, since there isn't really a spec and some parts seem fairly undefined, but all in all it seems to work well enough in practice.

The openSUSE approach is vastly different to the other two. Rather than installing the foreign-architecture packages natively, as in the Debian and Fedora approaches, openSUSE wants you to take the native foo.ix86.rpm package and convert that to a foo-32bit.x86_64.rpm package. The conversion process filters out non-unique files (only allows files to remain in the package if they are in library directories, IIUC), and copes with the lack of license files in /usr/share/doc by adding a dependency header on the native package. While the approach works, it feels like unnecessary extra work and bandwidth to me, and obviously also wouldn't scale beyond biarch.

It also isn't documented very well; when I went to openSUSE IRC channels and started asking questions, the reply was something along the lines of "hand this configuration file to your OBS instance". When I told them I wasn't actually using OBS and had no plans of migrating to it (because my current setup is complex enough as it is, and replacing it would be far too much work for too little gain), it suddenly got eerily quiet.

Eventually I found out that the part of OBS which does the actual build is a separate codebase, and integrating just that part into my existing build system was not that hard to do, even though it doesn't come with a specfile or RPM package and wants to install files into /usr/bin and /usr/lib. With all that and some more weirdness I've found in the past few months that I've been building packages for openSUSE I now have... Ideas(TM) about how openSUSE does things. That's for another time, though.

(disclaimer: there's a reason why I'm posting this on my personal blog and not on an official website... don't take this as an official statement of any sort!)

21 August, 2014 08:30AM